AP Human GeographyNRHS
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Geography of Thanksgiving

Geography of Thanksgiving | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 26, 2014 3:31 PM

I am very pleased to be blogging for National Geographic Education.  Here is the link to my first post on the geography of Thanksgiving. 

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 28, 2014 2:34 PM

Dr. Seth Dixon also has geographyeducation.org, one of the finest sites of its kind...

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
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Who buys all the flowers and jewelry on Valentine's Day?

Who buys all the flowers and jewelry on Valentine's Day? | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Americans like to buy jewelry and flowers all year, not just for Valentine’s Day. How much do they spend annually, and who would probably spend the most?

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 14, 2013 1:22 PM

This is a fabulous set of maps that shows the value of GIS to assess the market feasiblity for any given commodity.  On this Valentine's Day, it is especially interesting to map out the zip codes that purchase the most flowers, jewelry and diamonds.    

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Maple Syrup Time

Maple Syrup Time | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

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Louis Culotta's comment, April 8, 2013 11:45 AM
this is cool. A friend of mine bought all the equipment and is making it in the woods in his backyard up in Cumberland.
Mary Burke's comment, April 12, 2013 3:53 PM
When I get pancakes at a restaurant I always ask for real maple syrup. They charge more but its worth it. I venture to say that the Canadian maple syrup subsidies might have something to do with less syrup production around here and also might be why syrup so expensive.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, December 6, 2013 11:53 AM

I actually made maple syrup about a year ago, a couple of roads away from my house.  I know a family that makes it every year, and I was invited to come join them harvesting the syrup.  I had done it there many years ago, but I had a blast.  The father of a guy I went to school with was there boiling the sap, and we had a lot of interesting discussions about the process, including the importance of the climate.  Apparently, if I remember correctly, it is vital to have the freezing temperatures, followed by warm days- which is also mentioned in the article.  He said that gets the "blood" of the tree pumping, and greatly increases the syrup production.  I got to taste the sap as it was being boiled down to concentrated levels, and it was amazing.  I think that using natural resources like that is really cool.  I had a great time, and know that it takes a LOT of sap to make very LITTLE syrup, but it can be totally worth it. I enjoyed gardening when my family had a garden, and I think that that sort of natural harvest and refinement for consumption can be immensely entertaining, as well as rewarding.  I know this family usually makes enough for themselves, and that they give a little away, and end up having enough to get through the year.  It is a really enjoyable activity, and I reccommend it to anyone that doesn't mind getting cold outside or covered in tree sap.