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India's Potty Problem

India's Potty Problem | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

Which statement is true? 

 

A. 60% of all households without toilets in the world are in India.
B. India’s Muslims are less affected by the sanitation problem than Hindus.
C. India’s lack of toilets is worse than China’s.
D. Lack of toilets in India puts women at especially high risk.


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Brett Laskowitz's curator insight, April 19, 7:41 PM

Excellent article for sparking discussion on the costs of development.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 22, 6:37 PM

Unfathomable to see that all of these are true, but at the same time not unbelievable.  I can see sanitation problems being relevant wherever there is overpopulation in the world.  Especially here where Muslims are defecating outside as a part of ritual, you wonder if they would use toilets even if they had them.  India is lucky they don't have some disease running ram,pant that can kill large portions of their population in a hurry like the plague in England.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 24, 10:48 AM

In America, this story is not fathomable.  The sanitation problem in India goes beyond cultural norms, in my opinion.  I think it is evident of an infrastructure that is way behind the country's socioeconomic level of growth.  It seems like finally, after electing a new prime minister, that there will be much focus brought on the issue.  It also seems that if they don't shore up this sanitation issue that they will have a bigger epidemic on their hands, as there have been recent murders and rapes of young women in these sanitation fields.

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Yardstick of Wealth | Geography Education | Sou...

Yardstick of Wealth | Geography Education | Sou... | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
"In the last of a series of programmes exploring global population for the award-winning This World strand, Rosling presents an 'as live' studio event featuring cutting-edge 3D infographics painting a vivid picture of a world that has changed in...
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Gap between US rich and poor reaches record width

Gap between US rich and poor reaches record width | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
America's top 1 percent of earners control 19.3 percent of total household income, a gap wider even than in 1927.

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In Kenya, Using Tech To Put An 'Invisible' Slum On The Map

In Kenya, Using Tech To Put An 'Invisible' Slum On The Map | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
A billion people worldwide live in slums, largely invisible to city services and governments — but not to satellites.

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John Blunnie's curator insight, July 28, 2013 1:11 PM

Great how tech and globalization can help represed people in other countries.

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 6, 2013 5:07 PM

The slum-mapping movement began in India almost a decade ago and migrated to africa, the idea of this is to make slums a reality to people who have never set foot in one before. The maps can be used in court to stop evictions or simply to raise awarance. I think this idea is on the right track of what needs to be done. These people need help and so many people incuding the governement pretend they arent their but with these maps as proof they can no longer do that.    

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 2014 10:24 AM

Slums and squatter settlements are a problem that a lot of the developing world has to deal with.  The unsafe and unsanitary buildings cause headaches and problems for the leaders of the cities they surround.  This story is hopeful in that the city did manage to bring a water line out to get clean water to the people living in this area.  Perhaps this will lead to a better quality of life of the inhabitants of this particular slum.  Also the project of mapping such areas can be a useful tool for city planners to better regulate these areas and help the people that live there.,

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The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism

The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Researchers are heading to Dharavi, Mumbai, to study the impact of slum tours on the residents.

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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 8:36 PM

I don’t find nothing right about tourist visiting the slum, I feel that the tourist are violating there privacy. They are human being not some historical landmark. If the tourist are not helping this people why are they going? If you are going to visit this places do it because you want to help them, not because you think is interesting their way of living.

Cam E's curator insight, April 1, 2014 11:57 AM

Moral questions are always fun. Personally I don't think going to see slums is all that exploitative in itself, but I would make a distinction between guided tours that cost money, and self-directed tours though. In a guided tour you are paying money to walk through a community and view what life is like for those people, but in a self-directed tour you are just another person walking down the streets and viewing whatever you stumble upon. There are plenty of tours within neighborhoods of different economic value the world over, but these tours are scrutinized because the people touring are as wealthy, or less wealthy, than the people living there. I don't think that a poor community changes this dynamic in an immoral way, as the perceptions of which group is superior come from the own minds of those who feel uncomfortable with it.

 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 2014 9:41 AM

This article rises in interesting question.  Are tours of slums exploitive or beneficial to the slum dwellers?  On the one hand the tours could feel like exploitation and the tourist is viewing attractions at a “zoo”, on the other hand it brings people far removed from slum life in contact with it and can change people’s point of view on the slums.  It can be beneficial if the tour guides donate money to the slums or jobs are sought by slum dwellers to become tour guides.  The question is should slums be hidden away from view or opened up to tourists so that they can see the hardships first hand.  I think that this is an issue that is not clearly black or white; there are many shades of gray involved in this issue.

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Wealth Inequality in America

Infographics on the distribution of wealth in America, highlighting both the inequality and the difference between our perception of inequality and the actua...

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Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, March 6, 2013 2:36 PM

Des Amériques: les Etats Unis. 

Jennifer S. Hong's curator insight, December 27, 2013 3:39 PM

"In a country well governed, poverty is somehing to be ashamed of. In a country badly governed, wealth is something to be ashamed of." -Confucius.

Luke Walker's curator insight, October 5, 2014 9:17 AM

Mind blowing and utterly ridiculous.

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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2014 2:44 PM

It is very sad that people have to move to a polluted, crowded mess of a place in order to get a better life. The man says at the end that if they can make it work in Dhaka, they could make it work in any city but the beginning is too monumental to get over. I think that maybe some government control over the outer limits of the city and offering a place nearby with some resources may allow more control over the growth of the city at least temporarily.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

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A Life Revealed

A Life Revealed | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Seventeen years after she stared out from the cover of National Geographic, a former Afghan refugee comes face-to-face with the world once more.

 

The original cover is one of the more famous National Geographic photos of all time, and yet the woman in the photograph has not lived a life as though millions of people could recognize her eyes.  This is her story. 


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Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 22, 2014 1:17 PM

This is an iconic image that we have all seen.In 1984 a picture of a young Afghan refugee was taken and in June 1985 it was placed on the cover of National Geographic Magazine. 17 years later in 2002 the young woman was tracked down.During this visit a recent image was captured (the first and last time she was photographer was that day in 1984). Her name is Sharbat Gula and she never knew the impact her photo had made. So cutoff from the modern world void of most of her identity she did not even know how old she was.When the photo was taken she was in a refugee camp ,along with the remnants of her family that had survived the Afghan war.In 2002 when a search was assembled to find the woman with the piercing green eyes , the National Geographic organization did not know if she was still alive.After passing around her photo they were able to locate Sharbat .Reluctant to be caught talking to foreigners and uneasy about taking another photo National Geographic explained to the woman how she had inspired people to help her country. Having considered that she was  helping her people Sharbat agreed. National Geographic also helped to provide her family with much needed healthcare.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 3, 2014 1:58 PM

You can see in this woman's face that the years have been hard for her living as refugee. Although this seems like National Geographic giving themselves a pat on the back it is important to remember that this women became a national symbol for refugees and yet her life did not improve and furthermore she had no idea that her picture was so well known.

David Lizotte's curator insight, February 27, 6:36 PM

I never would have imagined the "Afghan girl" being alive. It's amazing how National Geographic was able to catch up and speak with her and photograph her. This demonstrates the pure professionalism and global outreach national geographic has. 

One of the things I am most thankful about is that I do not live in a war torn society. Being separated from my family, forced to flee and become a refugee is a horrid way of life that I know I would struggle to endure. Some Afghanistan people have been doing this for over twenty years. 

One time I was having a discussion with my friend. We talking about America and the westernized part of the world. He and I agreed how lucky we were to be born in America. We were born white males in the United States of America. We could have been born a woman living in Iran or Iraq, or even as a little rural Afghan boy whom would eventually be taken and abused by theTaliban. We kept going on with different scenarios and different countries. 

Want I want for people to realize is how advanced the United States of America is. Yes, we have our problems... but non comparable to other nations. Look at nations such as Afghanistan, Iraq, The Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Uganda. These are first world nations which have war torn regions occupied by terrorists of all sorts. They also have little to no functioning government, although Afghanistan is improving. Even second world nations, although developing at a steady pace are plagued with an exponential amount of violent crimes and corruption. South Africa would be a prime example. 

Its amazing to read about the "Afghan girl"(s) or better yet Sharbat Gula. After all she has gone through she still has hope for her younger children. After enduring such a life of foul experiences she is still able to place all her faith into Allah and hope for the best for her children. It is also neat to see her place such a high level of importance on education. Education is the foundation for all development. 

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The Ones Left Behind: Urban Poor Pushed Out As ...

The Ones Left Behind: Urban Poor Pushed Out As ... | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Fast economic growth across the African continent can worsen living conditions for slum dwellers. (RT @ibgeography: Economic Growth In African Cities Like Lagos, Nairobi And Addis Ababa Paints The Urban Poor Into...
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Inequality and the Gini Coefficient

Inequality and the Gini Coefficient | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Think everyone should just pull themselves up by their bootstraps? Try this one on for size.

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Heidi Hutchison's curator insight, October 12, 2013 1:46 PM

Just incredibly awesome, but so, so sadly true.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:00 PM

Educating in poverty

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, October 16, 2013 7:47 AM

Do you find this information surprising?

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Vegan food truck makes rounds in 'food deserts'

Vegan food truck makes rounds in 'food deserts' | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Baruch Ben-Yehudah is tackling Prince George’s County’s "food desert" problem. His vegan food truck delivers nourishment to neighborhoods lacking fresh groceries.

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nicole Musset's curator insight, September 14, 2013 1:55 PM

la terre peut offrir de la nourriture à tous ses habitants;mais les interets personnels,la recherche de profits et l'absence de plus en plus grande de conscience "écolologique"....une personne comme Baruch Ben Yehuda est tres importante pour ceux qui souffrent du manque de ressources.

Patricia Stitson's curator insight, September 20, 2013 10:38 PM

After having just driven across country this year I am very in touch with the fact that this model needs to be replicated across the US.

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, October 24, 2013 1:03 PM

This food truck is bringing healthy, vegan food, to food deserts. A food desert is a place where healthy food is not accesable to the population, which is always impoverished. These people typically rely on unhealthy/cheap foods that are high in fats, preservatives, and sugars. This leads to tremendous health issues for these populations. Sure, this food truck is making a profit but it is also providing a wonderful service to the community, exposure to healthy foods and an alternative to the norm.

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T-Shirt Travels

When filmmaker Shantha Bloemen was stationed in a remote village in Zambia as a worker with an international aid organization, she had to adjust to living in a different culture. But one thing struck her as oddly familiar: almost everyone in the village wore secondhand clothing from the West. Bloemen began to imagine stories about the people who used to wear the clothing, wondering if the original owners had any idea that the castoffs they had given to charities ended up being sold to Africans half a world away.


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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, July 19, 2013 9:48 AM

It's fascinating to look at the effects of globalization, and a great look at how economies change.  When people in the Western world drop a bag of clothes off at a charity, I doubt we think they'd end up in a village in Africa. Warning:  it does get a little preachy at the end. 

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:44 PM

Is direct aid a good thing or not? How does secondhand clothing impact local economies?

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:57 PM

Westernization is a popular theme thats happening in the East. Even though people don't know it, the clothes they give away may be some that are taken to places like Africa. Hand-me-downs are popular in the U.S. but even more so in Africa. The t-shirt you give away to someone might end up across the world. Who knows.

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My escape from North Korea

"As a child growing up in North Korea, Hyeonseo Lee thought her country was 'the best on the planet.' It wasn't until the famine of the 90s that she began to to wonder. She escaped the country at 14, to begin a life in hiding, as a refugee in China. Hers is a harrowing, personal tale of survival and hope."


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윤지현's curator insight, November 6, 2014 6:59 PM

I have ever met a person who escaped from North Korea. Her story was like a very scary movie. If I become a teacher in the future, I will do my best to a student from North Korea.

서병기's curator insight, November 6, 2014 7:00 PM

Because of the tragedies of history, there are still scattered family both in South and North Korea. Please hope for the unification of the Korean Peninsula.

Julia Kang's curator insight, November 6, 2014 8:45 PM

So many North Koreans are suffering from poverty. They do not have any food and we should pay more attention to them. This video was quite interesting!

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Economic Inequality

Economic Inequality | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 20, 2013 3:48 PM

Make your own conclusions...

Tony Hall's curator insight, February 20, 2013 11:44 PM

Really good series of infographics on unequal distribution of wealth in the world. Perfect for teaching IB Geography Disparities in Wealth topic.

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Global food crisis

Global food crisis | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Climate change, changing diets and a growing global population has pushed food security to the top of the international agenda.

 

Food problems are fundamentally geographic.  Understanding local economics, agriculture and development all play a critical role in contextualizing place-based shortages.  This interactive media guide highlights where these issues are the most problematic. 


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Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 10, 2013 12:39 PM

Neo-Malthusian point of view?

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Man-Made Cities and Natural Disasters

Man-Made Cities and Natural Disasters | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Patrick assesses the future of world order, state sovereignty, and multilateral cooperation.

 

The 21st century is the dawn of a new era in human history: more people on Earth live in cities than in the countryside.  The impacts of this new basic fact are far-reaching.  One of those is that cities that are in particular environments are more prone to certain natural disasters and will be increasingly vulnerable as their populations increase (especially megacities in the developing world).


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