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An Insider's View Of 19th-Century Paris

An Insider's View Of 19th-Century Paris | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"Charles Marville photographed Paris' transition from medieval hodgepodge to modern metropolis.  Marville made more than 425 photographs of the narrow streets and crumbling buildings of premodern Paris, including this view from the top of Rue Champlain in 1877-1878."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 1, 2013 9:34 AM

This NPR podcast adds some great insight into Charles Marville's 19th century photography currently on display at the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C.  The urban transformations designed by Haussmann made Paris the global capital of modernity and the many cities around the world copied the principles of Haussmannization.  A photographic glimpse into Paris before and during these changes that brought about social upheaval is a marvelous tool for an historical geographic analysis of urbanization.  

   

Tags: urban, historical, Paris, placeFrancepodcastimages.

Kevin Barker's comment, October 6, 2013 8:38 AM
Little blurb at the top of the link for the gallery :) "Notice: During the federal government shutdown, the offices and all premises of the National Gallery of Art and its Sculpture Garden are closed to the public, and all public programs are canceled. Employees will not have access to their e-mail or voicemail accounts during the shutdown."
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Border Walls

Border Walls | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"Geographer Reece Jones discusses his recent book Border Walls, examining the history of how and why societies have chosen to literally wall themselves apart.  He gives a brief history of political maps, how international lines reshape landscapes, and how the trend towards increased border wall construction contrasts with the view of a “borderless” world under globalization."


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Darius Kidd's comment, August 27, 2013 7:37 AM
Wow....
Darius Kidd's comment, August 27, 2013 7:37 AM
Wow... your comment is really long Chris.........
Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 6:00 AM
listening to some of the podcast you can get an in-depth synopsis of this. the walls that divide our countries and even towns over time have all the criteria and/or reasoning. Great Wall of China to keep invaders from starting war, Berlin Wall to divide german supporters of war, America/Mexican boarder is to keep illegal immigrants from coming, fence in your moms backyard is to keep neighbors/animals out of yard. Walls all have the same concept of avoiding war, trespassers and privacy. this is seen in not only everyday living but in military use as well.
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Turning A Boom Town Into A Real Town

Turning A Boom Town Into A Real Town | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Thousands of workers have flooded into the town. But they're reluctant to call it home.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 22, 2013 8:24 AM

This oil boom is visible from space; it has created a real estate market where a one-bedroom apartment goes for $2100 a month (census map showing population increase -slide 4).  Still, the overwhelmingly male population that works here is not willing to move their families with them and truly put down some roots.  Some fear a potential "bust" on this economic prosperity and others don't see the amenities that encourage lasting settlement growth (schools, parks, cultural events, etc.).  The city of Williston, North Dakota "feels like a frontier town" and will build a huge recreational center and other things to entice these temporary workers to become permanent residents.  More than just jobs are needed to made a city attractive to potential migrants.  

 

Tags: migration, podcast, urban.

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A Nation Of Meat Eaters: See How It All Adds Up

Americans eat more meat than almost anyone else in the world, but habits are starting to change. This may be in part because of health and environmental concerns. We explore some of the meat trends and changes in graphs and charts.

 

Often we hear about the dietary impact of meat consumption at the personal scale, but what are the environmental impacts of heavy meat consumption on a global scale?  Even more telling than the podcast are the charts and infographics that are connected to this article.  Not all meats have the same environmental impact (beef is much less environmentally efficient than chicken, pork or turkey).   As globalization has spread, American cultural preferences have changed worldwide taste preferences.  As the global population rises, the impact of meat consumption is now a major environmental concern. 


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In Kenya, Using Tech To Put An 'Invisible' Slum On The Map

In Kenya, Using Tech To Put An 'Invisible' Slum On The Map | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
A billion people worldwide live in slums, largely invisible to city services and governments — but not to satellites.

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John Blunnie's curator insight, July 28, 2013 10:11 AM

Great how tech and globalization can help represed people in other countries.

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 6, 2013 2:07 PM

The slum-mapping movement began in India almost a decade ago and migrated to africa, the idea of this is to make slums a reality to people who have never set foot in one before. The maps can be used in court to stop evictions or simply to raise awarance. I think this idea is on the right track of what needs to be done. These people need help and so many people incuding the governement pretend they arent their but with these maps as proof they can no longer do that.    

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 7:24 AM

Slums and squatter settlements are a problem that a lot of the developing world has to deal with.  The unsafe and unsanitary buildings cause headaches and problems for the leaders of the cities they surround.  This story is hopeful in that the city did manage to bring a water line out to get clean water to the people living in this area.  Perhaps this will lead to a better quality of life of the inhabitants of this particular slum.  Also the project of mapping such areas can be a useful tool for city planners to better regulate these areas and help the people that live there.,

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For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price'

For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price' | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"China's one-child only policy and historic preference for boys has led to a surplus of marriageable Chinese men. Young women are holding out for better apartments, cars and the like from potential spouses...30 to 48 percent of the real estate appreciation in 35 major Chinese cities is directly linked to a man's need to acquire wealth — in the form of property — to attract a wife."

 

Tags: gender, folk culture, China, podcast, culture, population.


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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 7:54 AM

With the new gender imbalance, it is interesting that Chinese families now see boys as the gender that will cost them more money in the long run, it used to be the girl that was a finical burden.  This is a big change in thinking from just a generation ago, it will be interesting to see how this plays out in china over time.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 8:11 AM

This article shows how the One Child Policy has skewed the gender balance in China. There is a shortage of young women and, in order to attract a wife, young Chinese men feel the need to acquire more wealth to gain a competitive advantage in a China with a surplus of men. This wealth grab is possibly fueling the housing market in China, but Chinese women are not seeing many benefits for themselves. The wealth of their husbands tends to be left in the husband's name, leaving women out of the growing economy of China.

 

There is another potential issue as well. The Chinese men are taking out loans to pay for inflated housing prices. If the housing market crashes, these marriage seeking men are left with significant debt for apartments which were overvalued to begin with.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:34 PM

This article is recent too which is scary. Men should be able to pick their own brides and money shouldn't be involved. Women shouldn't have to marry someone for the sake of her family but if thats what she wants to do then fine. Different countries operate different ways and in China, this is how they work.

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If Economists Controlled The Borders

If Economists Controlled The Borders | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
What would the perfect immigration system look like? We asked three economists to dream big.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 19, 2013 11:30 AM

This is an intriguing podcast focused on how to best manage national borders if the only goal were to strengthen the economy (they center the conversatri on the United States).  These economists envision plans with more incentives to attract a labor force that is more highly-skilled is crucial to having a rational migration policy.  How how you manage the borders if you were in charge?  How would your plan strengthen the country?