AP Human GeographyNRHS
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Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Rust Belt Rebirth Through Gentrification?

It’s become difficult to afford urban living in places like San Francisco, New York or even Portland, but there is an alternative. In Rust Belt cities like Pittsburgh, Buffalo and Cincinnati, you can buy or rent for about 1/10th the price.

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Nicholas Widaman's curator insight, September 7, 2015 4:54 PM

This clip talks about how people are "migrating" to more industrial based cities because the rent is so cheap.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 4:24 PM

I like this idea of gentrification, meaning you rebuild and renovate something that is old, dilapidated, and really not worth fixing up. Renovating places like this brings a whole new atmosphere to the area, it brings it to life, a life it once had that it lost. Renovating these areas is also probably good, because it raises the value of the area and higher value areas may just attract people to come see. Also, fixing up old restaurants, bars or other forms of entertainment might be enticing to people that are local and far away to check out what is new. Also, in general it will bring new economy to the area, renovating means construction jobs, finished construction jobs lead to new jobs because something can open in a newly renovated building and that new business will need employees. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 27, 12:39 PM
unit 7
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Placeness

Placeness | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
I understand placeness to mean everything that has to do with place, so this website is intended to be a sort of place encyclopedia. I hope that it will in due course provide an overview of the myriad ideas and experiences of place and places. Places are directly experienced aspects of the world and are full with diverse meanings, objects, and ongoing activities.

 

Tags: neighborhood, landscape, place. 


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 10, 2015 10:57 PM

Interesting reading

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In Pictures: Crackdown in Brazil's favelas

In Pictures: Crackdown in Brazil's favelas | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
The Brazilian government's 'pacification' initiative has led to drug busts and shootouts in Rio's favelas.

 

Just a few months before Rio de Janeiro welcomes visitors for the World Cup, and two years before it hosts the Olympics, security within the city remains a major issue.  The government currently promotes the policy of "pacification", where security forces engage in raids, drug busts, and even gunfights with suspected gang members. This pacification policy is supposed to pave the way for the development of long-neglected favelas in Rio, Brazil's second-biggest city and home to 11 million people.  However, many of the favelas remain in the hands of an army of drug dealers and criminals who are not willing to step down or be pacified.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 2, 2014 9:30 PM

Tags: Brazil, urban, squatter, narcotics, socioeconomic, neighborhood.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 2014 10:41 AM

unit 7

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 2015 6:29 AM

I believe that absolutely no one is surprised that right before an international event, the hosting city is cracking down on its problem areas. I am skeptical of the Brazilin governments  promise to develop the long neglected Favelas. After Rio finishes hosting the 2016 Summer games, the government will once again neglect the Favelas. There will no longer be an incentive for the government to care about the favelas. The eyes of the world will be off the  city and things can return to normal. The only losers in this equation are the actual residents of these slums. Once again the promise of better days will ripped  from them. An added injury is that there informal economy will have been destroyed. While life in an informal economy is hard by any measure, it is still a way of making a living. The increased police presence will destroy that way of life and replace it with empty promises.  

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Mental Maps

Mental Maps | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

Tags: transportation, mapping, place.


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Gary Pascoa's comment, March 1, 2013 9:53 PM
Certainly guilty of this growing up. I have a photogenic memory when it comes to directions and getting around. I think it will only get worse in the future for kids with the advent of GPS who might not take the time to build up a solid understanding of their surroundings.
Conor McCloskey's comment, March 4, 2013 8:37 PM
Proud to say my mental maps are pretty accurate and so are my brothers, however I have two siblings that cannot say the same... I would definitely support the theory that walking through neighborhoods and riding bikes really helped to give me and my brother strong mental maps and geospatial awareness. Also, being a runner has also influenced my mental map making.
Michelle Fowler's curator insight, August 2, 2015 10:54 AM

This comic strip would be funnier if it weren't so true.  Studies have shown that children who are driven everywhere do not have as fully developed mental maps as children who walk through their neighborhoods or ride their bikes.  For some lesson plans on mental maps, click here.   

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Lawns Into Gardens

Lawns Into Gardens | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
There are joys and rewards in growing some of your own crops; there's even beauty.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 31, 2013 11:12 PM

Although a front lawn is not ecologically the best use of urban space, there are strong cultural pressure to conform to that aesthetic ideal.  When individuals choose to grow vegetables and fruit, they often face some push-back from the city or homeowners associations with a different vision on the appropriate use of space.  Some have estimated though, that if we were to convert 10 percent the country's grass lawns to vegetable gardens that they could supply roughly a third of our fresh vegetables. 


Tags: agriculture, food, urban, unit 5 agriculture.

Chris Scott's curator insight, July 14, 2013 10:14 AM

I think that having having an urban garden whether it be in the front yard or the backyard should be a must in every state even if it is a little garden, I think it will make great use of the land.

Drake's curator insight, September 4, 2013 12:11 AM

Yes, I agree, it is an act of bringing nature close to you. 

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Canada: As immigration booms, ethnic enclaves swell and segregate

Canada: As immigration booms, ethnic enclaves swell and segregate | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
More than 600 newcomers per day have arrived in Canada since 2006, and many of them have settled in neighbourhoods like Richmond, B.C.

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 24, 2014 1:15 PM

This article contains details about the Canadian immigrant population boom, mostly from east Asia, which began in the 90's. Unsurprisingly, many of these immigrants settle into communities with others whom share their culture. These Canadian ethnic enclaves differ from those in the US because most immigrants are choosing suburban areas (where the cost of living is lower) rather than being relegated to an urban "ethnictown." However, these enclaves are not entirely a product of economic equality as the average earnings for a recent immigrant are only 61% of a Canadian-born worker, limiting their ability to move elsewhere.

 

Conversely, the immigrant communities which become economically successful are seeing many of their sons and daughters move away to the city or other suburbs as they are more fully integrated into the Canadian culture and if there is no influx of new immigrants into these enclaves they begin to die out. This seems to indicate that long-standing ethnic enclaves are at least partially the product of economic inequality than a desire to preserve culture.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 29, 2014 9:41 AM

This article was interesting because it showed how modern immigration patterns are not that dissimilar from historic patterns.  People come to a new country and they settle in an area that has relatives or familiar people already living there.  The formation of ethnic enclaves is the example.  People are choosing to self-segregate when they immigrate to a new homeland because it is the familiar with in the strange.  Perhaps once the new immigrants have acclimated to Canadian society they may move out of the enclave areas but they also may stay.  It is an interesting example of how people cluster together with similar people when they move to a new country.

Gubert's curator insight, February 11, 2015 5:17 AM

XIPHIAS Immigration is one among the Top Five Immigration Consultants in India according to The siliconindia as Top Five Most Promising Immigration Consultants. www.xiphiasimmigration,com

 

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Amsterdam Canals

It was busy today on the Canals in Amsterdam. Especially at the junction Prinsengracht/Leidsegracht.

 

Tags: Netherlands, transportation, place, neighborhood, landscape, time lapse, video.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 31, 2015 1:32 PM

Could this transportation network and system work everywhere?  If not, geography and place are critical factors to shaping the human landscape. 

John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, August 31, 2015 2:19 PM

Look at how self-organised this works perfectly. It's just a matter of how you can solve things together.

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America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young

America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"Although we seldom think about them this way, most American communities as they exist today were built for the spry and mobile. We've constructed millions of multi-story, single-family homes where the master bedroom is on the second floor, where the lawn outside requires weekly upkeep, where the mailbox is a stroll away. We've designed neighborhoods where everyday errands require a driver's license. We've planned whole cities where, if you don't have a car, it's not particularly easy to walk anywhere — especially not if you move gingerly.

This reality has been a fine one for a younger country. Those multi-story, single-family homes with broad lawns were great for Baby Boomers when they had young families. And car-dependent suburbs have been fine for residents with the means and mobility to drive everywhere. But as the Baby Boomers whose preferences drove a lot of these trends continue to age, it's becoming increasingly clear that the housing and communities we've built won't work very well for the old."


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Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, October 18, 2014 6:48 PM

This is also an issue in Australia where the overwhelming majority of people live in single story dwellings and are very car reliant.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, January 28, 2015 8:59 PM

I can definitely see this as a real problem. Both my Uncle and my Great Uncle moved their condos from ones that had numerous steps to climb to the second floor to more elder-friendly options. My Great Uncle even went a step further to move him and his wife to a senior living community, where there food, entertainment, etc. is all provided within an enclosed neighbourhood with other people of their age group. More of these communities that act like oversized retirement homes could be the answer. They give the illusion of suburban living, something the baby boomers liked, while providing the accessibility they need.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, April 8, 2015 12:27 PM

APHG- HW Option 1

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Street Art Project Maps Rap Lyric Shout Outs Around NYC

Street Art Project Maps Rap Lyric Shout Outs Around NYC | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
If a NYC location got a shout out in some rap lyrics, Jay Shells has probably made a sign out of them and placed it at that specific location for his amazing new project.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 26, 2013 1:51 PM

Street art has a subtle, but powerful connection with place.  How does an art installation alter a neighborhood's sense of place?  How does a place alter the meaning(s) of an art installation?


Tags: art, mapping, NYC, culture, landscape, place, socioeconomic, neighborhood.

bancoideas's curator insight, April 24, 2013 7:59 AM

¿que tal esta idea de arte callejero? Letras de rap y señaléticas de tránsito

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, September 23, 2013 10:28 AM

I just got back at two in the morning from a road trip with one of my cousins to see her sister in Maryland.  It was a fabulous time, and I'd like to point out that we did drive through New York, and caught some glimpses of NYC across the way.  My whole experience on the trip was illuminated by different forms of cultural exposure.  I rarely travel, and it was quite fascinating to see the different locations on the way.  One thing that I noticed was a large presence of graffiti, that completely varied in styles and colors in every city and every state.  It was as if these different people from different places all had different things to say.  The rap lyrics on signs are interesting as well, because these rap lines are not intended to be written on signs, contrasted from graffiti, which is meant to be seen publicly.  The culture in New York is one that includes art and appreciation of art, and these rap lyric signs are both catchy and artsy.  Poetry has long been a way to teach people to remember things- such as in nursery rhymes.  It seems to me that it would be sufficiently easier for a person to remember what avenue they are supposed to meet someone on, by quoting existing rap lyrics that are also present on signs in the area.  These aesthetic embellishments also demonstrate a striving towards a revival of a human blend of Platonic cultural ideas with the presenece of art and poetry in public, and the human imperfection that accompanies rap music with the stigma of sex, drugs, and violence. 

         One of the bad things about the trip was the traffic in New York, but if I had rap lyric signs to read, I really would not have been that bad off.  Some people like to read books or magazines while using the bathroom, and it is becoming increasingly clear that there must be a similar level of tolerance/inclination towards people wanting to read rap lyrics on signs in New York that indicate the areas referred to in song.  There really are very few problems with this, and I am often more offended by the billboards in cities that tell me what religious ideas are right for me to believe, such as the Christ-Supremacist group billboards that tell me Jesus will save me.  I think Kanye West is a slightly more contemporary savior that might be to the liking of the citizens of New York City... At least, in this particular place, during this particular time.

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Replanning Downtown LA

Melani Smith is Director of Planning and Urban Design at downtown Los Angeles based Meléndrez, a landscape architecture, urban planning, and urban design firm. Melani’s…

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 11, 2013 10:08 PM

Changes are afoot to make Downtown LA (the center of a metropolitan area that is notoriously tied to freeways and the private automobile) more walkable and reshape the look and feel to make it more of a neighborhood.  


Tags: Los Angeles, transportation, AAG, urban, planning.

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Canada: As immigration booms, ethnic enclaves swell and segregate

Canada: As immigration booms, ethnic enclaves swell and segregate | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
More than 600 newcomers per day have arrived in Canada since 2006, and many of them have settled in neighbourhoods like Richmond, B.C.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 24, 2014 1:15 PM

This article contains details about the Canadian immigrant population boom, mostly from east Asia, which began in the 90's. Unsurprisingly, many of these immigrants settle into communities with others whom share their culture. These Canadian ethnic enclaves differ from those in the US because most immigrants are choosing suburban areas (where the cost of living is lower) rather than being relegated to an urban "ethnictown." However, these enclaves are not entirely a product of economic equality as the average earnings for a recent immigrant are only 61% of a Canadian-born worker, limiting their ability to move elsewhere.

 

Conversely, the immigrant communities which become economically successful are seeing many of their sons and daughters move away to the city or other suburbs as they are more fully integrated into the Canadian culture and if there is no influx of new immigrants into these enclaves they begin to die out. This seems to indicate that long-standing ethnic enclaves are at least partially the product of economic inequality than a desire to preserve culture.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 29, 2014 9:41 AM

This article was interesting because it showed how modern immigration patterns are not that dissimilar from historic patterns.  People come to a new country and they settle in an area that has relatives or familiar people already living there.  The formation of ethnic enclaves is the example.  People are choosing to self-segregate when they immigrate to a new homeland because it is the familiar with in the strange.  Perhaps once the new immigrants have acclimated to Canadian society they may move out of the enclave areas but they also may stay.  It is an interesting example of how people cluster together with similar people when they move to a new country.

Gubert's curator insight, February 11, 2015 5:17 AM

XIPHIAS Immigration is one among the Top Five Immigration Consultants in India according to The siliconindia as Top Five Most Promising Immigration Consultants. www.xiphiasimmigration,com

 

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Twitter Languages in London

Twitter Languages in London | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

This map is a fantastic geovisualization that maps the spatial patterns of languages used on the social media platform Twitter.  This map was in part inspired by a Twitter map of Europe.  While most cities would be expected to be linguistically homogenous, but London's cosmopolitan nature and large pockets of immigrants influence the distribution greatly.

   

Tags: social media, language, neighborhood, visualization, cartography.


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Betty Denise's comment, November 7, 2012 1:13 PM
Thank you – again – for your tremendous partnership
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!