AP Human GeographyNRHS
811 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What happened when Portugal decriminalized drugs?

"For 20 years The Economist has led calls for a rethink on drug prohibition. This film looks at new approaches to drugs policy, from Portugal to Colorado. 'Drugs: War or Store?' kicks off our new 'Global Compass' series, examining novel approaches to policy problems."


Tags: Portugal, Europe, political, popular culture, narcotics.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kevin Arboleda's curator insight, September 9, 2015 3:19 PM

It is crazy to think that Drugs such as Marijuana can create such a major market and a vast amount of money that can help out the economy. Governments should begin to control these certain drugs like Marijuana that are not as damaging as drugs like cocaine. They should then allow it to be sold to people, obviously with caution and restrictions. Colorado seems to be doing just perfectly fine.

Lon Woodbury's curator insight, September 9, 2015 9:15 PM

The other side of the war on drugs. -Lon

Penrith Farms's curator insight, September 11, 2015 1:21 PM

Very important insight

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

A map of the U.S. depicting overall drug test positive rates

A map of the U.S. depicting overall drug test positive rates | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Drug Testing Index; A map of the U.S. depicting overall drug test positive rates

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

In Pictures: Crackdown in Brazil's favelas

In Pictures: Crackdown in Brazil's favelas | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
The Brazilian government's 'pacification' initiative has led to drug busts and shootouts in Rio's favelas.

 

Just a few months before Rio de Janeiro welcomes visitors for the World Cup, and two years before it hosts the Olympics, security within the city remains a major issue.  The government currently promotes the policy of "pacification", where security forces engage in raids, drug busts, and even gunfights with suspected gang members. This pacification policy is supposed to pave the way for the development of long-neglected favelas in Rio, Brazil's second-biggest city and home to 11 million people.  However, many of the favelas remain in the hands of an army of drug dealers and criminals who are not willing to step down or be pacified.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 2, 2014 9:30 PM

Tags: Brazil, urban, squatter, narcotics, socioeconomic, neighborhood.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 2014 10:41 AM

unit 7

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 2015 6:29 AM

I believe that absolutely no one is surprised that right before an international event, the hosting city is cracking down on its problem areas. I am skeptical of the Brazilin governments  promise to develop the long neglected Favelas. After Rio finishes hosting the 2016 Summer games, the government will once again neglect the Favelas. There will no longer be an incentive for the government to care about the favelas. The eyes of the world will be off the  city and things can return to normal. The only losers in this equation are the actual residents of these slums. Once again the promise of better days will ripped  from them. An added injury is that there informal economy will have been destroyed. While life in an informal economy is hard by any measure, it is still a way of making a living. The increased police presence will destroy that way of life and replace it with empty promises.