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AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa

AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Despite the gains, more Africans still die from Malaria even as the spotlight remains firmly fixed on HIV/AIDS.

Via Seth Dixon
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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 2014 10:41 AM

This infographic shows how pervasive disease is in Africa. Though HIV gets a lot of attention, malaria and tuberculosis are just as prevalent as HIV/AIDS. The attention given to HIV/AIDS is reflected in the amount of aid sent to Africa, with a significant amount more being spent to halt the spread of HIV. These efforts are not entirely in vain as there have been decreases for all three diseases, but the funding necessary to make serious progress not on its way.

 

Though there is an even greater need to fight malaria, more international aid for HIV/AIDS is likely because most of the countries sending aid are not as familiar with malaria and HIV/AIDS has become sensationalized.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:52 PM

Disease is a global problem. Not having enough resources to keep diseases such as malaria out of Africa is unfortunate. People are dying every day and in efforts to save these people, it still can't be done. In the past, AIDS was the main disease that killed people in Africa. More recently, malaria is working its way through humans and killing them more than AIDS.

TavistockCollegeGeog's curator insight, July 4, 2014 7:41 AM

Fantastic infographic on health risks in Africa. Particular focus on infectious diseases.

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The Spread of AIDS

The Spread of AIDS | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
A handful of AIDS cases were first recognized in the U.S. at the beginning of the 1980s. By 1990, there was a pandemic. In 1997, more than 3 million people became newly infected with HIV.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 3, 2013 11:57 AM

The spread of AIDS/HIV since the 1980s has varied greatly over time and space.  The red lines represent Sub-Saharan countries and the dark blue line on this interactive is the regional average of Sub-Saharan African countries.  The regional trend was on the rise at the end of the 20th century, but is now on a slight decline (but still an major impact on the continent).  Countries such as Botswana and Zimbabwe have made some significant strides in limiting the spread of AIDS (Zimbabwe is the country that 'peaked' in 1997 and has had the steepest decline).


Tags: Africa, medical, development, infographic, diffusion.

Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 23, 2014 12:36 PM

Lack of education, social stigma, and poverty all play into the role of the spread of HIV in the sub sahara African region. This is a stoppable disease, but only with understanding of how it is passed, and education on how to stop the spread. Condoms, monogamy, good hygiene around bodily fluids and education on intravenous drug use are the only ways to slow the progress of AIDS.

 

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:07 PM

you always hear about the aids problem in africa but this graph really puts it into context and you can see how huge of a problem this is. obviously better doctors/education is needed in these places to halt this pandemic

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How Pandemics Spread

View Full Lesson on TED-ED BETA: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-pandemics-spread In our increasingly globalized world, a single infected person can board a pl...

 

This is a great demonstration of why spatial thinking is critical to so many fields, including medicine.

 

Tags: diffusion, medical, historical, spatial.


Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 23, 2014 11:33 AM

Unit 1 nature and perspectives of geography

This video is about how a world wide pandemic can occur and has occurred in history. I thought this was interesting because it  spoke of many specific events like the black death and the 2010 cholera outbreak in haiti, gave detailed information, and was very informal.

This relates to unit 1 because it shows how pandemics and epidemics occur in a detailed way. It also shows how geography has related to epidemic outbreaks by showing disease spread maps and showing how doctors used this to solve the issue of it.

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The Greek island of old age

The Greek island of old age | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
The inhabitants of a small Greek island live on average 10 years longer than the rest of western Europe. So what's the secret to long life in Ikaria?

Via Seth Dixon
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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 1, 2014 9:09 PM

According to this article, The people of the small Greek Island of Ikaria have a life expectancy that is 10 years longer than any other part of the world. It is attributed  to the nutritious diet that the citizens have and the lack of influence that the outside world has on other places. With less environmental factors to harm it, Ikaria is one of the most geographically advantageous places to live a healthy life.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 11:07 AM

Scientists are always coming across new evidence proving that specific lifestyles, foods, and activities are what allow some to live longer than others, but maybe we need to look at life length at a geographic level. These places where people live longer, healthier lives must have some common threads linking them. It could be similar cultural constructs that are endemic to these places, promoting healthy habits, a sense of community, and overall peaceful lifestyles. 

 

Oddly enough, most of his daily routines, such as drinking tea, using local honey, drinking wine, and leading an active lifestyle, are touted by different scientists and salespeople as to keys to longevity. I think, that these routines combined with a great sense of community, lack of stress, and happiness lead to long life. The community on this island is very close knit, and many people live happily. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 12, 2015 11:06 AM

I really believe that the clean air of this island could have something to do with the life expectancy being higher.  The less toxins you breathe in the less of a chance you will have to developing cancers and other diseases.  

 

Now as to how this gentleman defeated lung cancer after moving from the U.S. to Ikaria is a whole other story.  Maybe the wine did help.  Maybe leaving a dirty and toxin-ridden environment helped kill the cancer.  Bare minimum, this article definitely shines the light on the air-quality in certain parts of the world.

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At Year's End, News of a Global Health Success

At Year's End, News of a Global Health Success | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
The stunning drop in global child mortality is proof that poor countries are not doomed to eternal misery. Here's how it happened.

Via Seth Dixon
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diana buja's curator insight, December 27, 2012 3:44 AM
Seth Dixon, Ph.D.'s insight:

Global health has substantially improved in the last two decades.  This article explores the improvements in global health that have been made this year, and the attached interactive feature allows users to explore the changes in global health risks.  Click here for the Guardian's version of this same data and interactive.  

 

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Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, December 27, 2012 8:24 PM

Child mortality info