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Why Shanghai's first American Chinese restaurant is taking off

Why Shanghai's first American Chinese restaurant is taking off | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
The BBC's Celia Hatton finds out why one restaurant in Shanghai is serving up American-style Chinese food

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 24, 2015 2:40 PM

This article covers the same topic as this NPR podcast, the success of an American-style Chinese restaurant in China.  Some joked that it was akin to selling snow to Eskimos, but there is a local appetite among the youth that want to experiment with the 'foreign,' but also with American ex-pats that crave a taste of home. This is just one more delicious example of how globalization impacts cultural products and how globalization flows in many unexpected directions.  For more, see this TED talk on the search for the origins of General Tso's chicken, and this podcast of the historical geographies of the fortune cookie.    

 

Tags: foodglobalization, culture, China, East Asia, podcast.

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Why Indians love cricket

Why Indians love cricket | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
TO OUTSIDERS, the magnitude of Indians' love for cricket is as incomprehensible as its feverish intensity. On February 4th India awarded the Bharat Ratna, its highest civilian honour, to Sachin Tendulkar, a recently retired batsman. Millions in India, a country of 1.3 billion people and only one nationally-popular game, celebrated wildly. When India's national side plays a big game, an estimated 400m watch on television. Yet cricket's take-off in India is a highly improbable development. The game is demanding to play properly, requiring space, a good turf pitch and expensive equipment—which only a relative handful of Indian cricketers have access to. Most will never strap on pads or bowl with a leather ball. So why do they so love the game?

 

Tags: sport, popular culture, culture, development, India, South Asia, globalization, empire.


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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 10, 2015 6:19 AM

Why do Indians love Cricket? As with most modern day countries, colonialism has something to do with it. However, the British never intended to promote Cricket in India. It was the local elite of India that first pushed to incorporate the game into Indian culture. Desperate to gain the prestige that the British attached to the game, the elite began the practice of playing Cricket in India. In the years following independence, the game has spread to the other classes of Indian society. The game has become the national pastime for the nation.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:52 AM

this is an interesting reason for a game to spread. it was a game played by the elite, so it never really lost the appeal of being a sport of the rich.

 

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:30 PM

i have tried to watch a cricket match before but it seemed so odd, i dont really fully understand the game but the people playing (especially inians) were playing more than a game, for them it seemed like they were playing for their country and it was a great honor to them. unlike a sport like soccer where people play for other countries teams.

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Fried Chicken In Ulan Bator: KFC To Open In Mongolia

Fried Chicken In Ulan Bator: KFC To Open In Mongolia | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Would you like home-style biscuits or mashed potatoes to go with your yurt?

No country is out of reach for global food brands these days, and

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 13, 2013 1:59 PM

Globalization has a long reach indeed. 

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 10, 2013 11:53 AM

Diffusion....Globalization....transnational corporations Oh My!

CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 2014 7:14 PM

Cultural diffusion in action.

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China's generation gap

China's generation gap | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"Chinese parents bemoan the laziness and greed of their children, but this generation of young people has had enough.  Parents who spent their own twenties labouring on remote farms have children who measure their world in malls, iPhones, and casual dates."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 13, 2013 8:01 PM

China rapid economic ascent has been astounding, but it has led to some interesting cultural dynamics as parents and children are literally from different worlds. 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 8:06 PM

APHG-U2

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How Vietnam became a coffee giant

How Vietnam became a coffee giant | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"Think of coffee and you will probably think of Brazil, Colombia, or maybe Ethiopia. But the world's second largest exporter today is Vietnam. How did its market share jump from 0.1% to 20% in just 30 years, and how has this rapid change affected the country?"

 


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Chris Costa's curator insight, November 9, 2015 2:20 PM

Globalization is a polarizing topic, and that is embodied very well in this article concerning the economic ascendancy of the Vietnamese economy. Globalization is responsible for the colonization of the nation, and the subsequent century of bloodshed between opposing nationalist and international forces. Global trade, however, and the introduction of coffee in Vietnam by the French, is responsible for Vietnam's current economic boost. 30 years ago, 60% of Vietnamese lived below the national poverty line; today, that number has fallen to below 10%, an extraordinary achievement. How? Vietnam has emerged as a major player in the global coffee trade, its market share rising from 0.1% to 20% in the same time period, ensuring mass employment for the first time since colonization. Is the system perfect? No- we have learned that diversified economies are integral to development, and nations too dependent on a single sector of the economy can face ruin when confronted with fluctuating market prices, supply, and global demand. There could be improvements to the existing trade, and the government could be doing even more for those who fall below the poverty line- the average Vietnamese worker still only makes a paltry $1300 annual salary- but this is a major step in the right direction. Hopefully this trend can continue, and Vietnam can continue its rise and become a fully developed nation, much like its predecessors in Asia, South Korea, China, and Japan.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 8:59 PM

Well for one thing this gives a chance for growth at the expense of others. I noticed though that the numbers stated that since the end of the war in 1975 the poverty level has decreased from 60% to 10%. But what about the possibility of corruption? environmentally there appears to be  deforestation, lots of water usage therefore future water shortage.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:29 PM
Typically I would always associate coffee and coffee beans coming from Spanish speaking countries and I would associate Asian countries with drinking tea. This threw me for a little twist, The Vietnamese do drink coffee though. Coffee was introduced to Vietnam in the 19th century by the French. A majority of their coffee beans are exported since the country needs money. After the Vietnam war had ended, their communist ally, The Soviet Union did nothing to help the crippled country. Agriculture was a disaster, bu the government decided to take a risk in the 80s with growing coffee. It was a success and kept increasing 20%-30% every year in the 90s. Now it employs over two million people. Even major brands like Nestle has coffee bean growing rights there.
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Moroccans and Fast Food | Southmoore AP Human G...

Moroccans and Fast Food | Southmoore AP Human G... | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
It is a quarter to three in that place where the harmonious sound of knives and forks mixed with the delicious savory of food tempting consumers to order more. This is happening in a fast food restaurant in the center of Rabat.
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Mash Donalds? Iranians Copy American Fast-Food Brands

Mash Donalds? Iranians Copy American Fast-Food Brands | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

If you wander through the streets of Tehran, you might find that faux McDonald's, or a Pizza Hat.


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Ship-Shipping Ships

Ship-Shipping Ships | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"This is a ship-shipping ship, shipping shipping ships."  http://geographyeducation.org/2013/10/14/ship-shipping-ships/

 


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jim dzialo's curator insight, October 16, 2013 2:54 PM

Pretty sure that doesn't fit in the panama canal

 

L.Long's curator insight, February 16, 2014 4:28 AM

The two industries that are the real backbone of globalization are transportation and communication.  What has accelerated the pace of global interconnectedness is the scale of these devices and their ubiquity in facilitating massive global commerce.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:20 AM

The two industries that are the real backbone of globalization are transportation and communication.  What has accelerated the pace of global interconnectedness is the scale of these devices and their ubiquity in facilitating massive global commerce. Economies of scale infuse our transportation and communicating technologies, boosting the diffusion of countless other technologies. China's transportation infrastructure, for example has undergone some amazing physical transformations that have made their economic growth possible.  If, however, you only want to laugh at the tongue-twister of ship-shipping ships shipping shipping ships,  this is the internet meme for you. 


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Currywurst on the Street

Currywurst on the Street | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Michael Slackman, The Times's Berlin Bureau Chief, looks into the city's obsession with a popular street dish that combines sausage, ketchup and curry powder.

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Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 10:44 AM

This is a stride of different cultures,  a little ancient and modern culture. When the Turkish immigrant came over to Germany because they needed workers (Germans stopped having so many kids) it help form the curry wurst. They also use American ketchup because Americans were over there for the war and they ate this too. The curry powder came way of United Kingdom. Basically the population learned from all these cultures and  created one huge hit. 

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, October 26, 2014 11:23 AM

Unit 3

How are these 5 major elements of culture seen in this video?

1. Culture traits

2. Diffusion patters

3.Acculturation, assimilation, and multiculturalism

4. Culture region, vernacular region, cultural hearth

5. Globalization and the effects of technology on culture.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:26 PM

unit 3

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Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World

Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Investigate for yourself the mechanisms of global trade

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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 7:57 PM
This is a pretty informative interactive map of the largest ports in the world. Very well put together to help some understandings of trade. Most of the ports are on the East coast of China which is the Pacific Sea. The reason there are probably so many here in China is because they make a large amount of product that needs to be shipped worldwide. They are like the leading country in imports and exports to other global or major global markets.
Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 2016 7:40 PM

This more clearly shows the regional restructuring of the global economy than just about anything I've ever seen, especially manufacturing.  The 8 largest and busiest ports in the world are all in East or Southeast Asia (and 11 of the top 13).  A quick glance at the historical charts will show that most of these were relatively minor ports that have exploded in the last 20 years.  


New Jersey at 24

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, East Asia, industry, economic.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:22 AM

This more clearly shows the regional restructuring of the global economy than just about anything I've ever seen, especially manufacturing.  The 8 largest and busiest ports in the world are all in East or Southeast Asia (and 11 of the top 13).  A quick glance at the historical charts will show that most of these were relatively minor ports that have exploded in the last 20 years.  

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, East Asia, industry, economic.

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Time Zones

Time Zones | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 27, 2013 2:07 PM

Coordinating a meeting across time zones can be confusion logistical task and one that people rarely can do off the top of their head or consulting some resources.  It is, however, fundamentally a geographic task.  Our friends at the Global Catastrophic Risk Institute put together this collection of 5 maps (and this time zone converter) to help global collaboration.

Louis Culotta's comment, February 27, 2013 3:16 PM
good info...I use a app on my phone most of the time for this info.
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EU horse meat scandal exposes dangers of globalism

EU horse meat scandal exposes dangers of globalism | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
When horse meat was discovered in beef hamburgers in Ireland last month, governments, corporations and regulators assured a panicked public that it was complete

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, unit 5 agriculture, globalization, agribusiness.


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chris tobin's comment, February 28, 2013 3:44 PM
Yes the industry is all about money. The US needs to change their ways, especially in the beef and poultry business. Its mass production, inhumane to animals, and unhealthy .
Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 7, 2013 8:12 PM

What trends in agribusiness are conveyed in this map?

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 5:30 PM

Why would someone want to do that to a horse? Horses are a great addition to the world because they can come in handy when it comes to pulling cargo and other objects also. Horses are having helped people for hundreds of years. I would go crazy if I found out I was eating horse meet. I am very surprised that those people from Ireland did not find out. There should really be an organization that checks the meet before it goes to supermarkets and other places. 

 

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38 maps that explain the global economy

38 maps that explain the global economy | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Commerce knits the modern world together in a way that nothing else quite does. Almost anything you own these days is the result of a complicated web of global interactions. And there's no better way to depict those interactions than some maps.

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Mr. Lavold's curator insight, September 28, 2014 7:05 PM

Many ideological issues  relate to economics - and many economic issues related to geography. Take a look at these maps and see if they help you understand the global economy and where Canada fits in. Consider how different ideologies might view these maps and the data that they contain.

Maghfir Rafsan Jamal's curator insight, September 28, 2014 10:45 PM

I find a treasure.. :D

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 2014 11:14 PM

Unit 6

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Muslim beauty pageant challenges Miss World contest

Muslim beauty pageant challenges Miss World contest | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"Muslim women from six countries defy western beauty ideals, emphasize spirituality.  Organizers of the event said they wanted to show Muslim women there is an alternative to the idea of beauty put forward by the British-run Miss World pageant. They also stress that opposition to the pageant can be expressed non-violently." 


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Rawr_adventuretime's comment, October 3, 2013 1:27 PM
This is social because the gender relations is women defying ideas of beauty and expressing beauty through spirit instead of body and looks c:
Mrs. B's curator insight, October 5, 2013 9:34 AM

What do you think?

Hannah Hitchcock's curator insight, December 13, 2013 1:54 PM

This article is a really good example on how beauty is a cultural perception. American pleople have a skewed idea of beauty, those shown above not being in that category. In other countries, these women might be extreamly beautiful, but the American perception doesn't believe the same things.  

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As US demographics change, so does the menu

As US demographics change, so does the menu | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
MIAMI (AP) — Salsa overtaking ketchup as America's No. 1 condiment was just the start.


These days, tortillas outsell burger and hot dog buns; sales of tortilla chips trump potato chips; and tacos and burritos have become so ubiquitously "American," most people don't even consider them ethnic.  Welcome to the taste of American food in 2013.


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Sarah Ziolkowski's curator insight, December 14, 2013 12:11 PM

This article  showcases the acculturation of Hispanic foods into the American menu, and applies  to the  concepts of culture unit. It focuses on the ever increasing sale of tortillas, salsa, and tortilla chips, and also the adaptation of Hispanic flavors and food into Classic American restaurants. This trend promotes predictions that tortilla chips will outsell potato chips, while salsa already outsells ketchup. Every community has proof of this, as ethnic foods begin to make their way out of the international food aisle and into the aisles of bread and condiments. 

megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 12:20 PM

This article talks about how as we become more diverse in the United States our taste has changed as well. Alot of Latin Food has become the most popular food in stores or markets. Tortillas and salsa outselling potato chips or hot dogs. Times are changing as well as the demographic and its traditions.

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Meet the Amish 1 of 4 - First experience on an aeroplane

This engrossing reality series follows a group of teens who are experiencing Rumspringa, a period when Amish teenagers are allowed to explore life outside of...
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Billboard of U.S. troop embracing Muslim woman ...

Billboard of U.S. troop embracing Muslim woman ... | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Billboard of U.S. troop embracing Muslim woman stirs controversy http://t.co/TWPCBrdND5 (Billboard of U.S. troop embracing Muslim woman ...
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What an iPhone Feud Says About the Ancient Fight for Jerusalem - Jewish Daily Forward

What an iPhone Feud Says About the Ancient Fight for Jerusalem - Jewish Daily Forward | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Jewish Daily Forward
What an iPhone Feud Says About the Ancient Fight for Jerusalem
Jewish Daily Forward
Go to the clock app, and then into world clock, and scroll through all the cities that are available.
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Currywurst on the Street

Currywurst on the Street | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Michael Slackman, The Times's Berlin Bureau Chief, looks into the city's obsession with a popular street dish that combines sausage, ketchup and curry powder.

Via Seth Dixon
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Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 10:44 AM

This is a stride of different cultures,  a little ancient and modern culture. When the Turkish immigrant came over to Germany because they needed workers (Germans stopped having so many kids) it help form the curry wurst. They also use American ketchup because Americans were over there for the war and they ate this too. The curry powder came way of United Kingdom. Basically the population learned from all these cultures and  created one huge hit. 

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, October 26, 2014 11:23 AM

Unit 3

How are these 5 major elements of culture seen in this video?

1. Culture traits

2. Diffusion patters

3.Acculturation, assimilation, and multiculturalism

4. Culture region, vernacular region, cultural hearth

5. Globalization and the effects of technology on culture.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:26 PM

unit 3

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T-Shirt Travels

When filmmaker Shantha Bloemen was stationed in a remote village in Zambia as a worker with an international aid organization, she had to adjust to living in a different culture. But one thing struck her as oddly familiar: almost everyone in the village wore secondhand clothing from the West. Bloemen began to imagine stories about the people who used to wear the clothing, wondering if the original owners had any idea that the castoffs they had given to charities ended up being sold to Africans half a world away.


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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, July 19, 2013 9:48 AM

It's fascinating to look at the effects of globalization, and a great look at how economies change.  When people in the Western world drop a bag of clothes off at a charity, I doubt we think they'd end up in a village in Africa. Warning:  it does get a little preachy at the end. 

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:44 PM

Is direct aid a good thing or not? How does secondhand clothing impact local economies?

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:57 PM

Westernization is a popular theme thats happening in the East. Even though people don't know it, the clothes they give away may be some that are taken to places like Africa. Hand-me-downs are popular in the U.S. but even more so in Africa. The t-shirt you give away to someone might end up across the world. Who knows.

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The "Seinfeld of Saudi Arabia"

"[This video] explores the idea Western “cultural invasion” into Saudi Arabia, and satirizes Saudi views of America in the process. The influence of Western, particularly American, culture is a big, touchy topic in much of the world, with people torn between their love of Michael Jackson and their desire to patronize compatriots over foreigners. It’s about national pride and about preserving one’s own culture.  For English captions (click the little 'CC' button in the bottom-right corner after pressing play).

 

Skip to about 3:15 to see the segment on the Western 'cultural invasion' of Saudi Arabia and, appropriately, a very funny bit on attempting a 'reverse cultural invasion' of Saudi cultural in America."

--Max Fisher in the Washington Post


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Jess Pitrone's comment, April 29, 2013 9:42 PM
Throughout the world, American pop culture is what defines us, and it is definitely what we use to define ourselves, as well. When we look to other countries, we look to see what their popular culture is like and compare it to our own. I love this video because I think that it is poking fun at both American popular culture and Saudi culture. Where American pop culture is so large and all encompassing, Saudi pop culture is small and not nearly as significant in defining its people.
When we, as Americans, see Saudi Arabians, we see a repressed culture, but just because they don’t have the pop culture that we have, it doesn’t mean that they don’t have a distinct identity. Obviously the Saudis have a distinct identity, and obviously they aren’t afraid to poke fun at what Americans think of their culture.
Peter Siner's comment, April 30, 2013 9:29 AM
It seems as though throughout history there have always been tendencies for the Middle East to fall under a westernized mindset. Organizations and rulers throughout Middle Eastern history had challenged this idea. However, especially in todays society we are seeing a shift where the people of the middle east are becoming more and more accepting of westernized practices. The biggest hump however seems to be overcoming the religious boundaries that tie down the Middle East to its traditional ways. This process of westernization is not one that can be completed over night and it will most certainly be a very slow process that takes the time and effort of the people to make it happen. We are already seeing popular westernized culture integrate with the traditional culture of the middle east. With time, it is almost inevitable for the views of the western world to completely influence the people especially since the younger generations are so willing to change.
Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 19, 2015 10:15 AM

This is a fun video.  I like it because it exposes an Arab man for being just like any other American.  His comedy is good and it shows that Arabs are just like anyone of us.  Many times, lately, in America Arabs are pictured as being unforgiving, always serious, and ruthless people.  La Yekthar shows us the side of a Saudi comedian that we probably wouldn't see in mainstream American media.

 

I loved how the comedy was essentially a "roast" of his own culture, which shows that they are not much different than us.  The fact of the matter is that we have to be critical of our media.  Most people in the world are very similar to each other.  Yes, there are extremists and bad people in every ethnic group, but the bottom line is that they only make up a very small minority of a population.   I wish the media would focus as much on positive aspects of a foreign country as they do the negatives.

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Time Zones

Time Zones | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 27, 2013 2:07 PM

Coordinating a meeting across time zones can be confusion logistical task and one that people rarely can do off the top of their head or consulting some resources.  It is, however, fundamentally a geographic task.  Our friends at the Global Catastrophic Risk Institute put together this collection of 5 maps (and this time zone converter) to help global collaboration.

Louis Culotta's comment, February 27, 2013 3:16 PM
good info...I use a app on my phone most of the time for this info.