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The states people really want to move to — and those they don’t

The states people really want to move to — and those they don’t | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
A national trend has reversed.

 

When the U.S. economy slowed during the recession, so did one of the major demographic shifts of the last several decades. For a brief respite, the Northeast and Midwest stopped shedding quite so many residents to the burgeoning Sun Belt. That trend, though — which has big consequences for politics, among other things — has been picking back up.  New census data shows the trend accelerating back to its pre-recession pace.

 

Tags: migration, economic, USA.


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Rust Belt Rebirth Through Gentrification?

It’s become difficult to afford urban living in places like San Francisco, New York or even Portland, but there is an alternative. In Rust Belt cities like Pittsburgh, Buffalo and Cincinnati, you can buy or rent for about 1/10th the price.

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Nicholas Widaman's curator insight, September 7, 2015 9:54 PM

This clip talks about how people are "migrating" to more industrial based cities because the rent is so cheap.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 9:24 PM

I like this idea of gentrification, meaning you rebuild and renovate something that is old, dilapidated, and really not worth fixing up. Renovating places like this brings a whole new atmosphere to the area, it brings it to life, a life it once had that it lost. Renovating these areas is also probably good, because it raises the value of the area and higher value areas may just attract people to come see. Also, fixing up old restaurants, bars or other forms of entertainment might be enticing to people that are local and far away to check out what is new. Also, in general it will bring new economy to the area, renovating means construction jobs, finished construction jobs lead to new jobs because something can open in a newly renovated building and that new business will need employees. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 27, 5:39 PM
unit 7
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Urbanization in China

China's citizens are moving from the countryside into cities in record numbers, boosting the economy but making party leaders uneasy

 

Tags: economic, planning, urban, China, East Asia.


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François Arnal's curator insight, July 17, 2015 9:15 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

A big portion of China's economic boom the last few decades has been linked to the transformation of what used to be a predominantly agrarian civilization to an economic engine fueled by rapid urbanization.  This 2011 video from the Economist is still highly relevant today.   

 

@Céline

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, July 18, 2015 2:02 PM

Une courte vidéo de la revue The Economist

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 8:54 PM

A big portion of China's economic boom the last few decades has been linked to the transformation of what used to be a predominantly agrarian civilization to an economic engine fueled by rapid urbanization.  This 2011 video from the Economist is still highly relevant today.   

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City Centers Are Doing Better than Inner Suburbs

City Centers Are Doing Better than Inner Suburbs | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

A new report tracks demographic trends across 66 U.S. metro areas.  The report provides comprehensive evidence for Aaron Renn's "new donut" model of cities (pictured in above image, on the right). Renn's model proposes that city centers and outer-ring suburbs are doing well economically, but inner-ring suburbs are struggling with a new influx of poverty."

 

Tags: urban, economic, urban models, APHG.


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Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 27, 2015 4:09 AM

This shows the changes in urban geography and how the world is changing due to all the new technology available now.

Bella Reagan's curator insight, May 27, 2015 4:33 AM

Urban unit

Summary

This article goes in to depth on a newer model on cites called the donut model, as pictured similar to a donut. The donut model was created by Aaron Renn, and it shows urban development recently in cities. The center of the city is grownign economically and falling. There is an influx of people moving in , resulting in an increase of poverty too. Also more educated people are moving in like young newly educated individuals.

insight

The new structure of cities forming is a change from the old. With cities now developing bigger and more industrial, there are many opportunities for people for work in the center of the cit. however, many people may want the jobs but can't get them, so many of those in poverty live in the city centers in search of economic opportunities. It is also interesting to see the status of the people changing the in the city center with that also more young educated people move to city centers, most likely in search of job opportunities. This new way of urban development is modernizing the work system.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 1:44 PM

More and more the urban stage is filling and cities are becoming once again the next big thing. After WW2 suburbs became intensively popular but now since a change in personnel views people prefer the city more.

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Canada on mission to map Arctic, lay claim to broader boundaries

Canada on mission to map Arctic, lay claim to broader boundaries | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Canada has dispatched two icebreakers to map the Arctic seabed beneath the North Pole to support a bid to extend the country's maritime territory deeper into the waterways at the top of the world.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 19, 2014 12:19 AM

Option - marine environments and management

Kevin Barker's curator insight, August 19, 2014 1:53 PM

Canada and Russia have at least one way they will benefit from a warming climate and both are eager to see that they take advantage of it.  Using remote sensing is a way to identify and formalize where is their legitimate claim to territory and resources.  What problems might arise with the retreat of the arctic ice?

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 8:30 PM

APHG-Unit 4

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Dubai's Growth

Dubai's Growth | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

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steve smith's curator insight, March 31, 2014 9:03 AM

Great for tourism development

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 2014 3:48 PM

This series of pictures shows the extremely rapid growth of Dubai. An extremely wealthy city, the oil richness of Dubai has allowed for it to grow at an unprecedented rate from a desert to a sprawling metropolis. Such an impressive city springing up in a desolate desert speaks to how much resources can dictate where and how city growth occurs.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 14, 2014 10:13 PM

 Dubai has drastically changed throughtout it's time before the globalization boom and was one of the only cities to be impacted positively by globalization. As you can see from the depiction that Dubai in 1991 was a deserted place and then in 2005 it transformed into becoming somewhat of a city. In 2012 this city drastically transformed in order to help the globalization process and the whole city in general was trasformed into a mega city.

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A New Type of Growing City

A New Type of Growing City | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

“This is where the talent wants to live”


I believe there is a new class of city emerging across the country which are positioned to succeed in the coming decade – a class of city that has not yet been identified on a national scale. This city is a small/mid-sized regional center.


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Mary Rack's curator insight, October 26, 2013 3:11 PM

Interesting idea - I wonder if it will take hold. Worth watching - 

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Ship-Shipping Ships

Ship-Shipping Ships | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"This is a ship-shipping ship, shipping shipping ships."  http://geographyeducation.org/2013/10/14/ship-shipping-ships/

 


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jim dzialo's curator insight, October 16, 2013 7:54 PM

Pretty sure that doesn't fit in the panama canal

 

L.Long's curator insight, February 16, 2014 9:28 AM

The two industries that are the real backbone of globalization are transportation and communication.  What has accelerated the pace of global interconnectedness is the scale of these devices and their ubiquity in facilitating massive global commerce.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 1:20 PM

The two industries that are the real backbone of globalization are transportation and communication.  What has accelerated the pace of global interconnectedness is the scale of these devices and their ubiquity in facilitating massive global commerce. Economies of scale infuse our transportation and communicating technologies, boosting the diffusion of countless other technologies. China's transportation infrastructure, for example has undergone some amazing physical transformations that have made their economic growth possible.  If, however, you only want to laugh at the tongue-twister of ship-shipping ships shipping shipping ships,  this is the internet meme for you. 


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Can You Name These Cities by Their Starbucks Locations?

Can You Name These Cities by Their Starbucks Locations? | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"Can you recognize it by its Starbucks locations?  Let’s find out. This quiz shows all of the Starbucks locations within the city boundaries of 20 domestic or foreign cities, and for each you must name the city depicted from four choices."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 24, 2013 6:19 PM

This is my favorite place-based guessing game since GeoGuessr (5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" and you have to guess where).  This isn't about knowing Starbucks locations, but understanding spatial urban economic patterns (just as this article showing the locations where McDonald's and Burger King will place stores also relies of understanding urban economic patterns).  In this Starbucks game you have to recognized the shape of the city, major street patterns and the economic patterns just to name a few.  This is one way to make the urban model more relevant.       


Tags: urbanmodels, economic, trivia.

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 24, 2013 11:53 PM

Unfortuntaley I wasn't very good at this game. I believe I ended up getting 5 answers correct. However what was intersting about this article was to see how each starbucks was placed in certain areas. There were so much more starbucks locations in city areas. The starbucks' also typically were off of main highways or corners. This is for similiar reasons to what we dicussed about dunkin donuts in class. People are only going to travel so far for coffee. If it is not convienent then people will go else where. It is not like car dealership where people will drive out of their way to look. For a coffee people on average may drive 5 minutes. Anything too out of the way people will avoid. That is why there are so many starbucks and dunkins so close to eachother. They are set up equdistant from each other in locations that are convient for people around the area to try and get them to choose their coffee. It is typical to put a coffee shop on the main roads like we see in the maps, as well as in numerous locations to convience the whole area. The more convient the shop the more money they will make. That is why there are some many locations so close to each other. It is interesting to see it visually on a map just how many locations there actually are. 

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Australians push into China to reap the economic benefits - The Daily Telegraph

Australians push into China to reap the economic benefits - The Daily Telegraph | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Australians push into China to reap the economic benefits The Daily Telegraph These expatriate Australians have adapted to the very different culture of China, where city air can be almost unbreathable, where the ever-watchful government routinely...
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The No Good, Very Bad Outlook for the Working-Class American Man

The No Good, Very Bad Outlook for the Working-Class American Man | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

The U.S. economy once worked like a finely meshed machine. That is not true anymore. The U.S. economy is still a powerful engine, but workers aren’t seeing the benefits, less-educated men are struggling, and the rich have disconnected from everyone else.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 16, 2012 8:39 PM

The problems with the economy are not universally spread throughout society.  Certain segments are impacted more than others by the current struggles, especially when with look at axes of identity, such as class, gender and ethnicity.  While planning on a blue-collar job in the 1950s could have been a solid career plan for a young man in the United States, not so in the 21st century.     


Tags: labor, gender, class, industry, education.

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How the languages we speak affects the way we think

What can economists learn from linguists?

Tags: language, culture, economic, TED.


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Anne-Lous van den Ende's curator insight, May 7, 2013 4:18 PM

Intersting video on how the different languages we speak could affect our way of thinking.

Jack Born's curator insight, November 7, 2013 12:39 AM

I have never thought of this. I didn't even realise how different languages and cultures can be and how the tiny things effect the entire language.This demostrates why some languages are beter than others in their own way. 

Ms. Brin's curator insight, August 28, 2014 7:12 AM

Very interesting!

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Women and Land Infographic

Women and Land Infographic | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Landesa partners with governments and local NGOs to ensure the world's poorest families have secure land rights, which develops sustainable economic growth and improves education, nutrition, and conservation...

 

Globally speaking, women are the primary agricultural workers yet rarely own land. 


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Michael Crumpton's comment, March 21, 2013 12:38 AM
I'm not quite sure i understand why the woman aren't allowed time saving technalogy if it is they who till the fields. Why is that?
dilaycock's comment, March 21, 2013 5:30 AM
I think the answer lies in the patriarchal nature of many societies in the developing world. Women provide the labour, but are not in a position to make decisions about management of the land. This situation is exacerbated by gender inequities regarding access to education.
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 9, 2014 10:27 PM

New portion of the AP HUG Outline regarding Women in Agriculture

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The Ganges River Is Dying Under the Weight of Modern India

The Ganges River Is Dying Under the Weight of Modern India | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
The country’s future depends on keeping the holy river alive.

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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:00 AM

The Ganges River is a place of religion for these people, they see it as a place where they can bathe for the forgiveness of sins and for ancestors alike. The only problem with this really is that it is a very dirty river, sewage and other sorts of waste, germs and disease are running through it. Unfortunately, the people are drinking from this river.  

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 5:21 AM

The Ganges River is the most populated region in all of India. The river is sacred and is very holy to the people of India. The river is a religious river in which the people residing in the area use it as a symbolization or purification, life, bathing and drinking. The bigger issue for 'purification' is the fact that the river is very polluted and unsanitary. The pollution not only threatens the people because it could be used for drinking but it also affects the thousands of species, for example fish, that are in the river. The fish could be a source of food for the very overpopulated area but instead the very own people of India are damaging the river. One would think that a river so sacred would be protected and cleaned but it fails to meet these standards. Overall, regardless of the pollution, India still uses it for its religious beliefs and still declare it a holy river. 

Sarah Holloway's curator insight, February 16, 11:26 PM

This article touches on very serious religious and environmental issues connected to the Ganges River.  The Ganges is the sacred river of Hinduism and in part because the river valley is the most heavily populated region of India.  Simultaneously, this holy river is an incredibly polluted river as it's the watershed for a industrial region that struggles with significant sanitation problems; this is a great article on the environmental and cultural issues of development.

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Urbanization in China

China's citizens are moving from the countryside into cities in record numbers, boosting the economy but making party leaders uneasy

 

Tags: economic, planning, urban, China, East Asia.


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François Arnal's curator insight, July 17, 2015 9:15 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

A big portion of China's economic boom the last few decades has been linked to the transformation of what used to be a predominantly agrarian civilization to an economic engine fueled by rapid urbanization.  This 2011 video from the Economist is still highly relevant today.   

 

@Céline

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, July 18, 2015 2:02 PM

Une courte vidéo de la revue The Economist

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 8:54 PM

A big portion of China's economic boom the last few decades has been linked to the transformation of what used to be a predominantly agrarian civilization to an economic engine fueled by rapid urbanization.  This 2011 video from the Economist is still highly relevant today.   

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Political Symbolism in the Religious Landscape

This is a great juxtaposition of communal identities. Before becoming a part of Canada, this was the Cathedral of St. James. As a part of the British Empire, places such as Victoria Square became a part of the Montreal landscape. In what appears to me as a symbolic strike back against the British Monarchy's supremacy, this Cathedral is renamed Marie-Reine-du-Monde (Mary, Queen of the World). The fact that the Hotel Queen Elizabeth is looming overhead only heightens the tensions regarding whose queen reigns supreme; this isn't the real issue. The dueling queens served as a proxy for tensions between British political control and French cultural identity in Quebec several generations ago.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 12, 2015 9:43 PM

I was recently in Montreal; my last few Instagram posts aren't the prettiest pictures of my time in Canada.  I tried to select images that represented geographic concepts and would be the things I'd mention if we were on a walking tour of the city. 


TagsCanadasocial media, urban, economic, images, placeculture, landscape, tourism

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38 maps that explain the global economy

38 maps that explain the global economy | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Commerce knits the modern world together in a way that nothing else quite does. Almost anything you own these days is the result of a complicated web of global interactions. And there's no better way to depict those interactions than some maps.

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Mr. Lavold's curator insight, September 29, 2014 12:05 AM

Many ideological issues  relate to economics - and many economic issues related to geography. Take a look at these maps and see if they help you understand the global economy and where Canada fits in. Consider how different ideologies might view these maps and the data that they contain.

Maghfir Rafsan Jamal's curator insight, September 29, 2014 3:45 AM

I find a treasure.. :D

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 2, 2014 4:14 AM

Unit 6

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Love 'em or hate 'em - Britain's rocky relationship with the EU

Love 'em or hate 'em - Britain's rocky relationship with the EU | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"The United Kingdom's relationship with the EU - or, in political parlance, 'Europe' - has long been one of the most divisive, emotive issues in British politics."


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Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 19, 2015 7:41 PM

This article shows that the United Kingdom is far different than its mainland European counterparts.  Many Europeans (especially the French) often criticize the UK, but this can be contributed to the long standing historical "misunderstandings" between the two countries.  Another fact that the article hits on, that makes Great Britain so much different than the rest of Europe, is the large overseas empire the nation controlled at one point in its history.  The UK is used to being on its own against continental European powers (Napoleon's France, Hitler's Germany, and the Spanish Armada to name a few).  Because of the UK's culture as well as its geographic location, the country has come to be vastly different than a majority of Europe and because of this resists becoming a full member of the European Union.  The country feels it is safer on its own than joining the Eurozone economic system.  Because of its history and location, the UK is in many ways closer to the United States than many countries in Europe.  It seems like until the "EU question" is resolved for good in Great Britain it is not going away any time soon.

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 5, 2015 8:11 PM

If there is a more obvious example of geography shaping national politics, I have yet to come across it. The UK has long regarded "the continentals" as an alien race, filled with backwards and strange practices considered unseemly to the British people. This is very much a result of the UK being an island nation; cultural and political diffusion have always taken longer to take hold there as a result of its separation from the rest of Europe; British culture is uniquely "British," in even more of a sense than the cultures of the rest of Europe. English is as unrelated to any other European language as possible. Separated from the rest of the continent, it has always remained relatively aloof from the cultural and political pressures of the rest of the continent, which was only sharped during the Second World War. The British look across to the Atlantic in times of trouble, towards the United States, rather than across the channel to its fellow European nations. Intense pride in its long history of global dominance allows for many British citizens to view themselves as being "above" the political and economic cooperation now being sought in the European Union, reflected in British insistence on maintaining a separate currency. Resistance to forging closer ties to the continent has always been a feature in British politics, but the reality of globalization makes this isolationist sentiment obsolete and backwards. Refusing to move forward with its neighbors, the UK is in danger of falling further behind.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 9:19 PM

that the British have issues with mainland European countries. England [at least] has fought wars against most of them. that some tension would remain after a peace that has lasted one twentieth of the time that whoever lives in Britain has been fighting the people who live on  the continent.

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Maldives

Maldives | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

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Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 15, 2015 1:54 AM

The creation of the Maldives was a evolutionary process that was created with hotspots in the Pacific Ocean. However most of the 1200 or so islands are disappearing. As many of these islands have been created and built upon, the soils are losing their strength. Now we have a process of erosion not only from rain but also from the sea waves. As this eats away at the islands they are getting smaller and smaller and unless they start bringing in artificial land area they will someday disappear.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 15, 2015 3:39 AM

The Maldives Islands were created by Hotspots in the Pacific Ocean. Many of the one thousand islands that are there are slowly disappearing. The islands are being destroyed by rain and from sea waves that crash onto the island itself. Soon the land, just like Kiribati will disappear because they just keep shrinking in size more and more. Their economy revolves mostly around tourist money and parts of the islands have been highly developed for high end tourist marketing.  

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 19, 2015 9:33 AM

Honestly a nation like the Maldives would only be possible with today's technology. the lack of resources, land and linking landmass would have made it stuck in an era with villages at best. The modern country if you ask me is also a disaster waiting to happen. Their cities are right on sea level. A single tsunami or storm would devastate them never mind rising sea levels. I just think they are acting unsustainable and their growth without lack of native resources will lead to their nations ultimate failure. While I wish these people success their islands are also eroding due to reefs so geography is pretty much against them at every turn. In the future hopefully a solution to these problems can be found but until then this will likely be an area that will have to be evacuated in the future like many others.

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Detroit on the edge

Detroit on the edge | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Bob Simon reports on the decline of America's former industrial capital and the people determined to bring it back

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 17, 2013 1:32 AM

Detroit is the largest city to declare bankruptcy and more importantly the first major American city to essentially fail as a major metropolitan area.  Sections of the city are reminiscent of a post-apocalyptic bestselling novel:  80,000 buildings stand empty, 40% of the streetlights don’t work, and it routinely takes police one hour to respond to a 911 call.


Tags: urban, economic, industry, Detroit

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, November 19, 2013 5:21 PM

The Detroit "Renaissance"  is an interesting one to say the least. There is an obvious opportunity to lay the foundations for something new and bold after clearing the rubble that has become detroit. But who is going to be displaced once the rubble's cleared and the trendy cafes, art studios, and co-ops are erected? Who amongst the poor and already displaced will be held up high, encouraged, and supported to help create this new Detroit? Cutting costs from health care and pensions, from those who already live in this city and are struggling, doesn't sound particularly productive. Especially after referencing having posession of extremely valuable art pieces that could be sold off. This article really sheds a light on the pro's and con's that are associated in capital investment in a bankrupt and wartorn American city.

I don't think that the poor and hungry care about paint on a canvas. They need access to opportunity and the resources to seize it.

 

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Political and Economic Geography Presentations

Political and Economic Geography Presentations | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

6 conference presentations on various economic and political geography topics given at NCGE 2013 as a part of the APHG strand.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 3, 2013 7:27 PM

The last two mornings in Denver, CO there was a series of presentations of economic and political geography given in front of a capacity crowd.  6 of the educators have agreed to share the slides of their presentations with the broader geography education community and you can access them all here.  See also this livebinder with resources for teaching APHG to 9th graders (which can be adapted to older students as well).  This was a fantastic professional development event and we are all thankful that they were willing to share these resources.  


Tags: APHG, NCGE, political, economic.

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 2:42 PM

These conference presentations show the importance that geography plays in the roles of both politics and economics. The impact that geography has on economics is a huge one. You could argue that geography is used as a scale in some instances in economics because of the land structure and locating were certain areas are.If you are able to locate certain things or find out where you want to put certain things in a place geography allows you to do so using economics.

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T-Shirt Travels

When filmmaker Shantha Bloemen was stationed in a remote village in Zambia as a worker with an international aid organization, she had to adjust to living in a different culture. But one thing struck her as oddly familiar: almost everyone in the village wore secondhand clothing from the West. Bloemen began to imagine stories about the people who used to wear the clothing, wondering if the original owners had any idea that the castoffs they had given to charities ended up being sold to Africans half a world away.


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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, July 19, 2013 2:48 PM

It's fascinating to look at the effects of globalization, and a great look at how economies change.  When people in the Western world drop a bag of clothes off at a charity, I doubt we think they'd end up in a village in Africa. Warning:  it does get a little preachy at the end. 

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 5:44 PM

Is direct aid a good thing or not? How does secondhand clothing impact local economies?

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:57 PM

Westernization is a popular theme thats happening in the East. Even though people don't know it, the clothes they give away may be some that are taken to places like Africa. Hand-me-downs are popular in the U.S. but even more so in Africa. The t-shirt you give away to someone might end up across the world. Who knows.

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Has China's economy hit a dead end?

Has China's economy hit a dead end? | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
China's disappointing economic growth in the first quarter is leading to a loss of confidence in the outlook for the world's second largest economy.
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Subject of Envy: Britain Discovers Germany as a...

Subject of Envy: Britain Discovers Germany as a... | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Britain, which has yet to recover from the 2008 financial crash, is peering enviously at Germany's economic structure with its focus on engineering, its medium-sized firms, apprenticeships, regional banks and long-term business approach.
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Hans Rosling: 5 talks on global issues | TED Playlists | TED

Hans Rosling: 5 talks on global issues | TED Playlists | TED | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Data visionary Hans Rosling's favorite talks keep an eye toward health, economics and population growth -- from business in Africa to youth culture in China.
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