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Portraits of Reconciliation

Portraits of Reconciliation | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
20 years after the genocide in Rwanda, these perpetrators and survivors are standing for forgiveness.

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diana buja's curator insight, April 7, 11:23 PM

Yesterday was a national holiday here in Burundi, commemorating the shooting down of the plane containing the presidents of Burundi and Rwanda, and the beginning of the awful genocide in Rwanda.  I was in Nairobi at the time, and have graphic visions of what took place, which I will blog about this week.

Paige Therien's curator insight, April 11, 10:14 AM

These pictures and the stories behind them are very emotional.  The Rwandan Genocide was made possible by powerful propaganda which further pushed Hutu and Tutsi interests and perceptions of one another to opposite extremes.  As they are all Rwandans who live amongst each other, the genocide spread like wildfire from within and turned the country on its head.  I think the fact that victim/forgivers and perpetrators can stand side by side and be civil is very important. It shows the persistence of humanity to work together in reciprocal relationships and the importance of a "clear conscience" when doing so.  This project of reconciliation fosters support for those who lost so much, as well as unity through communication.  When these people are compared with the United States, I think it is very telling of the United State's moral and ethical character; the lack of political and economic interests in Rwanda was their reasoning behind our country not getting involved.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 12:35 PM

Rwanda is a genocide that many people don't even know about. Regardless of whether someones heard of it, they should still be aware of how people have lived their lives from that time. Some looking to forgive the people who did this, and others looking to gain forgiveness from those they hurt.

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Issues with Ukrainian Nationalism

Issues with Ukrainian Nationalism | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"Images of toppled statues notwithstanding, 'revolution' has never been the right word to describe recent events in Kiev. Ukraine, after all, has been here before. At the heart of the country’s present struggle is its resistance to any 'strategic partnership' with Russia and its understanding of Europe as a potential economic and political savior from corrupt government. But the tensions between East and West -- both psychological and geographic -- are deeply rooted in Ukraine's national identity. Those Ukrainians most concerned about their country’s future would do well to recognize that identity’s inherent fragility. The original generation of Ukrainian nationalists suffered precisely for their failure to do so."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 19, 1:30 PM

This image (hi-res here) and those like it captured me while I was looking for more information on Ukraine's opposition leaders


Tag: Ukraine, political, conflict, devolution.

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 8:43 AM

The situation in Ukraine with the tensions between the East and West are something that could possibly cause WWIII, and that is something that fears a lot of people. The former power of the Soviet Union and corrupt government is embedded in Ukraine's national identity with many different ethnic groups speaking different languages.

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9 questions about Ukraine you were too embarrassed to ask

9 questions about Ukraine you were too embarrassed to ask | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

Watch a video that explains Ukraine's crisis in two minutes or read this quick article that covers the same material.  

 

Ukrainians have been protesting since Nov. 21, when President Viktor Yanukovych rejected a deal for closer integration with the European Union, instead drawing the country closer to Russia. They are still in the streets in huge numbers and have seized regional government buildings in several parts of the country. In Kiev, the capital, clashes between protesters and security forces have become violent, killing several people. On Tuesday, the prime minister resigned. No one is quite sure what will happen next.

 


Via Seth Dixon
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Cam E's curator insight, February 18, 8:55 AM

Ukraine is one of those countries on a fault line between two major regional powers, with it splitting the country almost neatly in half. Could Ukraine become a split country akin to Germany during the Cold War? The clean cut Russian influenced East and the pro-European west seem almost too divided to reach an agreement

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 10:08 AM

This two minute video perfectly explains where there is such a crisis in Ukraine. The country is literally divided. The people in areas closest to Russia speak Russian, and the farther west the less people are speaking Russian. It makes sense why the people who are Pro-Russian speak Russian and were most likely displaced during the years of the USSR and Soviet Russia.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 30, 5:44 PM

This article is somewhat humorous. It nails asking and answering questions that people are "to afraid" to ask. Ukraine has had its ups and downs and the division of land has been a huge problem for it. Ukraine is going to have to work harder to get the exact European ties that it wants to have. Protests are being a serious issue in Kiev and Ukraine needs to get a grip on whats happening to its country.

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Interactives: War and Refugees

Interactives: War and Refugees | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

UNHCR has been attempting to count the world's refugees since it was created. If you want to find out which years resulted in the worst displacement, which were the biggest countries of origin and which were the biggest countries of asylum, use the interactive map.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 27, 2013 7:02 AM

This interactive on refugees is especially timely, given that the Syrian civil war has created refugee situations in many of the neighboring countries.  One of my favorite elements of the Guardian's interactive is that they provide the raw data, so students can create their own maps with the same high quality data.  Equally important, this interactive shows the regional power bases of all the various factions of the Syrian rebellion that is seeking to overthrow the Assad regime.  The political conflict has huge demographic implications.    

Tags: refugees, Syria, migration, conflict, political, MiddleEast, war.

Emilie Kochert's curator insight, September 8, 2013 1:25 AM

via gduboz

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Syrian refugees update 2013

Syrian refugees update 2013 | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"Another refugee camp opened today in Mrajeeb al-Fhood, Jordan, to accommodate the reported 1,500 to 2,000 Syrians fleeing to Jordan daily.  Just over a year ago the Big Picture posted an entry of the growing number of people displaced due to the conflict that now has lasted over two years. The United Nations recently said a total of around 7,000 to 8,000 Syrians are leaving their country daily; there are 1.3 million Syrian refugees and almost 4 million more have been displaced inside Syria since the start of the conflict. Posted here is another glimpse of daily life for those displaced since the beginning of this year." 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 13, 2013 1:06 PM

These 37 images are excellent, but I chose to share this particular one, because the combination of poverty and happiness embody the purpose behind refugee camps.  While the living conditions are grim and far from ideal, they are better than the alternative for these refugees and the assistance that they are receiving from the international community can be a ray of hope for the future of these children.  In this picture, Syrian refugee children play in Sidon, located in southern Lebanon. 


Tags: Syria, migration, conflict, political, MiddleEast, war.

MAANDO_PROTOTYPE's curator insight, March 13, 3:19 PM

http://syria-freedom-2014.tumblr.com/
FREEDOM GRAFFiTi WEEK Syria ... MAANDO...PROTOTYPE
#Syria #MAANDO #PROTOTYPE #SYRIAN

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 26, 12:13 PM

Conflicts in Syria have led almost 4 million refugees to displace to Jordan. Refugee camps have been set up to aid these families the best ways possible. although conditions are still tough, they are much safer than in Syria. These photos embrace the combinations of struggle and joy. Children cry and children play. Families create homes within the tents and make due with what they have.

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A very good sign that North Korea is bluffing about war

A very good sign that North Korea is bluffing about war | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

If Pyongyang is as bent on war as it wants us to believe, why is it keeping the inter-Korean Kaesong industrial complex open?

 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 29, 2013 8:02 AM


News reports coming out of North Korea are grim and threatening right now.  However, this Washington Post article argues that it might be all for show.  The Kaesong Industrial Complex was opened in 2002 as a gesture of peace.  Located just across the northern side of the border, it is staffed by South and North Koreans (South Korea get super cheap labor, North Korea gets an infusion of currency, both get positive PR). The Kaesong Industrial Complex continues to operate with the permission of the North Korean government.  Were that to ever change and North Korea shut down this joint venture, THEN we'll know that they are serious.  Watch this short video for an overview of the geopolitical situation on the Korean peninsula as of March 2013. 


TagsNorth Korea, war, labor, industry, economicconflict, unit 6 industry.

Trisha Klancar's curator insight, March 30, 2013 6:25 AM

Very interesting insight.

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The countries most at risk for a coup in 2013

The countries most at risk for a coup in 2013 | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"The map [above] sorts the countries of the world into three groups based on their relative coup risk for 2013: highest (red), moderate (orange), and lowest (beige)."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 25, 2013 7:11 AM

While this is not predicting a coup in any of these places, this map is a visualization of data that was used to assess the factors that would make a coup likely (to see an alternate map, here is the Washington Post's review of the same data that mapped the 30 countries most likely to have a coup). 


Questions to Ponder: What factors do you think would be important in compilling data of this nature?  What makes a country susceptible to this type of governmental overthrow?  What creates governmental stability? 


Tags: political, conflict, unit 4 political, governance, Africa.

wereldvak's curator insight, January 26, 2013 2:28 AM

Factoren die meespelen zijn hieronder genoemd.

 

The algorithm for successful coups uses just four risk factors, one of which is really just an adjustment to the intercept.

Infant mortality rate (relative to annual global median, logged): higher risk in countries with higher rates.Degree of democracy (Polity score, quadratic): higher risk for countries in the mid-range of the 21-point scale.Recent coup activity (yes or no): higher risk if any activity in the past five years.Post-Cold War period: lower risk since 1989.

The algorithm for any coup attempts, successful or failed, uses the following ten risk factors, including all four of the ones used to forecast successful coups.

Infant mortality rate (relative to annual global median, logged): higher risk in countries with higher rates.Recent coup activity (count of past five years with any, plus one and logged): higher risk with more activity.Post-Cold War period: lower risk since 1989.Popular uprisings in region (count of countries with any, plus one and logged): higher risk with more of them.Insurgencies in region (count of countries with any, plus one and logged): higher risk with more of them.Economic growth (year-to-year change in GDP per capita): higher risk with slower growth.Regime durability (time since last abrupt change in Polity score, plus one and logged): lower risk with longer time.Ongoing insurgency (yes or no): higher risk if yes.Ongoing civil resistance campaign (yes or no): higher risk if yes.Signatory to 1st Optional Protocol of the UN’s International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (yes or no): lower risk if yes.

from:http://dartthrowingchimp.wordpress.com/2012/01/30/assessing-coup-risk-in-2012/ ;
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An Interactive Map of the Blitz: Where and When the Bombs Fell on London

An Interactive Map of the Blitz: Where and When the Bombs Fell on London | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
The extent of the campaign is shocking.

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Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 12:30 AM

It was called the Blitz for a reason. For months, nobody in London was safe.  As seen on the map, nearly every inch of London was affected by Nazi bombs. Not only were there bombs falling, but also planes and other war machines involved.  The modern version of London is surely a rebuilt version of its 1940's counterpart.

Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 2:46 PM

This is one of my favorite maps that I have seen. How devastating it must have been to live in London at the time, never knowing where the next one would land to destroy the city.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 4:50 AM

This map shows the locations for the nearly 2000 bombs which were dropped on London during the Blitz in WWII. The bombs were dropped entirely inside the ring of M25 London Orbital Motorway which encircles London. The bombs are most concentrated in the center of the ring, likely to do the most damage, to either infrastructure or the people.

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UN High Commissioner for Refugees

UN High Commissioner for Refugees | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
The key facts and figures about refugees, IDPs, asylum seekers and stateless people from UNHCR's annual Global Trends report.

 

Not all migation is voluntary.  Refugees and other non-voluntary migrants often are in their situation due to complex geographic factors beyond their control at the national scale. 

 

Tags: migration, population, development, conflict, statistics, war, unit 2 population.


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Mr Ortloff's curator insight, January 21, 2013 9:20 PM

Good source for stats on non-voluntary migrants.

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The less Americans know about Ukraine’s location, the more they want U.S. to intervene

The less Americans know about Ukraine’s location, the more they want U.S. to intervene | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
84% of Americans are unable to locate Ukraine on a world map; those that can't are more likely to support military intervention.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 7, 9:10 AM

As I've said before, a more informed, geo-literate citizenry helps to strengthen U.S. foreign policy and diplomatic efforts because they have a spatial framework within which to organize political, environmental, cultural and economic information.  National Geographic recently also produced a video showing how geo-education is important for business professionals as a part of their geo-education community (if you haven't already, join!).

David R. Perry's curator insight, April 7, 8:38 PM

Beyond sad.

Rach Brick's curator insight, April 13, 7:45 PM

This says so much about ignorance and aggression... Do they even know that they'd have to come up with a catchy name because the Crimea has already got a war names after it?

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Security Still A Major Concern In Sochi

ESPN Video: Jeremy Schaap details the threats to the 2014 Winter Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia.

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 18, 11:14 AM

Security is a major concern in Sochi! There have been suicide bombers and many other forms of bomb threats. The athletes are under MAX security and in my opinion need to be because they are in danger because of the way their society is over there and the current issues they have been dealing or not dealing with.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 18, 11:57 AM

The Olympics being held in Sochi, Russia concern many across the globe. Located very close to neighboring terrorists, Olympic athletes question whether it is safe to go or not. ESPN discusses the concerns, threats and  increase of security at the games this year. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 30, 5:29 PM

The Olympic games only come around every four years. From a spectators point of view, these games are a worldwide phenomenon. Millions of people will be watching them from home and in attendance in Sochi. Threats against HUGE events like these need to be taken seriously. Whether or not they are realistic, with so many lives in potential danger Russia needs to take the threats seriously.

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A short, recent history of Congo

Mapping the war in Congo: mineral wealth, militias and an epic march

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 24, 7:10 PM

 This video tells me that having an abundance of natural and mineral resources may not always lead to a country that is successful and rich. If the country is politically or economically unstable it could lead to violence within the area over the valuable goods. Also, the wealth generated from these goods could potentially make only a few people very rich and many other workers who collect these resources poor from low wages. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 12:50 PM

Congo has had wars and the militia has ended up taking a stride towards benefiting the congo. Every history begins and ends with new beginnings. For Congo, their journeys have ended and new ones are starting.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 12:04 PM

A very comprehensive coverage of the past 20 years. I did not realize just how much Rwanda influenced the major problems in the Congo. Having the capital city of Kinshasa so geographically far away from its "trouble border" is probably making it more difficult to control.

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Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave?

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave? | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Africa may have achieved independence, but the old colonial ties are still important as France’s decision to send troops to Mali to fight Islamist extremists shows.

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 7:27 AM

This infographic was very interesting.  By using color coding it highlights the areas of influence the colonel powers still maintain over their old possessions.  This map is helpful in understanding how this affects the politics of theses regions today.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 9:59 AM

Colonial ties are still very prevalent due to Europe's dependence upon the resources of Africa. European countries like England and France invest billions in Africa, not to help those African nations, but to build infrastructure for resource extraction or to keep governments stable. Though the true exploitation of Africa has ended, the current situation certainly has the ring of exploitation as the people of Europe enjoy the diamonds and chocolate harvested by the multitudes of impoverished people of Africa.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 1:04 PM

Colony powers are still located within Africa. Just because Africa is technically independent doesn't mean that British Colonial power isn't still in place.

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The Golan Heights

The Golan Heights | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

In early November 2012, three Syrian tanks entered the demilitarized zone (DMZ) of the Golan Heights. The move by Syria is the first violation of the zone in 40 years and concerns countries of the region. Since then some of the Syrian rebels have also been reported operating in Golan Heights.


Via Seth Dixon
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Jamie Strickland's curator insight, April 3, 2013 6:10 AM

This map can be used to illustrate not only the political and cultural significance of the Golan Heights, but also its environmental significance as a source of water for the Jordan-Yarmuk River Valley

Louis Culotta's curator insight, April 4, 2013 3:35 PM

Heres some info on how poeple have been living in regards to a troubled area of the world.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 6:08 AM

This article stresses the importance of geography when discussing political situation with neighboring countries.  The fact that the heights are such a strategic advantage to whoever owns them explains why they are so contested.  As long as these two countries are not friendly nations this disagreement over the strategic point will continue.

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The countries most at risk for a coup in 2013

The countries most at risk for a coup in 2013 | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"The map [above] sorts the countries of the world into three groups based on their relative coup risk for 2013: highest (red), moderate (orange), and lowest (beige)."


Via Seth Dixon, Karen Moles Rose
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 25, 2013 7:11 AM

While this is not predicting a coup in any of these places, this map is a visualization of data that was used to assess the factors that would make a coup likely (to see an alternate map, here is the Washington Post's review of the same data that mapped the 30 countries most likely to have a coup). 


Questions to Ponder: What factors do you think would be important in compilling data of this nature?  What makes a country susceptible to this type of governmental overthrow?  What creates governmental stability? 


Tags: political, conflict, unit 4 political, governance, Africa.

wereldvak's curator insight, January 26, 2013 2:28 AM

Factoren die meespelen zijn hieronder genoemd.

 

The algorithm for successful coups uses just four risk factors, one of which is really just an adjustment to the intercept.

Infant mortality rate (relative to annual global median, logged): higher risk in countries with higher rates.Degree of democracy (Polity score, quadratic): higher risk for countries in the mid-range of the 21-point scale.Recent coup activity (yes or no): higher risk if any activity in the past five years.Post-Cold War period: lower risk since 1989.

The algorithm for any coup attempts, successful or failed, uses the following ten risk factors, including all four of the ones used to forecast successful coups.

Infant mortality rate (relative to annual global median, logged): higher risk in countries with higher rates.Recent coup activity (count of past five years with any, plus one and logged): higher risk with more activity.Post-Cold War period: lower risk since 1989.Popular uprisings in region (count of countries with any, plus one and logged): higher risk with more of them.Insurgencies in region (count of countries with any, plus one and logged): higher risk with more of them.Economic growth (year-to-year change in GDP per capita): higher risk with slower growth.Regime durability (time since last abrupt change in Polity score, plus one and logged): lower risk with longer time.Ongoing insurgency (yes or no): higher risk if yes.Ongoing civil resistance campaign (yes or no): higher risk if yes.Signatory to 1st Optional Protocol of the UN’s International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (yes or no): lower risk if yes.

from:http://dartthrowingchimp.wordpress.com/2012/01/30/assessing-coup-risk-in-2012/ ;
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As Kurds Fight for Freedom in Syria, Fears Rise in Turkey

As Kurds Fight for Freedom in Syria, Fears Rise in Turkey of Following Suit

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Joshua Choiniere's comment, December 18, 2012 8:23 AM
This is really interesting professor
Eliana Oliveira Burian's curator insight, December 28, 2012 3:34 AM

How to handle it?

 

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, January 8, 2013 10:15 AM

Since the fall of the Ottoman Empire, the Kurds have been caught in other people's plans for what the states of the Middle East should look like and are the largest 'stateless nation' in the world.  Divided between Iraq, Iran, Syria and Turkey, the Kurds have not been able to politically mobilize support for Kurdistan as they have been violently oppressed in these countries.  The Kurds in Iraq have been able to gain political autonomy with the fall of Saddam Hussein's regime, and the Syrian Kurds are hoping to do the same if and when the Assad regime crumbles at the end of the civil war.  This make Turkey concerned that the Kurds in the southeastern part of Turkey will make renewed efforts to push for sovereignty. 


UPDATE: This PBS feature explains the historic timeline of the important political events for the Kurds in Iraq.This article from the Economist focuses on the key reason that outside forces won't leave the Kurds alone: oil.

 

Tags: Syria, ethnic, conflict, political, Turkey, culture, devolution.

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A Life Revealed

A Life Revealed | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Seventeen years after she stared out from the cover of National Geographic, a former Afghan refugee comes face-to-face with the world once more.

 

The original cover is one of the more famous National Geographic photos of all time, and yet the woman in the photograph has not lived a life as though millions of people could recognize her eyes.  This is her story. 


Via Seth Dixon
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megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 10:08 PM
But by looking at the photo we can see the beauty out of all the pain.
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, December 15, 2013 10:49 PM

This photo is in Rome, where there is an exhibit based on NGS photos, and in Las Vegas as well. In both places the lines were long to get in.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 7:00 AM

This is basically a publicity stunt. When someone puts a specific cover on a magazine, they are looking for a certain kind of attention. Yes, this woman has faced some hardships in her life but not the brutal and intense things that this magazine may have stirred up.