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Resilient floating school provides reliable education in flood-prone African village

Resilient floating school provides reliable education in flood-prone African village | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

Built with recycled and local materials, this floating school is a prototype that could be built in other flood-prone areas.

Designed by NLÉ, a firm founded by Nigerian-born architect Kunlé Adeyemi, the Makoko Floating School is a prototype that could be applied to other areas in Africa that face infrastructural and social challenges due to climate change.

More at the link.

 

 


Via Lauren Moss
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Christian Allié's curator insight, April 4, 8:07 AM

........"""""""""""""""""........

 

..  [Makoko Floating School] is a movable 'building' or 'watercraft' currently located in the aquatic community of Makoko in the lagoon heart of Africa's second most populous city - Lagos, Nigeria. It is a floating structure that adapts to the tidal changes and varying water levels, making it invulnerable to flooding and storm surges. It is designed to use renewable energy, to recycle organic waste and to harvest rainwater.

[ ... ]

....... 

The designers envision whole communities built in this clever fashion, which can float with on the rising waters of a natural disaster. Check out our other post on flood-resistant, floating bamboo homes, and see more over at Dezeen and NLÉ.

CORRECTION: The floating platform is made of "16 wooden modules, each containing 16 [recycled empty plastic barrels]." We apologize for the error.

Related on TreeHugger.com:Affordable bamboo house that floats when it floods, revisitedThis geodesic houseboat cost less than $2,000 to buildAutark Home: A Self-Sufficient, Floating Passivhaus Houseboat
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New York's Changing Skyline

New York's Changing Skyline | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 26, 2013 12:55 PM

I love this visualization of New York City's evolving skyline from 1876-2013.  The urban landscape of America's prominent cities has changed dramatically. 


Tags: historical,urbanarchitecture, landscape, NYC.

Louis Culotta's comment, May 1, 2013 8:32 AM
I wonder if the tallest building in the first picture is the first stage of the Brooklyn Bridge??????
Louis Culotta's curator insight, May 1, 2013 8:35 AM

if you look at the first picture...it looks like the tall building on the water could be the first stage of the Brooklyn Bridge...any suggestions to this?

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Ultra-Dense Housing

Ultra-Dense Housing | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated areas in the world. Seven million people living in 423 square miles (1,096 sq km).

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 2:55 PM

With Hong Kong being one of the most densely populated areas in the world, it is no surprise that living quarters are tight with not much space to move. In the photos shown, apartments were so small that they could only be photographed from the ceiling. There is no place to relax and residents are lucky to have whatever they can fit besides their beds. Families with children have to have bunk-beds in order to accommodate. 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2:57 PM

Wow, I cannot imagine living in these conditions. It looks smaller than a prison cell; only people pay to live there. These extreme living conditions are a result of over population in an area. It seems the city of Hong Kong is running out of places to build and house the abundance of people living there. It appears the average person in Hong Kong lives in these conditions due to the high price tags on larger apartments. This is a sad reality.   

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 8:06 AM

Living in such close quarters must be incredibly hard to do for those people who are new to Hong Kong and know something different. For Chinese residents, this is normal. Living in such small areas is a part of the Chinese daily life and culture. China is so population dense that this is the result of living there, tiny living spaces.

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Rainforest Guardian: A Lotus-Shaped Concept Skyscraper

Rainforest Guardian: A Lotus-Shaped Concept Skyscraper | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

When you add one part skyscraper, one part forest-saving reservoir, and one part eco-laboratory, you get the all-parts-awesome behemoth known as the Rainforest Guardian, a conceptual design that looks like a giant metal lotus flower sticking out of the expansive Amazon rainforest.

Designed by Jie Huang, Jin Wei, Qiaowan Tang, Yiwei Yu, and Zhe Hao from China, the architectural beast is not like your average skyscraper. In contrast to the normally spearhead-like structure of your typical cloud-kissing building, the top of the Guardian has the most surface area. This allows it to catch and store hundreds of gallons of rainwater to save for the dry season. It also gives the building an organic, futuristic aesthetic that seems more at home in a galaxy far, far away than on our own world. Not to mention, the building is driping with dozens of long, wet vines—making it some fusion of nature and artificial design. No wonder it was an honorable mention at this year's eVolvo Skyscraper Competition...


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Mark Warren's curator insight, April 2, 11:50 PM

Rainforest Guardian: A Lotus-Shaped Concept Skyscraper

Jimmy Johnston MBE's curator insight, April 3, 1:49 PM

WOW!!!

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Ultra-Dense Housing

Ultra-Dense Housing | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated areas in the world. Seven million people living in 423 square miles (1,096 sq km).

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 2:55 PM

With Hong Kong being one of the most densely populated areas in the world, it is no surprise that living quarters are tight with not much space to move. In the photos shown, apartments were so small that they could only be photographed from the ceiling. There is no place to relax and residents are lucky to have whatever they can fit besides their beds. Families with children have to have bunk-beds in order to accommodate. 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2:57 PM

Wow, I cannot imagine living in these conditions. It looks smaller than a prison cell; only people pay to live there. These extreme living conditions are a result of over population in an area. It seems the city of Hong Kong is running out of places to build and house the abundance of people living there. It appears the average person in Hong Kong lives in these conditions due to the high price tags on larger apartments. This is a sad reality.   

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 8:06 AM

Living in such close quarters must be incredibly hard to do for those people who are new to Hong Kong and know something different. For Chinese residents, this is normal. Living in such small areas is a part of the Chinese daily life and culture. China is so population dense that this is the result of living there, tiny living spaces.

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The New Architecture of Smart Cities

The New Architecture of Smart Cities | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
What makes a city a “Smart City” as opposed to a city where some “smart things” happen?


Three criteria for answering that question clearly stand out:


Smart Cities are led from the top – they have a strong and visionary leader championing the Smart agenda across the city. Smart Cities have a stakeholder forum – they have drawn together a community of city stakeholders across the city. Those stakeholders have not only created a compelling vision for a Smart City; they have committed to taking an ongoing role coordinating a program to deliver it. Smart Cities invest in technology infrastructure – they are deploying the required information and communication technology (ICT) platforms across the city, and doing so in such a way as to support the integration of information and activity across city systems.

 

It’s also important, though, to consider what is different about the structure and organization of city systems in a Smart City. How does a city decide which technology infrastructures are required? Which organizations will make use of them, and how? How can they be designed and delivered so that they effectively serve individuals, communities and businesses in the city? What other structures and processes are required to achieve this progress in a Smart City?

 

Read on to learn about the design of the infrastructures and systems of Smart Cities and view  them visually represented in an accompanying diagram.


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