AP Human GeographyNRHS
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Cityscapes of Chicago

Cityscape Chicago II is a personal timelapse piece that I have worked on periodically over the past two years. The inspiration behind the project ties similarly with the original piece. As the city of Chicago continues to change, my fascination with it grows as well. The goal for me is always to capture the city in a unique way from new perspectives, and to continue exploring it.

 

Tags: Chicago, urban, place, landscape,  video.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 12, 2014 8:08 AM

A little closer to my home and workplace, here is a similar video about Providence, Rhode Island.

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Not All English is the Same

Not All English is the Same | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"22 Maps That Show How Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other"


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Lena Minassian's curator insight, January 27, 2015 5:58 PM

This article was actually funny and interesting. You do not really pay attention to the pronunciation of words just because we are surrounded by the same people who say a particular word the same way. Many individuals in the US are in for a culture shock if they leave their respected homes. One word that you have grown up with may be a completely different word in another area. We tend to not focus a lot of attention on the smaller details like this type of grammar and pronunciation so this caught my eye because it was interesting to think about and realize how you say words compared to the rest of the United States.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, January 28, 2015 11:53 AM

to me this is not so shocking but definitely entertaining. i mean between my family their is pronunciation differences. some say tomato others say toma`to right? not all English is the same is a concept that makes perfect sense to me. in other countries such as Italy, a person from the north cannot understand a person from the south because they speak in different dialects. perhaps it has to their with their location, or job types. but it holds true that different parts of a country can speak the same language in different ways. 

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, April 8, 2015 3:04 PM

I've seen this collection of maps a number of times before, but they are just as interesting and informative every time I look at them. It's really a fun exercise in seeing what phrases you use or how you pronounce certain words as opposed to the rest of the country. As a Rhode Islander, the bubbler/water fountain divide was of particular interest to me. I also found it funny that I have the vaguely Western/Midwestern tendency of calling "rotaries" (or what are traditionally called rotaries in my area), "roundabouts". This is especially curious to me, because I generally tend to think of that term as a British one. Could this possibly mean that a lot of British immigrants settled in the Western/Midwestern United States? Or am I just mistaken and buying into a poorly informed stereotype about British people?

 

Whatever the case, these maps are very informative and say a lot about the linguistic differences that occur even within one country. Now granted, the United States is a large country, so there is bound to be a good amount of variation. But it's still fascinating to me just how much variety there can be. The fact that when traveling, your use or pronunciation of a certain word or phrase can immediately identify you as an out-of-towner is very interesting. This is yet another example of the importance of doing your own research in order to avoid making incorrect assumptions. Just because all of the people within a geographic border may live in the same country, it does not mean that their dialects or colloquialisms are all the same. It does not even necessarily mean that they speak the same language. Different immigrant groups (because almost no country is impervious to immigration) settle in different areas and this ends up contributing (in part) to the different dialects and expressions that one finds within geographic borders. 

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Finding the True Border Between Yankee and Red Sox Nation Using Facebook Data

Finding the True Border Between Yankee and Red Sox Nation Using Facebook Data | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"By using Facebook data from the 2.5 million people in New York or New England that ‘like’ either the Red Sox or Yankees I was able to create a more accurate rivalry map than ever before."


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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:26 AM

Pretty neat use of mapping and facebook to create this. This map is around the idea of what i expected it to look like with a few exceptions. As a yankee fan i expected a little bit more out of fellow Rhode Islanders when it came to the distribution but i guess i was wrong. i would also like to point out that cultural diversity probably has a role to play in this, with western connecticut being more ethnically diverse than eastern.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 15, 2015 8:13 AM

This map pretty much met my general expectations for the size of Red Sox's and Yankee Nations. Most of New England is clearly Red Sox Nation. As a Yankee fan living in hostile territory, I was heartened to know that Yankee territory is not all that far away.  Connecticut is the true battleground in the fight for more territory. That state serves as the crossroads between New England values and culture, and New York values and culture. I think this map says a lot more about New York and New England than just who supports each baseball team. Sports is often a window into our lives and habits. If you asked me to divide New England from New York, I would probably divide it along these lines.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 4:53 PM

This is a pretty interesting map, I am unsure though if using Facebook is actually an accurate tool of determination for the Yankees and Red Sox borders, but I guess it is alright if someone is just trying to figure out a general idea of what fans live where in the North East. As assumed, most of New England was going to be fans of the Red Sox, and as the more west you went toward NY, that it would change to the Yankees. Clearly though, after looking through the article, Connecticut is where the battle hits hardest, Eastern Conn likes the Red Sox, Western Conn likes the Yankees, with a mix toward the middle. What I find quite interesting though is the map of the Mass/NY line how it shows instantly a diving line between the two teams without crossing borders. 

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Maple Syrup Time

Maple Syrup Time | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

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Louis Culotta's comment, April 8, 2013 11:45 AM
this is cool. A friend of mine bought all the equipment and is making it in the woods in his backyard up in Cumberland.
Mary Burke's comment, April 12, 2013 3:53 PM
When I get pancakes at a restaurant I always ask for real maple syrup. They charge more but its worth it. I venture to say that the Canadian maple syrup subsidies might have something to do with less syrup production around here and also might be why syrup so expensive.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, December 6, 2013 11:53 AM

I actually made maple syrup about a year ago, a couple of roads away from my house.  I know a family that makes it every year, and I was invited to come join them harvesting the syrup.  I had done it there many years ago, but I had a blast.  The father of a guy I went to school with was there boiling the sap, and we had a lot of interesting discussions about the process, including the importance of the climate.  Apparently, if I remember correctly, it is vital to have the freezing temperatures, followed by warm days- which is also mentioned in the article.  He said that gets the "blood" of the tree pumping, and greatly increases the syrup production.  I got to taste the sap as it was being boiled down to concentrated levels, and it was amazing.  I think that using natural resources like that is really cool.  I had a great time, and know that it takes a LOT of sap to make very LITTLE syrup, but it can be totally worth it. I enjoyed gardening when my family had a garden, and I think that that sort of natural harvest and refinement for consumption can be immensely entertaining, as well as rewarding.  I know this family usually makes enough for themselves, and that they give a little away, and end up having enough to get through the year.  It is a really enjoyable activity, and I reccommend it to anyone that doesn't mind getting cold outside or covered in tree sap.