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Lady In Black: 'Burka Avenger' Fights For Pakistan's Girls

Lady In Black: 'Burka Avenger' Fights For Pakistan's Girls | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Burka Avenger is a new Pakistani kids' show about a mild-mannered teacher who moonlights as a burqa-clad superhero.

Via Seth Dixon
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Luisa Pinto's curator insight, August 5, 2013 5:32 AM

Globalização não quer dizer que vamos todos ficar iguais. Nem podia. 

Taryn Coxall's curator insight, August 5, 2013 9:58 PM

"the Burka Avenger" is a new cartoon aired in pakistan aiming to empower pakistani women who wear burkas.

I think this clip is a great resourse for not only empowering pakistani women and girls but to use within the Australian classroom in order to not only expose students to different cultures entertainment but more specifically look at rasism, stereotyoes and different cultures traditons in a fun and enagaging way

Avonna Swartz's curator insight, August 30, 2013 11:15 AM

What do you think of this? Do you think it will have an impact on how women perceive themselves?

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Muslim beauty pageant challenges Miss World contest

Muslim beauty pageant challenges Miss World contest | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"Muslim women from six countries defy western beauty ideals, emphasize spirituality.  Organizers of the event said they wanted to show Muslim women there is an alternative to the idea of beauty put forward by the British-run Miss World pageant. They also stress that opposition to the pageant can be expressed non-violently." 


Via Seth Dixon
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Rawr_adventuretime's comment, October 3, 2013 1:27 PM
This is social because the gender relations is women defying ideas of beauty and expressing beauty through spirit instead of body and looks c:
Mrs. B's curator insight, October 5, 2013 9:34 AM

What do you think?

Hannah Hitchcock's curator insight, December 13, 2013 1:54 PM

This article is a really good example on how beauty is a cultural perception. American pleople have a skewed idea of beauty, those shown above not being in that category. In other countries, these women might be extreamly beautiful, but the American perception doesn't believe the same things.  

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Billboard of U.S. troop embracing Muslim woman ...

Billboard of U.S. troop embracing Muslim woman ... | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Billboard of U.S. troop embracing Muslim woman stirs controversy http://t.co/TWPCBrdND5 (Billboard of U.S. troop embracing Muslim woman ...
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Fertility Rates in Gapminder

Fertility Rates in Gapminder | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"CATHOLIC Argentina, Mexico & Phillippines have more babies born per woman than MUSLIM Indonesia, Iran & Turkey."


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Mathijs Booden's comment, September 28, 2013 3:03 PM
Any mention of Gapminder gets an upvote from me. One of the best resources in and outside of the classroom, period.
jon inge's curator insight, October 11, 2013 5:20 PM

awesome site for development economics

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 6:15 PM

When watching the video it was apparetnt that for Iran during the 1950-early1970's there was an increase in fertility and then decreased to almost 1.32% in 2010. These facts were very interseting to see and the way that we as historians/ georgraphers can predict the future with the past facts.

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The Struggle for Jihad

The Struggle for Jihad | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Two opposing groups battle to define the word jihad on public buses and subways.

Via Seth Dixon
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Kimberly Hordern's comment, April 30, 2013 8:07 AM
It is sad that these people are feeling the negative connotations of people who commit crimes under their own definition of the word jihad. When in actuality the word means to Islamic followers a personal struggle.
Conor McCloskey's comment, April 30, 2013 10:27 AM
Islamic cultural has been isolated and generalized in American society after September 11th, 2001. Because of this, the Islamic religion is often misunderstood or misrepresented. There are extremist factions of every religion, even Christian, though sometimes our culture forgets that. This video is about a Muslim organization that is trying to take back the definition of “jihad” in American society. Since 9/11, the world has been synonymous with violence, though many Muslims do not believe their struggle for a better life with God is a violent struggle.
Cultures are multilayer. While some Muslim’s believe jihad is a holy war, others see it as a personal struggle. American culture has a lot to learn about the Muslim cultures through out the world, including the differences between the extremist and non-extremist factions. Extremist factions tend to get the most press coverage and attention from outsiders because they are by name extreme. It would be interesting to see how this relationship with jihad would differ if September 11th never happened.
Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 4:31 PM
Before seeing this video I had always thought of a Jihad as a religious war started by radical Muslims. After watching I felt bad personally that I had confused this word with something that many people hold as just a goal or a personal struggle for them. I do not know if it is because post-9/11 there was much anti-Islam and anti-muslim sentiment in the US (still are today) and that the word became a radical term in the United States, I don’t know. I agree with Conor and saying that the reason many people know Jihad as a religious war is because of the media attention that radical Islamists receive when they bomb/hurt/kill and that is hurting the image of Muslims and Jihad in America.
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Inside Mecca

For over 1400 years, Mecca has been one of the most important cities in the Arabian Peninsula. By the middle of the 6th century, there were three major settl...

 

As the heart of Islam, Mecca brings in pilgrims from around the world.  This documentary gives a great overview of the historical, spiritual and cultural reasons why this is sacred space to over one billion Muslims.  Additionally, this documentary contains an analysis of the logistics that are a part of the Hajj.  

 

Tags: Islam, tourism, place, transportation, religion, Middle East, culture. 

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Rap, Drugs, And Hijabs: 13 Things You Should Know About Young Iran

Rap, Drugs, And Hijabs: 13 Things You Should Know About Young Iran | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
The future of Iran will be determined by the first post-Revolution generation. Here's what they're like.

Via Seth Dixon
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Siri Anderson's curator insight, August 25, 2013 9:52 AM

Who knew? Would be nice to have students develop some raps that appealed to democratic, peaceful, shared-world sensibilities.

Mrs. B's curator insight, October 5, 2013 9:36 AM

POPULATION PYRAMIDS!

Isabelle Zahn's curator insight, January 18, 3:02 PM

In this article you see the concept of gender population and folk culture. This article talks about how Iran has had their baby boom population in there right now between the mid teens and the mid-20s. It also talks about how all of the young people are starting to control everything and things are becoming run by the young people. Most of the government is run by young people there all of the young people are just starting to pop up and down getting married as you get there I having more kids because it's a big huge population of young people. This has an impact on every music sucks local national and international communities because every community at some point will have a baby boom generation for us right now it's kind of an older generation for other countries the younger generations so really every time she goes through these baby-boom stages. Some short-term effects of this could be a lot of new births because all the people are starting to get a little bit older because their mid teens to mid 20s they will be getting married soon and will want have families.  Some long-term effects could be another baby boom generation possibly coming because of this baby boom generation all the side to have kids that he couldn't another baby boom generation were everybody wants to have a kid so their country may decide to good use birth control or something that will reduce the chances of having another baby good population because their country can't support all of those people. 

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Elderly Woman’s Killing Lays Bare Myanmar’s Religious Divisions

Elderly Woman’s Killing Lays Bare Myanmar’s Religious Divisions | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
The stabbing death of a helpless 94-year-old woman is a stark symbol of the breadth of anti-Muslim feelings in a Buddhist-majority country.
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'The Great Akbar' of Independence struggle - The Hindu

'The Great Akbar' of Independence struggle - The Hindu | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
'The Great Akbar' of Independence struggle The Hindu The Muslim communities were divided by geographical situation, by differences of dialect and custom and, in some cases, by the deeper chasm of sectarianism, but pan-Islamism inflamed their...
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Hijab: Veiled in Controversy

Hijab: Veiled in Controversy | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Hijab is an Islamic concept of modesty and privacy, most notably expressed in women’s clothing that covers most of the body.

Via Seth Dixon
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Norma Ellis's curator insight, September 2, 2013 7:27 AM

 understanding difference

Shelby Porter's comment, September 19, 2013 2:39 PM
The hijab has become a very controversial issue on the global scale. For example, Saudi Arabian and Iran women are required to wear it where as other countries (most recently France) have banned the wearing of such religious garments. Under the U.S. constitutions first amendment of freedom of speech and freedom of religion allows the women to wear them. For many women it is a choice of modesty or a way to show her devotion to her religion. Many people today still are uneducated about the topic and see it as a way these women are being oppressed. Ultimately it is that woman's choice, but it is a shame that in some places it may come with a price.
Mary Rack's comment, September 19, 2013 3:20 PM
Thank you, Shelby!!
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The Struggle for Jihad

The Struggle for Jihad | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Two opposing groups battle to define the word jihad on public buses and subways.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kimberly Hordern's comment, April 30, 2013 8:07 AM
It is sad that these people are feeling the negative connotations of people who commit crimes under their own definition of the word jihad. When in actuality the word means to Islamic followers a personal struggle.
Conor McCloskey's comment, April 30, 2013 10:27 AM
Islamic cultural has been isolated and generalized in American society after September 11th, 2001. Because of this, the Islamic religion is often misunderstood or misrepresented. There are extremist factions of every religion, even Christian, though sometimes our culture forgets that. This video is about a Muslim organization that is trying to take back the definition of “jihad” in American society. Since 9/11, the world has been synonymous with violence, though many Muslims do not believe their struggle for a better life with God is a violent struggle.
Cultures are multilayer. While some Muslim’s believe jihad is a holy war, others see it as a personal struggle. American culture has a lot to learn about the Muslim cultures through out the world, including the differences between the extremist and non-extremist factions. Extremist factions tend to get the most press coverage and attention from outsiders because they are by name extreme. It would be interesting to see how this relationship with jihad would differ if September 11th never happened.
Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 4:31 PM
Before seeing this video I had always thought of a Jihad as a religious war started by radical Muslims. After watching I felt bad personally that I had confused this word with something that many people hold as just a goal or a personal struggle for them. I do not know if it is because post-9/11 there was much anti-Islam and anti-muslim sentiment in the US (still are today) and that the word became a radical term in the United States, I don’t know. I agree with Conor and saying that the reason many people know Jihad as a religious war is because of the media attention that radical Islamists receive when they bomb/hurt/kill and that is hurting the image of Muslims and Jihad in America.