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Three Sustainable Cities on the Rise

Three Sustainable Cities on the Rise | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
The green living lifestyle skyrocketed in the last decade and became a social injection of epic proportions. In no time shoes were being made from bamboo, college towns were turned into tiny Vespa cities, and the canvas bag market boomed like it was being shot from a cannon. Suddenly, shrinking America’s Shaq-sized carbon footprint seemed possible, and everything from water bottles to t-shirts changed their ingredients.

There are plenty of ways to go green and promote sustainable living in your home and community. Beyond simply rolling out the recycle bin to the curb and making eco-chic clutches out of Capri Sun pouches, you can get innovative with your recycling through local waste services like Republic Services in the US and other international equivalents who, by changing the way they take care of trash and recyclables, are making money from your waste. Earth consciousness is perpetually rising, and waste management is following suit. Here’s a quick trip around the globe, looking at three sustainable cities on the rise and what they’re doing to be friendly to the earth...


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The 11 Most Resilient Cities In America

The 11 Most Resilient Cities In America | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
The Rockefeller Foundation's resiliency challenge will give 11 American cities support to improve their ability to bounce back from disaster.

As more of the world's population moves into urban areas, and climate change increases the likelihood of flooding and extreme weather, cities all over the globe will need to strengthen their ability to withstand disasters.

This year, the Rockefeller Foundation is giving a few lucky cities a push with its 100 Resilient Cities challenge, which aims to give metropolises support to design and implement disaster contingency plans.


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ParadigmGallery's curator insight, December 5, 2013 3:52 PM

Interesting , informative post....

By nature, a city's ability to weather disaster is a design issue, one with plenty of potential for design solutions.....

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Ideas on transforming cities - Singapore a case study

Ideas on transforming cities - Singapore a case study | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

'We know that the planet is warming up and the human population is growing, raising our demand for resources. The combination of these factors is why the battle against climate change will be decided in cities, particularly cities in the Asia-Pacific.

These urban centres are triple ‘hot spots’: they face rising temperatures, increasing populations and escalating consumption.

To tackle these challenges, we need practical and successful ideas that can easily be replicated.

 

At the 4th Sustainable Cities Conference last week in Singapore, I discussed ways for Singapore and Hong Kong, already recognised as innovative cities in tackling these problems, to become even greener and establish themselves as leaders in creating sustainable city models for the Asia-Pacific.'


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Luiz F. Costa's comment, May 14, 2013 9:23 AM
E isso temos que incentivar.
Norm Miller's curator insight, May 14, 2013 10:49 AM

Singapore transformed it's economy faster than any other nation in the world.  It is not surprising to see them leading on other dimensions as well.

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Man-Made Cities and Natural Disasters

Man-Made Cities and Natural Disasters | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Patrick assesses the future of world order, state sovereignty, and multilateral cooperation.

 

The 21st century is the dawn of a new era in human history: more people on Earth live in cities than in the countryside.  The impacts of this new basic fact are far-reaching.  One of those is that cities that are in particular environments are more prone to certain natural disasters and will be increasingly vulnerable as their populations increase (especially megacities in the developing world).


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Global cities of the future

Global cities of the future | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Explore the cities and emerging urban clusters that will drive dramatic growth and demographic changes over the next generation. A McKinsey Quarterly Economic Studies article.

 

In the next 13 years, 600 cities will account for nearly 65 percent of global GDP growth. That is reason enough to explore this global dataset with over 2,600 metropolitan areas. 


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Top 7 Websites for creating Future Cities

Top 7 Websites for creating Future Cities | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

Over 50% of the world's population now lives in cities, so the conditions are ripe for improving, adjusting and rethinking the urban landscape and city life. The web flourishes with digital platforms for community discussion, since now it’s city dwellers - rather than governing executives - that actively take part in city-related decision-making...
Check out the following seven websites that harness the power, wisdom and knowledge of the crowds to cultivate smarter future cities.


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China's mega 'solar cities' are great, but sustainability is about scaling stuff down - Blue and Green Tomorrow

China's mega 'solar cities' are great, but sustainability is about scaling stuff down - Blue and Green Tomorrow | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

I recently spent a day in Dezhou, one of China's famed ‘solar cities’.


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Seth Kirby's curator insight, August 29, 2013 8:22 AM

Solar cities and sustainability.

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World Cities and global economics

World Cities and global economics | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Cities are the world's future.Urbanization continues to be a defining trend of international development, particularly in Asia and Africa.  The way that cities develop will have profound, long-term, likely irreversible implications for the...

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GIBS Information Centre / GIBSIC's curator insight, August 14, 2013 3:57 AM

global cities - rankings  -


The chart below shows the latest top 10 city rankings from the Economist’s Most Liveable Cities, Mercer’s Quality of Living, and A.T. Kearney’s Most Global Cities in table form.

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Guardian Cities: welcome to our urban past, present and future - The Guardian

Guardian Cities: welcome to our urban past, present and future - The Guardian | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

We are bombarded with statistics about the future of cities these days, as fast as the cities themselves are growing. More than half of the world's population now live in a city, with the number of urban residents increasing by 60 million each year – that's two new urbanites every second. It is a relentless rate of expansion that will see over 70% of the global population living in urban areas by 2050, requiring the equivalent of a new city of 1 million built every five days between now and then.

 


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Urban Sustainability: The cities of the future will be grown, not built...

Urban Sustainability: The cities of the future will be grown, not built... | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

The cities of the future will have waste-to-energy plants, not shopping malls or churches, at their center, according to urban designer Mitchell Joachim of Terreform ONE.

At DLD Cities in London, he said "cities have centers that celebrate previous centuries -- in Europe, the cities celebrated spirituality, with cathedrals. After some time, the cathedrals became downtown cores- and celebrations of capitalism and commercialism".

The cities of the future will celebrate "the belief of what keeps us alive" - or elements of the city that make our lives better.

 

Terreform ONE, a green design company in Brooklyn, explores biohacks for the ecological issues facing modern cities. For instance, the waste New York City produces every hour weighs as much as the Statue of Liberty - in the future that waste could be recompacted into building blocks, or recycled "bales". Looking beyond recycling, though, it would be even better to create a city which didn't produce waste in the first place...

That means growing thousands of homes -- building a new suburb could involve twisting, pruning and manipulating large trees into the frames of buildings. "There would be no difference between the home and nature -- it would be something that would be a positive addition to the ecology," explained Joachim.

 

For more information on these innovative concepts, including biomimicry and new green technology proposals for future cities, stop by to read the complete article and visit referenced links on urban sustainability...


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This Is The Next Generation Of Global Cities

This Is The Next Generation Of Global Cities | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Cities in lower-income countries are rapidly catching up with the world's top business capitals, according to a new report.

Chicago-based consulting firm A.T. Kearney is predicting the next generation of global cities, based on the speed with whi...

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The world's leading cities for opportunity: a new report on adaptability, resilience & livability

The world's leading cities for opportunity: a new report on adaptability, resilience & livability | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

A new report ranks the world's leading cities for economic, technological, and social opportunity. New York tops the list of the world’s best "cities of opportunity," with London second and Toronto third.

The report gauges 27 of the world’s largest and most influential global cities on their ability to provide opportunity to their residents — both long-term residents and new immigrants.

It seeks to determine the ability of cities not just to grow and develop, but to provide broad opportunities. It addresses the adaptability and resilience of cities and highlights the connection between quality of life, or livability, and long-term economic growth and development.

The 27 cities covered by the report are global powerhouses, accounting for nearly eight percent of global economic output, while housing just 2.5 percent of its population. The report projects that these 27 cities will add 19 million more residents, 13.7 million more jobs, and $3.3 trillion more in economic output by 2025...


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Making Smarter Cities | The Atlantic

Making Smarter Cities | The Atlantic | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

As population growth drives urbanization, the environmental impacts of cities are becoming increasingly important. By 2050, some 90% of the U.S. population and 70% of the world population will live in cities, according to the University of Michigan's Center for Sustainable Systems.

As a result, interest in "smart cities" that provide technologically advanced services and infrastructure is increasing: The global smart city market is projected to cross $1 trillion in 2016, with players such as IBM and Accenture leading the way.

"Successful cities will need to differentiate themselves to attract investment and productive residents," said Ruthbea Yesner Clarke, Research Director of IDC's Smart Cities Strategies, in a recent report. Constrained financial resources, fast-growing populations, and aging infrastructures are driving investment in smart cities, she said.


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Where Are the World's Most Livable Cities?

Where Are the World's Most Livable Cities? | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
The US has some beautiful places, but if you want to root yourself in the world’s most livable city, you’ll need to head Down Under because Melbourne, Australia has again been ranked at the top of the list.

The annual Livability Ranking and Overview assessed living conditions in 140 cities around the world, taking into account 30 factors in five categories: stability, healthcare, culture and environment, education, and infrastructure. Each city was then given a score of 0-100, and Melbourne — with a score of 97.5 — reigned supreme for the second year in a row, earning perfect scores for infrastructure, healthcare and education. The Australian cities of Adelaide, Sydney and Perth also made the top 10.In fact, of the 10 most livable cities, seven were in Australia and Canada. Our neighbors to the north who live in Vancouver, Toronto and Calgary inhabit cities that scored between 97.3 and 96.6 in the review.

But what about the US? Honolulu was the highest-ranked American city on the list, and it came at number 26. Counting the Hawaiian paradise, only nine US cities scored above 90 — the others were Pittsburgh, Washington, DC, Chicago, Atlanta, Miami, Detroit, Boston and Seattle...


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The Top 10 Most Livable Cities of 2012

The Top 10 Most Livable Cities of 2012 | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

The Quality of Living Survey is conducted annually by Mercer to help multinational companies and organizations fairly compensate their employees when assigning them to international placements.
This year, the company evaluated the local living conditions of more than 460 cities worldwide, and the survey was based on 39 factors, divided into 10 categories: Political and social environment, economic environment, socio-cultural environment, medical and health considerations, schools and education, public services and transportation, recreation, consumer goods, housing, and natural environment.

According to the list, European cities still make up the top of the crop this year, seizing eight out of the top ten slots. Among them, Switzerland and Germany proved best-performing, with three cities in the top ten.
In the Asia-Pacific region, Auckland retains its position as the highest-ranking city when it comes to quality of living. China had three cities edged into the top 100 list, with Hong Kong performing best at the 70th place, Taipei ranked 85th, and Shanghai at the 95th spot...


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Cities Threatened By Climate Change

Cities Threatened By Climate Change | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
It's not just flooding: Plenty of other issues—such as rising sea levels and drought—present pressing problems for these urban areas.

Climate change is one of the most serious issues facing the world's cities in the 21st century, but so far policymakers, planners, and scientists have come up with few solutions to prevent—or mitigate—its calamitous effects.

While flooding disasters like Hurricanes Katrina and Sandy have brought attention to the dangers posed by stronger storms, there are plenty of other threats—such as rising sea levels—that might be even more pressing. Wildfires and drought have already heavily damaged the American Southwest, while flooding threatens low-lying island nations.

Visit the link to find which cities that will soon be in danger.


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Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 8:56 AM

This article explains the effects of the climate change has on the city. This shows us that the climate controls the physical setting of a city and if any changes are made in the climate that means that the city will also change with it. In some cases this can dangerous and cause harm to a cities landmark or physical geography. Some issues that are concerning about this is flooding's, hurricane's, and other strong storms.

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New Urban Ideas: 22 Cities Prepare to Pilot the Future

New Urban Ideas:  22 Cities Prepare to Pilot the Future | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

22 cities have called for innovative solutions to solve urban challenges as part of the Citymart urban ideas competition. The aim is to identify & share solutions to challenges that cities face.


The 2012 competition attracted 1,519 entries from 70 countries. Now Aalborg, Barcelona, Boston, Christchurch, Eindhoven, Fukuoka DC, L’Hospitalet, Lagos, Lavasa, London, Maringa, Mexico City, Oulu, Paris, Rio de Janeiro, Rosario, San Francisco, Sant Cugat, Sheffield, Tacoma, Terrassa and York all hope to evoke a similar response.


The cities have presented challenges across a vast array of areas including mobility, economic development, social inclusion, health and well-being, urban management, lighting, energy, culture, future government and sustainable lifestyles...


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"Million" Cities

"Million" Cities | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

From TD-architects Theo Deutinger Rotterdam.

 

Rome was the first city with one million residents, with that occuring in 5 BC.  Over a thousand years later, London and Beijing joined that group as industrialization became the impetus for wide-scale urbanization.  Today we are seeing an explosion of "million cities" throughout the world. 


Tags: urban, megacities, unit 7 cities.


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Seth Dixon's comment, September 21, 2012 1:51 PM
The data is from 2006, so it's a little dated, but still useful.
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The other 'middleweights': new hopes for old cities in the West

The other 'middleweights': new hopes for old cities in the West | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
A bold future may await rust belt cities in North America and Europe if asset manager Pippa Malmgren's vision of smart manufacturing hubs and recent research on revitalised industrial centres come to fruition.

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The rise of China’s secondary cities

The rise of China’s secondary cities | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
From Wuhan to Chongqing, Chengdu to Hangzhou, China’s second tier cities are emerging as business hubs for both international and domestic executives.

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GIBS Information Centre / GIBSIC's curator insight, June 29, 2013 4:39 AM

China: secondary cities  - " The statistics add up. By 2025, the Asian nation will have 221 cities with more than a million residents. Currently there are 160 cities in China with this figure, compared with only 35 in Europe, according to management consultancy firm, McKinsey.   -    China also has the largest number of hotels (by room count) in the pipeline. At 406,480 rooms, the country accounts for a third of all global rooms under development, with more than 1,500 hotels planned, many of which will be in secondary cities, reports Lodging Econometrics, a market research company."

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Cities and cars – a love affair or a marriage gone bad? - The Networked Society Blog

Cities and cars – a love affair or a marriage gone bad? - The Networked Society Blog | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Cities and cars – a love affair or a marriage gone bad? http://t.co/XE8DGYfVyY

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Our future in cities

Our future in cities | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Humanity's future is the future of cities. Explore the crowded favelas, greened-up blocks and futuristic districts that could shape the future of cities -- and take a profane, hilarious side trip to the suburbs.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 5, 8:08 PM

Cities are changing the world at a rapid rate.

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These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today

These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

" The Smithsonian Magazine recently dipped into David Rumsey's collection of over 150,000 maps to find some of the best representations of American cities over the past couple hundred years. With some simple programming, they were able to overlay images of vintage maps of some major cities onto satellite images from today. The results are fascinating."


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Tom cockburn's comment, September 20, 2013 5:09 PM
Absolutely agree,Marian!
Amy Marques's curator insight, February 6, 5:09 PM

These maps are a great way to see what North American cities used to look like in comparison to what they are now. Some great transformations are Chicago and NYC.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 11:56 AM

The Smithsonian Magazine overlayed maps of American cities for the past centuries with modern satellite images to show differences in the development and planning and the growth of the cities.

The growth and change of the cities changed over the years on how it was achieved and how far it could be expanded due to new technology and movement of people to urban areas. The technology helped achieved a certain hold over the environment to build more urban spaces. 

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Achieving sustainable, inclusive cities requires better planning - UN News Centre

Achieving sustainable, inclusive cities requires better planning - UN News Centre | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

Top United Nations officials have underscored the need to better plan the world’s urban areas, where half of the global population currently resides, to turn the ideal of sustainable and inclusive cities into reality.

“In little more than a generation, two thirds of the global population will be urban. As the proportion of humanity living in the urban environment grows, so too does the need to strengthen the urban focus of our efforts to reduce global poverty and promote sustainable development,” said Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.

In his message for World Habitat Day, Mr. Ban noted that better planned and better functioning cities can help ensure that everyone who lives there has adequate shelter, water, sanitation, health and other basic services. He also noted they promote education and job prospects, energy-efficient buildings and public transport systems, and a feeling of inclusiveness for inhabitants.

According to the UN Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat), the main challenges confronting cities and towns all over the world today include unemployment, especially among youth; social and economic inequalities; and unsustainable energy consumption patterns.

Urban areas are also responsible for most of the world’s waste and pollution.

 

“We should create a new type of city – the city of the 21st century – a smart, people-centred city, one that is capable of integrating the tangible and more intangible aspects of prosperity; a city able to rid itself of the inefficient, unsustainable urban habits of the previous century,” said Joan Clos, UN-Habitat’s Executive Director.

“It is time for changing our cities and for building new opportunities,” he stated...

 

Read further to learn more about the social, economic and cultural components of sustainable cities and urban growth, and the latest in the global dialogue on green development and conscientious planning and how they contribute to a healthier economy, engaged communities, and increased social equity.


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The New Architecture of Smart Cities

The New Architecture of Smart Cities | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
What makes a city a “Smart City” as opposed to a city where some “smart things” happen?


Three criteria for answering that question clearly stand out:


Smart Cities are led from the top – they have a strong and visionary leader championing the Smart agenda across the city. Smart Cities have a stakeholder forum – they have drawn together a community of city stakeholders across the city. Those stakeholders have not only created a compelling vision for a Smart City; they have committed to taking an ongoing role coordinating a program to deliver it. Smart Cities invest in technology infrastructure – they are deploying the required information and communication technology (ICT) platforms across the city, and doing so in such a way as to support the integration of information and activity across city systems.

 

It’s also important, though, to consider what is different about the structure and organization of city systems in a Smart City. How does a city decide which technology infrastructures are required? Which organizations will make use of them, and how? How can they be designed and delivered so that they effectively serve individuals, communities and businesses in the city? What other structures and processes are required to achieve this progress in a Smart City?

 

Read on to learn about the design of the infrastructures and systems of Smart Cities and view  them visually represented in an accompanying diagram.


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