AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013
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Understanding Global Statistics

Understanding Global Statistics | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it

"Infographics to explain global statistics."


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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:11 PM

If the World was 100 People shows the statistics of the world as in smaller proportions allowing them to be easily visualized.

Some of the graphics divide the people into regions and nationalities mainly as Formal by continents .

Virgínia Mareco's comment, May 15, 7:04 PM
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Virgínia Mareco's comment, May 15, 7:04 PM
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Expat Explorer Survey

Expat Explorer Survey | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it
If you were moving abroad, what would you want to know? Find out the results from the largest ever global independent survey of expats. Gain a unique insight into how expat life differs across the globe.

 

The labor market is increasingly becoming a global market.  These countries are the leading places for expatriate workers based on economic and experience factors (according to a survey by HSBC).  You can adjust the criteria to see how these 30 countries as destinations for workers that aren't afraid to move internationally.

 

Tags: labor, globalization, industry, economic.


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80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks

80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it

The green dots on this map representing Starbucks locations which are obviously clustered in major metropolitan centers.  Cross-referencing this Starbucks address location with population data, Davenport explains his mapping technique: "By counting the number of people who live within a given distance to each Starbucks, we can measure how well centered Frappuccinos are to the US citizenry. In other words: draw a 1-mile circle around every store, then add up the % of the population living within the circles. Repeat for 2, 3, 4....100 miles."   The result of this data is a fabulous logrithmic S-curve which explains much about the American population distribution.   

 

Tags: statistics, density, consumption, mapping, visualization, urban.


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Rich's comment, October 10, 2012 1:26 PM
That is insane how large that corperation is.
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Geographic Analysis of 2012 Presidential Election

Geographer Andy Baker provides an excellent spatial analysis of the key voting patterns that will shape the 2012 presidential election in the United States.

 

Tags: political, statistics, spatial, regions, USA.


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Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 14, 2012 3:24 PM
This video was very helpful for me because the speaker clearly gave visual examples of the many topics that can steer certain voters in the U.S. to vote a certain way, during election time. It helped me better interpret political data, since I am a visual learner.
Betty Denise's comment, October 15, 2012 6:19 AM
RT the comment !
Frank Fenn's comment, March 2, 2013 2:09 AM
I used this during the Political Unit. I find that 9th graders know nothing about politics beyond what concerns them at the moment. Stretching their brain back to when they were 7 helps build the political foundations of the future!
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Interactive Map: Where Americans Are Moving

Interactive Map: Where Americans Are Moving | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it
More than 10 million Americans moved from one county to another during 2008. The map below visualizes those moves. Click on any county to see comings and goings: black lines indicate net inward movement, red lines net outward movement.

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Mark V's comment, August 27, 2012 11:15 AM
I thought this was interesting showing the flight from the northeast and midwest
Natalie K Jensen's curator insight, January 30, 2013 10:45 AM

This is a dynamic illustration of international migration in the US that fits nicely within Chapter 3.

Ellen Van Daele's curator insight, March 22, 2015 4:51 PM

This map show the immigration and emigration of people in the United States. It gives you a visual representation of all the people moving in and out of an area. 

 

Something I noticed by looking at the map was that there are a huge amount of people leaving and moving in the major cities. Initially I thought that there would be a larger income than outcome in the big cities but the flow seemed pretty stable.

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100 People: A World Portrait

100 People: A World Portrait | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it

This is the truly global project that asks the children of the world to introduce us to the people of the world.  We've seen videos and resources that ask the question, "if there were only 100 people in the world, what would it look like?"  This takes that idea of making demographic statistics more meaningful one step further by asking student in schools for around the world to nominate some "representative people" and share their stories.  The site houses videos, galleries from each continent and analyze themes that all societies must deal with.  This site that looks at the people and places on out planet to promote greater appreciation of cultural diversity and understanding is a great find. 

 

Tags: Worldwide, statistics, K12, education, comparison.


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Canberra Girls Grammar GSSF's curator insight, September 1, 2013 10:43 PM

Year 7 Liveability Unit 2

savvy's curator insight, September 3, 2014 12:57 PM

This just makes me realize how the world would be if we only had 100 people rather than the billions we have now.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, February 26, 2015 7:24 AM

A face das crianças no mundo

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American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration

American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it

"David Greene talks to writer Jeremy Miller about the American Centroid. That's the place where an imaginary, flat, weightless and rigid map of the U.S. would balance perfectly if all 300 million of us weighed the exact same."


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:23 AM

The centre of population in the USA has moved further inland and southward compared to Australia. Comparing urbanisation in USA and Australia.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, November 11, 2013 10:33 PM

Informative, short podcast that details the changing migration of the US. This allows for the comparison of migration and time and the effects of migration over the years in the US. 

Emily Bian's curator insight, October 17, 2014 7:32 PM

The center of the U.S. population moves about every 10 years. 

In our APHUG textbook, it also talked about the center moving west. It also talks about the patterns and shifts of migration in the U.S going more west and south now, than before. I wonder if the trend will continue?  

It relates because we talked about this map in APHUG class, and it was in the textbook. The population trend is moving Southwest.

This is interesting for next year's APHUG students, because they get to see a population trend right in the US! It's a good article to think about why population trends are the way it is.

2) migration

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Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

 

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct places and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.

 

Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.


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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:55 PM

Unit 2

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:03 PM

This video describes and explains how we got to a population of 7 billion people so fast

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:04 PM

It also uses water to demonstrate it.

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The Economic and Political Impact of Immigrants, Latinos and Asians State by State

The Economic and Political Impact of Immigrants, Latinos and Asians State by State | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it

Not every state is equally impacted by migration, and the demographic profile of migrants is different for every state. This is an online mapping tool to search a large database that can give the user state specific information about the impact of economics and politics based on migration from Latin America and Asia on any given state.

 

Tags: Immigration, unit 2 population, migration, economic, statistics, mapping, political.


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Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 26, 2014 12:43 PM

Unit 2 population and migration 

This map shows the population of migrants in certain states and compares them to other states. This demographic specifically highlights Texas and shows its migrant information. Texas has the highest immigrant income out of all of the states. Also Texas has very few naturalized citizens who used to be an immigrant.

This map relates to unit 2 because it shows the illegal immigration. And immigration theories. This proves ravensteins laws correct because it shows how people move a short distance to migrate, knowing that most migrants to America come from Latin America. This map is a great example of ravensteins theories and unit 2

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Woman Stats Project

Woman Stats Project | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it

"The WomanStats Project is the most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of women in the world. The Project facilitates understanding the linkage between the situation of women and the security of nation-states. We comb the extant literature and conduct expert interviews to find qualitative and quantitative information on over 310 indicators of women's status in 174 countries. Our Database expands daily, and access to it is free of charge."

 

With assistance from the Geography Dept. at Brigham Young University, the WomanStats Project provides important data and maps regarding issues of gender, access and equity with a spatial perspective.  


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Brandon Murphy's comment, July 9, 2012 6:53 PM
I think this just reinforces the factual information that we already know of about how different cultures across the world treat women in all regards/aspects of life.
Don Brown Jr's comment, July 9, 2012 9:51 PM
This information provided from this map reveals much more to the observer than the security of women. From looking at the location of the wealthiest counties in the world, I can make a connection between women’s rights and economic strength, education, birth rates as well as life expectancy in different regions of the globe.
Erin McLeod's curator insight, August 6, 2015 10:56 PM

interesting human geography standpoint

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Population clock for every country

Population clock for every country | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it
Real time statistics for current population of any country. Real time data on population, births, deaths, net migration and population growth.

 

This site shows various demographic statistics for every country including some based on projections in demographic trends in the given country.  If the current trends hold (which they won't, but that is still an interesting measure), the entire Japanese population will disappear in 1,000 years according to this Global Post article: http://www.globalpost.com/dispatches/news/regions/asia-pacific/japan/population-clock-shows-japan-faces-extinction-1000-years


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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 2014 10:17 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the population growth theme because it utilizes all of the indicators we learned in this class, including CBR, CDR, net migration rates, and population growth rates.

Riley Tuggle's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:51 AM

I believe India has more men than women because sometimes when women can't have a son for their first or second child, the men would beat the women to death, or in some instances women are captured and sold for wives, and they may commit suicide they are so depressed. Also, some pregnant women find out their baby is a girl, they would aport or abandon her because sons are apparently more important and successful because they would stay home and take care of their parents when they are elderly and they would carry on the families name. -rt

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:22 AM

This is fantastic - have a look at various countries and their 'rate' of growth