AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013
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1/5 of Humanity

1/5 of Humanity | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it

"The world divided into 5 regions, each with the population of China."


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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, September 11, 2013 3:10 PM

Your thoughts...?

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:42 AM

This map is mind blowning to try to grasp. To think that India has an equvilant population to every country in the Americans has me dumbfounded. Then comparin the economic instability of India to all the economic juggernauts that fit into the light blue regions really shows how poor the distrubution of wealth and population is throught the world.

Trish Pearson's curator insight, April 9, 2014 3:33 PM

A little perspective on population

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American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration

American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it

"David Greene talks to writer Jeremy Miller about the American Centroid. That's the place where an imaginary, flat, weightless and rigid map of the U.S. would balance perfectly if all 300 million of us weighed the exact same."


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:23 AM

The centre of population in the USA has moved further inland and southward compared to Australia. Comparing urbanisation in USA and Australia.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, November 11, 2013 10:33 PM

Informative, short podcast that details the changing migration of the US. This allows for the comparison of migration and time and the effects of migration over the years in the US. 

Emily Bian's curator insight, October 17, 2014 7:32 PM

The center of the U.S. population moves about every 10 years. 

In our APHUG textbook, it also talked about the center moving west. It also talks about the patterns and shifts of migration in the U.S going more west and south now, than before. I wonder if the trend will continue?  

It relates because we talked about this map in APHUG class, and it was in the textbook. The population trend is moving Southwest.

This is interesting for next year's APHUG students, because they get to see a population trend right in the US! It's a good article to think about why population trends are the way it is.

2) migration

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Woman Stats Project

Woman Stats Project | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it

"The WomanStats Project is the most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of women in the world. The Project facilitates understanding the linkage between the situation of women and the security of nation-states. We comb the extant literature and conduct expert interviews to find qualitative and quantitative information on over 310 indicators of women's status in 174 countries. Our Database expands daily, and access to it is free of charge."

 

With assistance from the Geography Dept. at Brigham Young University, the WomanStats Project provides important data and maps regarding issues of gender, access and equity with a spatial perspective.  


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Brandon Murphy's comment, July 9, 2012 6:53 PM
I think this just reinforces the factual information that we already know of about how different cultures across the world treat women in all regards/aspects of life.
Don Brown Jr's comment, July 9, 2012 9:51 PM
This information provided from this map reveals much more to the observer than the security of women. From looking at the location of the wealthiest counties in the world, I can make a connection between women’s rights and economic strength, education, birth rates as well as life expectancy in different regions of the globe.
Erin McLeod's curator insight, August 6, 2015 10:56 PM

interesting human geography standpoint

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The Shifting Geography of Black America

The Shifting Geography of Black America | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it

"While many northern cities did see anemic growth or even losses in black population, and many southern cities saw their black population surge, the real story actually extends well beyond the notion of a monolithic return to the South."

 

Demographics, culture, scale, region are some of the applications available. 


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David Lizotte's curator insight, January 24, 2015 4:33 PM

This was a pretty cool article. I liked how it started with this specific census being the least broadcasted/talked about compared to any other census. The first thing that came to my mind once reading this is racism... In either case, it was a good read.

Throughout the article I kept thinking about natural reasons why people move. For example, its too hot, the winter is a burden, but also natural disasters, like Katrina. I know there was a large population of Katrina refugees whom fled to Texas, specifically Houston, right after the Hurricane struck. This of course would explain the sudden increase in the black population of Houston but also why the population has not increased or rather gone down over the past 5-10 years.

Im sure natural disasters as well as the basic weather motivate individuals to move but the socioeconomic reasoning cannot be ignored. For example the article mentioned lower cost(s) of living in certain cities migrated to by African Americans. A cheaper cost of living is attractive to any one person whom is strapped for cash. Social reasoning can be determined through racial issues in certain cities, education, family or rather long distance family/friend relations. 

This article was written in 2011. It would be interesting to view the most recent census in regards to this topic. As well as brainstorm the statistics and why they are... the way they are. 

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"Population Education"

"Population Education" | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it
Population Education...

 

This site has resources tailored for elementary, middle and high school (and very adaptable and applicable for several college courses).  The site, the education wing of populationconnection.com, recently has updated their content with a new emphasis on what the world will be like at 7 billion.  Games, readings, videos, quizzes, etc. 


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Grammie's comment, September 13, 2011 2:03 PM
great,I couldn't agree more, G
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Population clock for every country

Population clock for every country | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it
Real time statistics for current population of any country. Real time data on population, births, deaths, net migration and population growth.

 

This site shows various demographic statistics for every country including some based on projections in demographic trends in the given country.  If the current trends hold (which they won't, but that is still an interesting measure), the entire Japanese population will disappear in 1,000 years according to this Global Post article: http://www.globalpost.com/dispatches/news/regions/asia-pacific/japan/population-clock-shows-japan-faces-extinction-1000-years


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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 2014 10:17 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the population growth theme because it utilizes all of the indicators we learned in this class, including CBR, CDR, net migration rates, and population growth rates.

Riley Tuggle's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:51 AM

I believe India has more men than women because sometimes when women can't have a son for their first or second child, the men would beat the women to death, or in some instances women are captured and sold for wives, and they may commit suicide they are so depressed. Also, some pregnant women find out their baby is a girl, they would aport or abandon her because sons are apparently more important and successful because they would stay home and take care of their parents when they are elderly and they would carry on the families name. -rt

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:22 AM

This is fantastic - have a look at various countries and their 'rate' of growth

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Beyond 7 Billion

Beyond 7 Billion | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it
After remaining stable for most of human history, the world's population has exploded over the last two centuries. The boom is not over: The biggest generation in history is just entering its childbearing years.

 

The Los Angeles Times has produced an in-depth interactive feature centered around the impact of an increasing global population.  With videos, population clocks, narrated graphics, maps, photos and articles, this is treasure trove of resources that cuts across many disciplines. 


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Trisha Klancar's comment, August 21, 2012 2:34 PM
Great link, thanks!
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Declining Fertility Rates

Declining Fertility Rates | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it
The American birthrate is at a record low. What happens when having it all means not having children?

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Zakkary Catera's comment, September 13, 2013 12:36 AM
Children are our legacy, they are our future, and if the birth rate keeps depleting then who will be here to be pur next scientists or doctors? Then again a plus to this situation is how much lower the birth rate is, the more resources we have to equally share (i.e oil, food water etc.)
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:34 AM

In recent research people found that some women are content with not having any children. People might think this way because without a child people are able to do more things like go out or travel. Some may not want children due to expenses. If more people do not want children birth rates could decline over the years.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:23 PM

Not to bulky on information but it gets its point across. why are theyre so many social stigmas around having a kid?  A kid cost a little over a million dollars to raise why should it be looked down apon for choosing not to take the finacial and physical hardship. I personally have been on the fence about the subject because Im not a fan of this world is coming to and i wouldnt want to have someone I dearly care about to have to go through it. But thats neither hear nor there. 

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Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

 

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct places and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.

 

Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.


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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:55 PM

Unit 2

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:03 PM

This video describes and explains how we got to a population of 7 billion people so fast

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:04 PM

It also uses water to demonstrate it.

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Interactive maps Mexico-USA migration channels

Interactive maps  Mexico-USA migration channels | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it
In several previous posts we have looked at specific migration channels connecting Mexico to the USA: From Morelos to Minnesota; case study of a migrant...

 

An excellent way to show examples of chain migration and the gravity model...students will understand the concepts with concretes examples. These interactive maps have crisp geo-visualizations of the migratory flows.


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, February 3, 2015 4:09 PM

When it comes to ethnic groups in the United States, many of the hispanic/mexican ancestors occur in the southwestern area of the United States. That's obviously because Mexico is southwest of the United States. When it comes to emigrating from Mexico, individuals immigrate to the United States (mostly southwest of the United States) so they can live a different, hopefully better economy. Plus, they try to escape the gang violence and drug violence in Mexico.

Alexa Earl's curator insight, March 14, 2015 1:05 PM

This is a good representation of chain migration.

Devyn Hantgin's curator insight, April 3, 2015 1:46 PM

Migration

This map show the most popular migratory flows of migration from Mexico to the US. 

This ties into our unit about migration because many Mexicans migrate to the US every year. This map shows the patterns and paths of the migration. 

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7 Billion, National Geographic Magazine

See photos from 7 Billion: http://bit.ly/hhYz3m With the worldwide population expected to exceed seven billion in 2011, National Geographic magazine offers a...

 

This video provides excellent material for discussing population growth, space and sustainability.


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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:03 PM

The increase in global population is definitely a hot button topic in today's world. Many wonder if the planet will be able to really sustain so many new people, and if it can truly sustain our current number of humans. This video does a good job of addressing these problems and presenting how things will likely come to be. Our planet is capable of producing great amounts of food and material the real hurdle comes down to how well nations will cooperate. Unfortunately politics and money seem to be the real snagging point in the distribution of aid and resources to many.  

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 2015 4:25 PM

The rapid growth occurring is staggering.  I believe we do need to start thinking about the future in generations.  Where will we be in 50-100 years and where do we need to be.  So basically you need to start thinking about your childrens' childrens' future.  We need to make changes to sustain the increase in population.  

Erin McLeod's curator insight, August 6, 2015 10:55 PM

Geography - Human Population in senior school

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Development and Demographic Changes: "The last woman..".

Development and Demographic Changes: "The last woman..". | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it

While global population now is almost reaching 7 billion, mainly to due high birth rates in the developing world, many of the more developed parts of Asia (and elsewhere) are facing shrinking population as fewer women are choosing to marry and have children. 

 

This is a very concrete way to discuss the Demographic Transition Model and population issues around the world.   Cultural values shifting, globalization and demographics all merge together in this issue. 


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Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 20, 2015 2:05 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This article is about how many countries in the world are experiencing a shrinking population in women. In about 83 countries women are going on marriage strikes by refusing to get married. This has caused a severe drop in the amount of women being born. There are predictions that some countries such as Hong Kong will see their last woman born in the year 2798. Many places are now trying to encourage people to have daughters in order to offset the low female composition. 

 

This relates to unit 2 because it deals with population and sex composition. In man countries the female population is dramatically dropping and scientist are predicting women to die out. This also relates to government policies because some places are trying to change the outcome and encourage females. This shows what technology and visualization of populations can do to predict the future. 

Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 2015 7:25 PM

Summary:  This article provides an optimistic outlook on future population growth.  Stating that in wealthy countries and cities with no migration population may even disappear.  

 

Insight:  While this article seems very hard to believe considering what we've learned I think it represents Unit 2 very well because it still analyzes population growth over time based on female wealth.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, March 23, 2015 10:36 PM

This article illustrated how women are becoming more independent and educated. The article tells you that women, "... are preferring the single life, to marital yoke." This leads to the decrease of fertility rates. As women start to focus more on themselves and their career; instead of building a family, they tend to wait on having kids. This trend is occuring especially in Asian countries. Statistics from the UN conclude that if fertility rates don't increase, in 83 countries, women will not have daughters to replace them. For example Hong Kong, it is predicted that 1,000 women will only produce 547 daughters. The drop is now having reseachers predict when populations will see, "...birth of its last women". The female population in Hong will decrease from 3.75 million to 1 million in 25 generations. Researchers say Hong Kong will see the last, "...birth of its last women" in 2798!  The article used a country-year diagram to show what year the countries will see the last birth of its women.

 

This article relates to topics in Unit 2: Population and Migration. It uses a composition model to organize and efficiently show its data. The article and model shows patterns of fertility and prediction and facts of how a change in the lifestyle of women are affecting populations all over the world. Populations are greatly affected to the point where they can become eradicated. The article was really interesting and I was surprised at how short the predicted amount of time is for the last birth of a women in a population. This article also really illustrates and reveal how women play a big part in - what was- a man dominating world.

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Younger Africa

Younger Africa | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it
Across Africa, a continent where the average age is about 19, protests have flared against leaders who may have outstayed their welcome.

 

This interactive mapping feature compares two distinct data sets in an attempt to show that the two are correlated on the continent of Africa.  The base layer of this thematic map is demographic, noting how much of the overall population in a given country is under the age of 16.  The interactive feature with point data describes the political unrest or instability in that particular country. 

 

Questions to ponder: Does the cartographer 'convince' you that Africa's having a very young (globally speaking) demographic cohort led towards greater political instability?  Are there other factors worth considering?  What does this map and it's embedded data tell us?    

 

Tags: Africa, political, conflict, unit 4 political, states, governance, population, demographics, unit 2 population. 


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