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NYTimes: Measuring the Recession’s Toll

NYTimes: Measuring the Recession’s Toll | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it
Which states had the largest change in poverty rates and median household incomes from 2007 to 2010.

 

Excellent interactive set of maps that you can use to teach economic geography, but with a nice easy way to make the lesson locally relevant.


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Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 9:49 AM

This article measures the recession toll's through out the country. It shows both the unemployment rate from 2007 to 2010 and how families yearly incomes from 2007 to 2010. It is comparing how much money used to be able to be made to now the shortage of both jobs and money

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Interactive maps Mexico-USA migration channels

Interactive maps  Mexico-USA migration channels | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it
In several previous posts we have looked at specific migration channels connecting Mexico to the USA: From Morelos to Minnesota; case study of a migrant...

 

An excellent way to show examples of chain migration and the gravity model...students will understand the concepts with concretes examples. These interactive maps have crisp geo-visualizations of the migratory flows.


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, February 3, 4:09 PM

When it comes to ethnic groups in the United States, many of the hispanic/mexican ancestors occur in the southwestern area of the United States. That's obviously because Mexico is southwest of the United States. When it comes to emigrating from Mexico, individuals immigrate to the United States (mostly southwest of the United States) so they can live a different, hopefully better economy. Plus, they try to escape the gang violence and drug violence in Mexico.

Alexa Earl's curator insight, March 14, 1:05 PM

This is a good representation of chain migration.

Devyn Hantgin's curator insight, April 3, 1:46 PM

Migration

This map show the most popular migratory flows of migration from Mexico to the US. 

This ties into our unit about migration because many Mexicans migrate to the US every year. This map shows the patterns and paths of the migration. 

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The Shifting Geography of Black America

The Shifting Geography of Black America | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it

"While many northern cities did see anemic growth or even losses in black population, and many southern cities saw their black population surge, the real story actually extends well beyond the notion of a monolithic return to the South."

 

Demographics, culture, scale, region are some of the applications available. 


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David Lizotte's curator insight, January 24, 4:33 PM

This was a pretty cool article. I liked how it started with this specific census being the least broadcasted/talked about compared to any other census. The first thing that came to my mind once reading this is racism... In either case, it was a good read.

Throughout the article I kept thinking about natural reasons why people move. For example, its too hot, the winter is a burden, but also natural disasters, like Katrina. I know there was a large population of Katrina refugees whom fled to Texas, specifically Houston, right after the Hurricane struck. This of course would explain the sudden increase in the black population of Houston but also why the population has not increased or rather gone down over the past 5-10 years.

Im sure natural disasters as well as the basic weather motivate individuals to move but the socioeconomic reasoning cannot be ignored. For example the article mentioned lower cost(s) of living in certain cities migrated to by African Americans. A cheaper cost of living is attractive to any one person whom is strapped for cash. Social reasoning can be determined through racial issues in certain cities, education, family or rather long distance family/friend relations. 

This article was written in 2011. It would be interesting to view the most recent census in regards to this topic. As well as brainstorm the statistics and why they are... the way they are. 

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The Beginning of the End for Suburban America

The Beginning of the End for Suburban America | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it
The Beginning of the End for Suburban America...

 

A provocative title, but are our cities and urban settlement patterns shifting?  Is sprawl going to be curtailed by cultural, environmental and economic forces?


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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 15, 2014 1:34 PM

This article shows how trends in energy consumption and the economy can affect geographies of development. After WWII, the United States hit an unprecedented economic boom. Large amounts of cheap oil combined with economic growth spurred the development of infrastructure and cities dependent on automobiles. Since people no longer had to live in the cities to work in them, they began developed outside of the city. Today, oil is becoming more and more expensive, which could mean the end of the age of the automobile. Since cities remain to be hubs of employment and business, people can no longer afford to drive long distances for their daily commutes. People are beginning to move into cities or along public transportation lines in order to more feasibly get to work. 

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, January 29, 2:39 PM

Over the past 10-15 years, the suburbs grew dramatically, and have become less popular.  In the early 2000s it thrived because the economy was doing well, and technological advances were in hyper speed.  I was a bit shocked that it's slowed and that it's being reported that suburbs are coming to an end, but then it it started to make sense.  The unemployment rate was extremely high, as were gas prices.  It only makes sense that less people would be building or buying larger home with bigger cars and more appliances.  But, it was possibly better for our environment.  Less miles being driven means less pollution by cars, less electricity being used never hurts.  But now, gas prices have dropped again, and the unemployment rate has dropped as well. But, today we have so many alternatives to gasoline run cars and common electricity, that even if suburbs made a huge comeback, they wouldn't be the same as they were before.

hailey thornton's curator insight, March 10, 10:08 AM

Just one look at this photo scares me.  i live out in the middle of nowhere with now neighbors anywhere near me . to live where these people live would be terrible. no backyard to play in, no privacy would be my biggest concern. this is the way our grandchildren will be living with houses ten feet away from their home. 

[H.T.]

 

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MapMaker-National Geographic Education

MapMaker-National Geographic Education | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it
Customize one-page maps and download, email, print, or share!

 

Want to make a custom map don't have a cartographic background or access to GIS software?  This online program will give you what you need. 


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"Population Education"

"Population Education" | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it
Population Education...

 

This site has resources tailored for elementary, middle and high school (and very adaptable and applicable for several college courses).  The site, the education wing of populationconnection.com, recently has updated their content with a new emphasis on what the world will be like at 7 billion.  Games, readings, videos, quizzes, etc. 


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Grammie's comment, September 13, 2011 2:03 PM
great,I couldn't agree more, G
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Development and Demographic Changes: "The last woman..".

Development and Demographic Changes: "The last woman..". | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it

While global population now is almost reaching 7 billion, mainly to due high birth rates in the developing world, many of the more developed parts of Asia (and elsewhere) are facing shrinking population as fewer women are choosing to marry and have children. 

 

This is a very concrete way to discuss the Demographic Transition Model and population issues around the world.   Cultural values shifting, globalization and demographics all merge together in this issue. 


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Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 20, 2:05 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This article is about how many countries in the world are experiencing a shrinking population in women. In about 83 countries women are going on marriage strikes by refusing to get married. This has caused a severe drop in the amount of women being born. There are predictions that some countries such as Hong Kong will see their last woman born in the year 2798. Many places are now trying to encourage people to have daughters in order to offset the low female composition. 

 

This relates to unit 2 because it deals with population and sex composition. In man countries the female population is dramatically dropping and scientist are predicting women to die out. This also relates to government policies because some places are trying to change the outcome and encourage females. This shows what technology and visualization of populations can do to predict the future. 

Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 7:25 PM

Summary:  This article provides an optimistic outlook on future population growth.  Stating that in wealthy countries and cities with no migration population may even disappear.  

 

Insight:  While this article seems very hard to believe considering what we've learned I think it represents Unit 2 very well because it still analyzes population growth over time based on female wealth.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, March 23, 10:36 PM

This article illustrated how women are becoming more independent and educated. The article tells you that women, "... are preferring the single life, to marital yoke." This leads to the decrease of fertility rates. As women start to focus more on themselves and their career; instead of building a family, they tend to wait on having kids. This trend is occuring especially in Asian countries. Statistics from the UN conclude that if fertility rates don't increase, in 83 countries, women will not have daughters to replace them. For example Hong Kong, it is predicted that 1,000 women will only produce 547 daughters. The drop is now having reseachers predict when populations will see, "...birth of its last women". The female population in Hong will decrease from 3.75 million to 1 million in 25 generations. Researchers say Hong Kong will see the last, "...birth of its last women" in 2798!  The article used a country-year diagram to show what year the countries will see the last birth of its women.

 

This article relates to topics in Unit 2: Population and Migration. It uses a composition model to organize and efficiently show its data. The article and model shows patterns of fertility and prediction and facts of how a change in the lifestyle of women are affecting populations all over the world. Populations are greatly affected to the point where they can become eradicated. The article was really interesting and I was surprised at how short the predicted amount of time is for the last birth of a women in a population. This article also really illustrates and reveal how women play a big part in - what was- a man dominating world.

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Interactive Map: Where Americans Are Moving

Interactive Map: Where Americans Are Moving | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it
More than 10 million Americans moved from one county to another during 2008. The map below visualizes those moves. Click on any county to see comings and goings: black lines indicate net inward movement, red lines net outward movement.

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Mark V's comment, August 27, 2012 11:15 AM
I thought this was interesting showing the flight from the northeast and midwest
Natalie K Jensen's curator insight, January 30, 2013 10:45 AM

This is a dynamic illustration of international migration in the US that fits nicely within Chapter 3.

Ellen Van Daele's curator insight, March 22, 4:51 PM

This map show the immigration and emigration of people in the United States. It gives you a visual representation of all the people moving in and out of an area. 

 

Something I noticed by looking at the map was that there are a huge amount of people leaving and moving in the major cities. Initially I thought that there would be a larger income than outcome in the big cities but the flow seemed pretty stable.

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Geography Strikes Back

Geography Strikes Back | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it
To understand today's global conflicts, forget economics and technology and take a hard look at a map, writes Robert D. Kaplan.

 

This is a timely article that shows the importance of geography in understanding current events throughout the world.  Also included in this link are videos and pictures connected to an interactive map that highlights a few global conflicts.  Students would benefit from reading this article in preparation for completing a news article assignment.  Geographic context always matters; it might not tell the whole story but it will certainly shape it.   

 

Tags: Geography, GeographyEducation, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples.


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Andrew Shears, PhD's comment, September 9, 2012 12:41 PM
Really good critical reaction to this piece from Derek Gregory: http://geographicalimaginations.com/2012/09/08/geography-strikes-back/
Seth Dixon's comment, December 11, 2012 11:37 AM
Thanks for sharing that article Andy, I'm just seeing it now!
Wyatt Fratnz's curator insight, March 19, 10:05 PM

  This informative article gives us a different insight to politics, claiming that countries action in politics, war, etc. are based upon where they are located. It goes on to describe different examples containing spatial, economic and political conflict. Afterward, it describes what this has to do and how it effects people (and their governments).

 

  This gives us a great insight on how space is afflicted with the territorial dimensions of politics. It relates to why certain nations make the different decisions they do and how it is related to our everyday lives.

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Welcome To The New Middle East

Welcome To The New Middle East | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it
The violent protests at U.S. embassies this week seemed to catch the new Middle East governments flat-footed. So are these attacks an aberration on the rocky road of nation building, or a harbinger of a region moving toward greater chaos?

 

This nicely puts the political instability of North Africa in context to understand the recent attack on U.S. embassies.

 

Tags: MiddleEast, political, states.


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Don Brown Jr's comment, September 18, 2012 6:33 PM
Although change is continuous we must remember that it does not occur instantaneously. The Arab Spring and the removal of many autocratic governments has created in many of these countries a power gap that the new governments are trying to fill among other local competing factions. Before we judge the New Middle East we must take into account that these actions were done by individuals in the response to a video uploaded by an individual. Should the worth of a nation be measured by the acts of a few people? Likewise the anti-Islamic video that went viral stuck at the heart of Middle Eastern beliefs and it should not be surprising that it was not well received by Muslims. Remember the public outcry in the US over the “victory” Mosque in New York? Multiply that feeling by a factor of 10 and we might understand how many Muslims felt about this video.
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Population clock for every country

Population clock for every country | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it
Real time statistics for current population of any country. Real time data on population, births, deaths, net migration and population growth.

 

This site shows various demographic statistics for every country including some based on projections in demographic trends in the given country.  If the current trends hold (which they won't, but that is still an interesting measure), the entire Japanese population will disappear in 1,000 years according to this Global Post article: http://www.globalpost.com/dispatches/news/regions/asia-pacific/japan/population-clock-shows-japan-faces-extinction-1000-years


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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 2014 10:17 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the population growth theme because it utilizes all of the indicators we learned in this class, including CBR, CDR, net migration rates, and population growth rates.

Riley Tuggle's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:51 AM

I believe India has more men than women because sometimes when women can't have a son for their first or second child, the men would beat the women to death, or in some instances women are captured and sold for wives, and they may commit suicide they are so depressed. Also, some pregnant women find out their baby is a girl, they would aport or abandon her because sons are apparently more important and successful because they would stay home and take care of their parents when they are elderly and they would carry on the families name. -rt

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:22 AM

This is fantastic - have a look at various countries and their 'rate' of growth

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Tunisian foreign minister in Italy for migration talks | Morocco World ...

Tunisian foreign minister in Italy for migration talks | Morocco World ... | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it
TUNIS, Sept 13, 2012 (AFP). Tunisia's Foreign Minister Rafik Abdessalem travelled to Rome on Thursday for talks on the problem of illegal migration across the Mediterranean, a week after dozens died when their boat sank ...
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Why Technology Is Key to Overcoming the Language Barrier

Why Technology Is Key to Overcoming the Language Barrier | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it

Language barriers prevent us for completely connecting. But what if the language barrier didn't exist?

 

DB: Presently we are living in a rapidly changing world where the spread of ideas and items are occurring at a rate unprecedented in history. In this globalized and increasingly interconnected world, the variation of languages spoken is drastically decreasing. As some of the most genuine characteristics of a culture are intertwined within its langue, a reduction in spoken languages and increased interaction is threating the duration of some traditional ways of living. Likewise since economics is one of the thriving factors behind globalization, the ability to communicate with your market has become paramount. However technological innovation is currently in the process of making up for the shortage of qualified linguists around the globe. Although possessing a universal portable translation device is currently beyond our capacity, it is likely that such a device similar to what was once believed possible only in science fiction may be readily available within our lifetime. Whether it becomes a public utility or a commensal asset as well as who has access to it remains to be decided. Yet this also brings up an important question of how culture will be affected if the language barrier is overcome through technology? Can geographic cultural diffusion continue to function if everyone can easily understand each other? What happens when worlds lose their cultural significance for the sake of convenience?


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Blake Turnbull's curator insight, March 21, 2013 11:41 PM

A new technology based around the concept of translation that aims to overcome the language barrier. Although the author states that even if they sitting in the same room as a colleague and are both native English speakers, they may still only understand 98% of their intended meaning. So for that reason alone, translation technology will never be perfect, but they believe this is a step in the right direction.

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Woman Stats Project

Woman Stats Project | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it

"The WomanStats Project is the most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of women in the world. The Project facilitates understanding the linkage between the situation of women and the security of nation-states. We comb the extant literature and conduct expert interviews to find qualitative and quantitative information on over 310 indicators of women's status in 174 countries. Our Database expands daily, and access to it is free of charge."

 

With assistance from the Geography Dept. at Brigham Young University, the WomanStats Project provides important data and maps regarding issues of gender, access and equity with a spatial perspective.  


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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 9, 2012 11:11 AM
Def a good tool for women to use if they go on vacation or plan to move. I understand that all cultures are different with their own sent of morals, but to see the same repeated countries with such harsh disregard to women is just unethical. I understand that from my culture this seems extreme, and unnecessary, yet the social norm for them. I just feel with all the movements in history it's sad that these countries have been untouched, and simply push women further into oppression.
Brandon Murphy's comment, July 9, 2012 6:53 PM
I think this just reinforces the factual information that we already know of about how different cultures across the world treat women in all regards/aspects of life.
Don Brown Jr's comment, July 9, 2012 9:51 PM
This information provided from this map reveals much more to the observer than the security of women. From looking at the location of the wealthiest counties in the world, I can make a connection between women’s rights and economic strength, education, birth rates as well as life expectancy in different regions of the globe.
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Geography students hold the key to the world's problems

Geography students hold the key to the world's problems | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it
Geography may have slipped out of the top 10 A-level subjects, but that doesn't change the fact that work done by geographers has global importance, says Michael Palin...

 

Always good to remind ourselves why we teach geography and to remind them why it's important. 


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How China can help Europe get out of debt

How China can help Europe get out of debt | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it
How it can halt the European debt crisis.

 

The economic struggles of one country, in the era of globalization and supranational organizations such as the E.U., have an increasingly wider area of impact with larger ripples in the pond.


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What your state is the worst at – United States of shame

What your state is the worst at – United States of shame | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it

And the United States of Awesome, what any state is best at.  This could lead to some humorous, but also engaging discussion--hopefully without the negative stereotypes.  Thanks Danbury HS! 


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Cam E's curator insight, January 29, 2014 1:46 PM

Many interesting things on this map! I'm not surprised to see that Rhode Island comes in number one in drug use, growing up I always was aware of how easy it was to get through friends of friends, and it is a big part of even the High School culture. I thought it was the same everywhere until I began to venture out. Massachusetts having the worst drivers adds cruel truth to the idea of "Massholes," but I was born there myself and I do love the place, as horrible as it is to drive in there. I've personally found Boston easier to drive in than Providence, but that might be just because I'm one of them and don't know it!

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7 Billion, National Geographic Magazine

See photos from 7 Billion: http://bit.ly/hhYz3m With the worldwide population expected to exceed seven billion in 2011, National Geographic magazine offers a...

 

This video provides excellent material for discussing population growth, space and sustainability.


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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 21, 2013 7:42 PM

The optimistic tone set in this peace was very moving; using the idea that 7 billon people could fit in LA really drove home how massive earth is. When they were showing our population growth it seemed like the graph started to level off. Clearly technology was the reason for the expediential spike and as long as technology can keep up we will create sustainable solutions for everyone in the world.  The ideas are out there they just need to be put into the right hands, 

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 6:01 PM


At the rate we are going we will hit 10 billion in no time because there are people in this world that have more than two kids. The ideal numbers of kid’s people have. There is one show that comes to mind is 19 kids and counting on TLC. They are a family of almost thirty living in one big house. The mother of the bunch is probably in her late 40's and is still having more kids as we speak she is probably pregnant with number 20. They should not have more kids because in no time they will run out of space and have to build a new house that could hold so much people. At the rate they are having kids the world is growing and growing population wise. The world can only hold so much people at a time. One good example is china and being a 3 billion people country and still growing day by day. 10 billion is a lot of people to take care of it will be twice as hard to maintain. There are more children being born than people dyeing. Population growth will affect everyone in regards to food supply and medicine wise.

 

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:03 PM

The increase in global population is definitely a hot button topic in today's world. Many wonder if the planet will be able to really sustain so many new people, and if it can truly sustain our current number of humans. This video does a good job of addressing these problems and presenting how things will likely come to be. Our planet is capable of producing great amounts of food and material the real hurdle comes down to how well nations will cooperate. Unfortunately politics and money seem to be the real snagging point in the distribution of aid and resources to many.  

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What’s your local HDI (human development index)?

What’s your local HDI (human development index)? | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it

"A recently-released online tool enables Californians to see where they stand on a “human development index” – a composite measure of health, knowledge and standard of living developed by the American Human Development Project of the Social Sciences..." 

This is cool.  Instead of aggregating the data at the country level and comparing countries, we can see differences in local levels of human development.  Students see patterns of socio-economic and development vividly, and in an intensely local way tailored to their regional frame of reference.   


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Tracey Sarvis's curator insight, November 9, 2014 8:20 AM

Development and HDI

 

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Which country has the smallest gender gap?

Which country has the smallest gender gap? | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it
How narrow is the gender gap in the United States compared to some other countries? 

 

This article is good for analyzing global cultural, economic and political patterns, especially within a gender unit.


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MANAGING SKILLED ECONOMIC MIGRATION IN EUROPE « Job ...

MANAGING SKILLED ECONOMIC MIGRATION IN EUROPE « Job ... | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it
Particularly in Europe, this situation has led to the replacement of post-war laissez-faire approaches to labour migration with tighter policies in a number of countries, influencing also the entry conditions of high-skilled migrants ...
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How Big a Backyard Would You Need to Live Off the Land?

How Big a Backyard Would You Need to Live Off the Land? | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it

Tags: infographic, food, agriculture, sustainability, urban, urban ecology, locavore, land use, unit 5 agriculture, unit 7 cities.


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Crissy Borton's comment, September 11, 2012 8:36 PM
Looking at purchasing a house in the next year or so and this is one thing we have been looking at. Although we don't want to raise our own meat we would like to grow everything else we eat.
Courtney Holbert's curator insight, February 3, 2013 10:44 PM

Good visual representation of what it would take to be self sufficient.

Chris Scott's curator insight, July 14, 2013 9:51 AM

If you need a backyard that is about 2 acres to live off the land imagine how big of a backyard you would need if you had a family of 8.

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The global debt clock

The global debt clock | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it
Authoritative weekly newspaper focusing on international politics and business news and opinion.

 

Tags: Economic, currency, visualization.


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Guillaume Decugis's comment, September 6, 2012 3:06 PM
Remember when we used to talk about the 3rd-world debt being a problem? (Back when the term 3rd world was actually not politically incorrect...) Well, this map clearly shows, debt is a 1st-world problem now...

Awesome map Seth! Thanks for sharing.
Investors Europe Stock Brokers's curator insight, September 2, 2014 1:42 AM

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Patient Migration Suggests Big Changes Await Rural Hospitals

Patient Migration Suggests Big Changes Await Rural Hospitals | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it
Nearly half of Tennesseans living in rural areas drive past the hospitals closest to their homes to look for care in more urban settings, even when (Patient Migration Suggests Big Changes Await Rural Hospitals: Nearly half of Tennesseans living in...
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100 People: A World Portrait

100 People: A World Portrait | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it

This is the truly global project that asks the children of the world to introduce us to the people of the world.  We've seen videos and resources that ask the question, "if there were only 100 people in the world, what would it look like?"  This takes that idea of making demographic statistics more meaningful one step further by asking student in schools for around the world to nominate some "representative people" and share their stories.  The site houses videos, galleries from each continent and analyze themes that all societies must deal with.  This site that looks at the people and places on out planet to promote greater appreciation of cultural diversity and understanding is a great find. 

 

Tags: Worldwide, statistics, K12, education, comparison.


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Canberra Girls Grammar GSSF's curator insight, September 1, 2013 10:43 PM

Year 7 Liveability Unit 2

savvy's curator insight, September 3, 2014 12:57 PM

This just makes me realize how the world would be if we only had 100 people rather than the billions we have now.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, February 26, 7:24 AM

A face das crianças no mundo