AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013
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Bridges For Animals - Wildlife Overpasses

Bridges For Animals - Wildlife Overpasses | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it

Our modern society depends on greater connectivity between places.  Regionalized economies, politics and transportation networks are increasingly integrated with far-flung places now more than ever before.  Our biosphere and natural environments are exceptions to this pattern.  Wilderness areas are 'islands' in an ocean of human controlled environments.   We create transportation linkages that unite people economies and cities, but separate herds from there extended habitat. 

 

We've all seen road kill on major highways.  Species like deer, elk, and grizzly bears and other large-bodied animals need a wide range for numerous ecological reasons.  These bridges are an attempt to ameliorate some of the problems that our roads pose for the non-human species that still call Earth home.  From a purely economic standpoint, many argue that these bridges save society money given the accidents and property damage that can be avoided. 

 

Tags: biogeography, transportation, environment, land use, sustainability, environment adapt.


Via Seth Dixon
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Carly Schaus's comment, October 3, 2013 9:48 PM
I think this would be a great idea! it would keep the animals, nature and people safe. They have protection from motor vehicles where they crash on.
Courtney Gritman's comment, October 4, 2013 3:22 PM
I think this would be a wonderful solution from innocent animals from being killed and thousands of car accidents being prevented.
Jerod Garland's comment, October 15, 2013 8:55 PM
This is very interesting! Good scoop!
Rescooped by Laura Parsons from Geography Education
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The Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans Gives New Meaning to ‘Urban Growth’

The Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans Gives New Meaning to ‘Urban Growth’ | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it
Since Katrina, the cartoonish pace of vegetation growth in the Lower Ninth Ward of New Orleans resembles something out of a Chia Pet commercial.

 

The ecosystem is reclaiming parts of New Orleans that have been physically or economically abandoned.  This is part elevation, climate and ecosystem; but it is also about urban land uses, disinvestment and socioeconomics.

 

Tags: urban ecology, environment, ecology, urban, unit 7 cities, disasters, land use. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Kayla, Sean, and Max's curator insight, February 26, 2015 1:21 PM

Max

Due to all the death and destruction brought upon New Orleans by hurricane Katrina, areas like the lower ninth ward have been partially abandoned and left unmaintained. What was once neat, urban blocks has now become a jungle. Along with the vegetation becoming a nuisance, it has also brought along with it pests such as possums, coyotes, and even alligators. The vacant lots have also become places criminals sometimes use for murder/rape, making the neighborhood much more dangerous.