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Roots of the Mali Crisis

January 19, 2013—The West African nation of Mali is making headlines after a wave of French military actions on Islamic extremist groups now controlling the northern part of the country. National Geographic Senior Writer Peter Gwin has...

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Araceli Vilarrasa Cunillé's curator insight, February 6, 2013 6:37 AM

La crisi propera no es deixa fer prou atenció als canvis geopolítics a l' Africa.

Emma Lafleur's curator insight, March 29, 2013 3:32 PM

   This video clip that is great for learning not only about the situation in Mali, but how history leads to the events of today and how much one country can affect another country.

   When Europe colonized  Africa they created borders that separated groups of people that should have stayed together, and they put different ethnic groups together that should have been separated. With this alone comes great conflict because ethnic groups and neighboring tribes that have had conflicts for years now have to operate under the same government somehow and no one is ever really happy so conflicts arise.

    Also, the Arab Spring broke out which brought on all these new ideas and opportunities for the people to revolt and change their country, and some of the people left Libya after the fall of Gadaffi and went to Mali bringing their weapons and anger with them. All of these events led to the Mali crisis today, and it is interesting to see how much one country affects another country and as a history major I am greatly interested in how the history of the country brings about the events of today.

Al Picozzi's comment, July 18, 2013 12:15 PM
The borders were randomly drawn without taking culture, language, beliefs of the native populations etc into account. However drawing borders along ethnic lines didn't work in Europe after WWI. Alot of ethnic minorities were in countires that did not feel welcome. That was one reason for WWII
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MapMaker-National Geographic Education

MapMaker-National Geographic Education | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it
Customize one-page maps and download, email, print, or share!

 

Want to make a custom map don't have a cartographic background or access to GIS software?  This online program will give you what you need. 


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NatGeo on Instagram

NatGeo on Instagram | AP Human Geography, WHS 2012-2013 | Scoop.it

I'm not a photographer, so Instagram isn't one on of my preferred social media platforms.  However, since National Geographic is world renowned for their images, this is a perfect outlet to share more images that wouldn't fit into their articles or other collections.  According to their Social Media expert, this foggy image of NYC is their most viewed image on Instagram. 


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7 Billion, National Geographic Magazine

See photos from 7 Billion: http://bit.ly/hhYz3m With the worldwide population expected to exceed seven billion in 2011, National Geographic magazine offers a...

 

This video provides excellent material for discussing population growth, space and sustainability.


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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:03 PM

The increase in global population is definitely a hot button topic in today's world. Many wonder if the planet will be able to really sustain so many new people, and if it can truly sustain our current number of humans. This video does a good job of addressing these problems and presenting how things will likely come to be. Our planet is capable of producing great amounts of food and material the real hurdle comes down to how well nations will cooperate. Unfortunately politics and money seem to be the real snagging point in the distribution of aid and resources to many.  

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 4:25 PM

The rapid growth occurring is staggering.  I believe we do need to start thinking about the future in generations.  Where will we be in 50-100 years and where do we need to be.  So basically you need to start thinking about your childrens' childrens' future.  We need to make changes to sustain the increase in population.  

Erin McLeod's curator insight, August 6, 10:55 PM

Geography - Human Population in senior school