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US Population Predictions | Visual.ly

US Population Predictions | Visual.ly | AP Human Geography Topics | Scoop.it
How the US population will be dominated by ageing whites and youthful hispanics by 2050...

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Where Does the South Begin?

Where Does the South Begin? | AP Human Geography Topics | Scoop.it
Roads? Religion? Accent? Food? Which factor dictates where the North ends?

 

This is a great intellectual expercise to help student think about regions and how we define them.  The article can help also inform some of their thinking since one of the main problems for students in drawing regional boundaries is a lack of place-based knowledge.   

 

Tags: regions, USA.


Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:49 PM

Borders... the first thing I think of was a giant bookstore near my hometown... it now ceases to exist, having been replaced by Barnes and Nobel...  As for the political organization of space, I could apply this situation and laugh.  Borders will cease to be, and they will be called after people's last names!  I think this has already happened, when people unite together in countries such as the USA- although borders are specific, the general federal laws and many policies still apply in all states... generally. And people's names are often the namesakes of places.  I don't like the idea of borders, though, it seems like a bunch of warmongers trying to get ahead in a world where they can't truly cheat death, so they cheat other people of land that may have been decreed in ancient documents as property of their ancestors, or even in accordance with the righteousness of the universe and what should be alloted to whom.  Ownership is a concept of denial, because no one can truly own anything, not even our bodies, which contain trillions of infinite universes the size of the large one around us that we commonly refer to.  Borders are relative, and will likely become recognized as obsolete.  I know this was abstract, but it's my thoughts on the topic.

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Where Does the South Begin?

Where Does the South Begin? | AP Human Geography Topics | Scoop.it
Roads? Religion? Accent? Food? Which factor dictates where the North ends?

 

This is a great intellectual expercise to help student think about regions and how we define them.  The article can help also inform some of their thinking since one of the main problems for students in drawing regional boundaries is a lack of place-based knowledge.   

 

Tags: regions, USA.


Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:49 PM

Borders... the first thing I think of was a giant bookstore near my hometown... it now ceases to exist, having been replaced by Barnes and Nobel...  As for the political organization of space, I could apply this situation and laugh.  Borders will cease to be, and they will be called after people's last names!  I think this has already happened, when people unite together in countries such as the USA- although borders are specific, the general federal laws and many policies still apply in all states... generally. And people's names are often the namesakes of places.  I don't like the idea of borders, though, it seems like a bunch of warmongers trying to get ahead in a world where they can't truly cheat death, so they cheat other people of land that may have been decreed in ancient documents as property of their ancestors, or even in accordance with the righteousness of the universe and what should be alloted to whom.  Ownership is a concept of denial, because no one can truly own anything, not even our bodies, which contain trillions of infinite universes the size of the large one around us that we commonly refer to.  Borders are relative, and will likely become recognized as obsolete.  I know this was abstract, but it's my thoughts on the topic.

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English Pronunciation

English Pronunciation | AP Human Geography Topics | Scoop.it

"If you can pronounce correctly every word in this poem, you will be speaking English better than 90% of the native English speakers in the world.

After trying the verses, a Frenchman said he’d prefer six months of hard labour to reading six lines aloud."

 

This is the darndest poem and shows how truly complex English pronounciation really is (while also showing how spatially contingent the very idea of 'correct pronunciation' actually can be). 


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The Pop vs. Soda Page

The Pop vs. Soda Page | AP Human Geography Topics | Scoop.it
A page that plots the geographic distribution of the terms "pop" and "soda" when used to describe carbonated beverages...

 

This is an old classic that is going viral on Facebook right now, so I thought it would be time to link you to the original.  This map isn't just cool, but a great portal to a discussion on regions, diffusion and cultural identity.  This is a modern 'shibboleth' for the United States, a way to show where you are from to some extent.  What are other 'shibboleths' that make your region distinct?  


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cookiesrgreat's comment, February 2, 2012 5:23 PM
Other could mean "cola" or "drink"
Elizabeth Allen's comment, November 16, 2012 5:05 PM
Such a neat map that certainly illustrates the differences between US states. Seeing this map and the reasons for the variation in name makes sense. Of course soda is called "Coke" in the south. Georgia is the home of the Coke Cola Factory.
Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 9, 11:44 PM

Unit 1

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Soda vs. Pop with Twitter

Soda vs. Pop with Twitter | AP Human Geography Topics | Scoop.it
One of the great things about Twitter is that it’s a global conversation anyone can join anytime. Eavesdropping on the world, what what!

 

While many educators have been using http://popvssoda.com/ to show the linguistic regions in the United States, this is a similar map, with the added social media component.  To map out these regions, the cartographer used the word choice on geo-tagged tweets as the data source.  For another twitter, map, the following link shows which regions are most actively engaged on Twitter: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/07/06/top-countries-on-twitter_n_1653915.html

What do these regions show us?  What types of regions are these?


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Chris W's comment, August 27, 2012 11:02 AM
This is a really cool use of twitter! I use the term soda, which most of the northeast uses as well.
Courtney Burns's curator insight, September 14, 2013 10:35 PM
Twitter is something that is becoming widely used, and is something I usually check everyday. I never really thought of twitter beyond advertising and communicating. It is amazing the kind of data that can be extracted from peoples tweets. In the soda vs. pop argument I would say soda which makes sense since the data shows that people in the Northeast refer to it as soda. Twitter is so current that you can actually get some current and accurate data just from reading the hash tags in peoples tweets. It's amazing that such information can be extracted from all around the world.
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Life in Chechnya

Life in Chechnya | AP Human Geography Topics | Scoop.it
Photojournalist Diana Markosian spent the last year and half covering Russia's volatile North Caucasus region.

 

These 33 photos are arranged to tell the cultural story of life in Chechnya, especially the life of young women coming of age in the aftermath of the war.  As the architecture of this mosque suggests, the influence of traditional Islamic values and Russian political authority have greatly shaped the lives of the Chechen people.


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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 18, 3:24 PM

These pictures show many examples to how life in Chechnya for women is very different for women in the United States. We can see that these woman take part in similar day to day activities, but in very different ways. This is why their lives overall are much different than ours.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 15, 10:49 PM

The images I was able to see were moving. The image that stands out most were the children in gym class. Young men were able to wear gym like clothing and the girls needed to be covered head to toe wearing dresses.Powerful.I was able to see only a few and the rest seemed to be lightened to the point where you could not see them anymore. The words also seemed to be blocked out. =(

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 12:28 PM

These photos show the culture of Chechnya. I found them very effective at mixing the environmental and cultural aspects of the area in these pictures. The one where two young people are on a date in a barren snow covered park sitting on opposites sides of the bench because close physical contact is forbidden before marriage. Although the school gym shows how women have to be dressed modestly even when they are exercising. 

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The 10 Most and Least Developed Countries | PBS NewsHour | Nov. 2, 2011

The 10 Most and Least Developed Countries | PBS NewsHour | Nov. 2, 2011 | AP Human Geography Topics | Scoop.it
The 2011 Human Development Report ranked 187 countries according to income, education and health. We showcase the top five and bottom five on the list.

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World Refugee Day: UNHCR report finds 80 per cent of world's refugees in developing countries

World Refugee Day: UNHCR report finds 80 per cent of world's refugees in developing countries | AP Human Geography Topics | Scoop.it
The report reveals imbalance in international support for the world's forcibly displaced. Some of the poorest countries host huge refugee populations.

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Two weeks with the Hutterites

Two weeks with the Hutterites | AP Human Geography Topics | Scoop.it

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Mapping US ethnicity

Mapping US ethnicity | AP Human Geography Topics | Scoop.it
A look at where US immigrants have originated from in the past, and how these patterns could change in the future.

Via Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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World Refugee Day: UNHCR report finds 80 per cent of world's refugees in developing countries

World Refugee Day: UNHCR report finds 80 per cent of world's refugees in developing countries | AP Human Geography Topics | Scoop.it
The report reveals imbalance in international support for the world's forcibly displaced. Some of the poorest countries host huge refugee populations.

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Photos that bear witness to modern slavery

TED Talks For the past two years, photographer Lisa Kristine has traveled the world, documenting the unbearably harsh realities of modern-day slavery.

 

This is a chilling glimpse into the worst and darkest side of the economic systems of geography and labor in the world. It is estimated that there are more than 25 million people who today live in state that can be described as modern-day slavery. We should not discuss slavery only in the past tense, and yet it conflicts with how most people conceptualize the world today.

 

Questions to Ponder: How can this even be happening in the 21st century? What geographic and economic forces lead to these situations portrayed in this TED talk? What realistically could be done to lessen the amount of slavery in the world today?

 

Tags: TED, labor, economic, class, poverty, South Asia, Africa, video.


Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Kyle Toner's comment, November 6, 2012 12:17 PM
This video truly opened eyes into the conflict of modern day slavery. I had no idea just how prevalent, global and horrible this situation is.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 6, 2013 10:51 AM

This is a chilling glimpse into the worst and darkest side of the economic systems of geography and labor in the world. It is estimated that there are more than 25 million people who today live in state that can be described as modern-day slavery. We should not discuss slavery only in the past tense, and yet it conflicts with how most people conceptualize the world today.


Questions to Ponder: How can this even be happening in the 21st century? What geographic and economic forces lead to these situations portrayed in this TED talk? What realistically could be done to lessen the amount of slavery in the world today?


Tags: TED, labor, economic, class, poverty, South Asia, Africa, video.

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82 iconic world landmarks to visit

82 iconic world landmarks to visit | AP Human Geography Topics | Scoop.it
Some buildings and features are so well known they have become icons of place.

 

This is a great collection of important world landmarks including the pictured Potala Palace in the Tibetan city of Lhasa.  Who wouldn't like to see some of these places?   

 

Tags: geo-inspiration, tourism, images.


Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Sophia Schroeder's comment, September 1, 2013 8:02 PM
All of these landmarks are beautiful. It's very interesting to see how much culture, especially religion, has shaped these "must see places." Also, I felt like I was traveling through time and got to examine the feats of new architectural eras, though some would debate that architectural works from the past are more outstanding strictly by the means in which they built these masterpieces. It needs to be said (to add to the wonderment of these places) that most of these monuments are built in places where the overall economic status is low; to see things like temples and churches of such great magnitude and beauty built with such craftsmanship, dedication, and money (even though it is scarce) shows how much they rely on their faith. I was also disappointed to see that the two monuments displayed for America, the Lincoln Memorial and the St. Louis Arch, were, in my opinion, not the best picks. Compared to the other landmarks ours feel so mundane, so void of history and culture (maybe, that's because I have grown up seeing them all my life and their meaning and awe has deteriorated to me.) I guess this can be attributed, in part, to the fact that our country is newer and has not yet grown enough to have the rich history including the trials and tribulations in which other countries have had which makes their culture more fascinating and intriguing to me.
Mary Rack's comment, September 2, 2013 12:49 AM
Sophia, Thanks for your very fine comment! I agree with you entirely, and especially about the Lincoln Memorial and St Louis Arch. Better choices might be the Grand Canyon, the Giant Sequoia trees in California, the National Cathedral in DC, or even Mt Rushmore? And some of the ancient cliff dwellings in the Southwest are amazing. Too bad they did not consult us.
Mary Rack's comment, September 2, 2013 12:51 AM
PS ... or the Hoover Dam?
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Where Does the South Begin?

Where Does the South Begin? | AP Human Geography Topics | Scoop.it
Roads? Religion? Accent? Food? Which factor dictates where the North ends?

 

This is a great intellectual expercise to help student think about regions and how we define them.  The article can help also inform some of their thinking since one of the main problems for students in drawing regional boundaries is a lack of place-based knowledge.   

 

Tags: regions, USA.


Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:49 PM

Borders... the first thing I think of was a giant bookstore near my hometown... it now ceases to exist, having been replaced by Barnes and Nobel...  As for the political organization of space, I could apply this situation and laugh.  Borders will cease to be, and they will be called after people's last names!  I think this has already happened, when people unite together in countries such as the USA- although borders are specific, the general federal laws and many policies still apply in all states... generally. And people's names are often the namesakes of places.  I don't like the idea of borders, though, it seems like a bunch of warmongers trying to get ahead in a world where they can't truly cheat death, so they cheat other people of land that may have been decreed in ancient documents as property of their ancestors, or even in accordance with the righteousness of the universe and what should be alloted to whom.  Ownership is a concept of denial, because no one can truly own anything, not even our bodies, which contain trillions of infinite universes the size of the large one around us that we commonly refer to.  Borders are relative, and will likely become recognized as obsolete.  I know this was abstract, but it's my thoughts on the topic.

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Understanding a Rhode Island Accent

Mark Colozzi of Ocean State Follies translates Rhode Islandese. I recorded most of Charlie Hall's Ocean State Follies performance at Rhode Island College (Oc...

 

This provides a humorous look at a regionally distinct accent and way of speaking from the city I live in, Cranston, RI. This might be tough to follow for some non-Rhode Islanders since many local places, stores and institutions referenced as deeply local. 

 

(As a side note, this version was performed on my college campus and I'm actually in the background of the video since I was running the book sale as a fundraiser for the Shinn Study Abroad Committee. At the 2:30 mark, I'm the guy in the green shirt behind the Cranston sign)


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Em Marin's comment, February 2, 2012 5:27 PM
he used to teach in my highschool
Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 29, 3:34 PM

This funny video highlights how phonetically different words are in different dialects.  This is focused on the sound of the Rhode Island accent and it was interesting to see how the words were spelled when written phonetically.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, September 25, 7:48 PM

Things only Rhode Islander's would say....... or understand.I have never seen this routine in it's entirety but it is actually quite funny.

P.S.D.S.( pierced ears) hilarious we all say these words or know someone who does.I think it's always fun when we can poke fun at ourselves. I hope the Ocean State Follies makes a return trip to Rhode Island College.

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Organic Agriculture's Bitter Taste Or Is Organic Agriculture "Affluent ... - Forbes

Organic Agriculture's Bitter Taste Or Is Organic Agriculture "Affluent ... - Forbes | AP Human Geography Topics | Scoop.it
ForbesOrganic Agriculture's Bitter Taste Or Is Organic Agriculture "Affluent ...ForbesBy Henry I. Miller and Richard Cornett. As can be seen from the popularity of rip-off artists like Whole Foods markets, organic foods are popular.
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PBS documentary on religion to feature Akron Secular Student Alliance.

PBS documentary on religion to feature Akron Secular Student Alliance. | AP Human Geography Topics | Scoop.it
JT Eberhard on AkronSSA: http://t.co/GXyuu6Ci...
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Political Geography Now: Somalia: The Retreat of Al Shabaab

Political Geography Now: Somalia: The Retreat of Al Shabaab | AP Human Geography Topics | Scoop.it
Map of the stages of Kenyan, Ethiopian, and Somali advances against Islamist militants Al Shabaab, plus guide to major players and timeline of key events.

Via Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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What’s the language of the future?

What’s the language of the future? | AP Human Geography Topics | Scoop.it
As English takes over the world, it's splintering and changing -- and soon, we may not recognize it at all...

Via Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Looking Back on the Limits of Growth

Looking Back on the Limits of Growth | AP Human Geography Topics | Scoop.it
Forty years after the release of the groundbreaking study, were the concerns about overpopulation and the environment correct?

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PSY - GANGNAM STYLE (강남스타일) M/V

PSY - Gangnam Style (강남스타일) ▶ NOW available on iTunes: Smarturl.it ▶ Official PSY Online Store US & International : psy.shop.bravadousa.com ▶ About PSY from YG Ent.: smarturl.it ▶ PSY's Products on eBay: stores.ebay.com ▶ YG-eShop: www.ygeshop.com...
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