AP Human Geography JCHS
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Enclaves

Enclaves | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it
A website that examines the geographical enclaves of the world

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Alejandro Restrepo's comment, February 13, 2013 6:18 PM
Very interesting!
Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, February 14, 2013 7:32 AM
Mondialisation et frontières... et sur cette carte mon imminente destination de vacances: l'enclave omanaise de Musandam.
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 14, 2013 4:46 PM

Enclaves of the world HUGGERS....review!

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Changing Face of the US/Mexico Border

Changing Face of the US/Mexico Border | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it

This lesson plan was specifically designed with Arizona examples and aligned to the Arizona state standards, but it be easily adapted.  I saw a presentation based on this lesson at the NCGE conference as was incredibly impressed.  Also, you'll note that like this one, there are many other lesson plans freely available on the Arizona Geographic Alliance website.  


Tags: K12, borders, political, landscape, migration, unit 4 political.


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oyndrila's comment, October 14, 2012 11:40 AM
I found very useful resources on the website. Thank you for sharing it.
Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 2014 3:25 PM

This is an important lesson, especially for those who actually live in Arizona/Mexico and have seen the border itself. Learning about the Arizona/Mexican border is important and shouldn't be left solely to teaching it only in those areas. The maps included in the lesson plan are efficient and could be used in the high school setting.

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On Israel's system of segregated roads in the occupied Palestinian territories

On Israel's system of segregated roads in the occupied Palestinian territories | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it

Tags: MiddleEast, territoriality, transportation, borders, conflict, governance, political, unit 4 political. 


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Cam E's curator insight, March 4, 2014 11:32 AM

A relatively grim reminder that even things as clear-cut as road systems can be inherently political. This system forces segregation by the law of which roads can be driven on, but it's a good jumping point to remember that even the placement of roads can exclude or include communities. I'm reminded of the proposed idea for a NAFTA superhighway running through Mexico, Canada, and the US. One of the criticisms was that the highway would not provide exits for anywhere but major economics centers, effectively cutting off small towns from the rest of the area.

Zach & Wafeeq's curator insight, November 4, 2014 5:04 PM

Area/Geography: This is a diagram of what Israel is like for Palestinians and Israelis. It shows extremely restricted access for Palestinians. Whereas Israelis have all of the roads. This diagram fairly falls under the Area/Geography category because of the fact of how the Israeli government is manipulating the area/geography of the land of Israel to suit their best interest. 

Jacqueline Garcia pd1's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:33 PM

Here one can see the political territoriality among Israel. For example in this article webpage we saw that people with Palestinian license plates can not drive on Israeli roads. This is one of the many instances where people are segregated according to their beliefs. 

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Infographic: Palestinian homes demolished

Infographic: Palestinian homes demolished | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it
Report by an Israeli non-governmental organisation says 2011 was a record year for Palestinian displacement.

 

This infographic comes from the group http://visualizingpalestine.org  This corresponds with the UN's recent statement that Gaza 'will not be liveable by 2020' given Israeli policies as reported by the BBC: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-19391809


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Nic Hardisty's comment, September 4, 2012 12:16 PM
What a powerful infographic. To think that the international community (in large part) has idly watched 160,000 Palestinians become homeless, with little more than a few harsh words, is staggering. While these displacement policies are not exclusive to Israel, Israel does stand as the most public modern example of this. This problem transcends race, ethnicity, culture, or religion- it is simply one group dominating and subjugating another, and these actions should be recognized and condemned by global community.
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Gerrymandering 101

This video is a good primer to show before the ReDistricting Game (http://www.scoop.it/t/geography-education/p/2214122954/the-redistricting-game ).


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Delainee Alysse Bushey's curator insight, April 27, 5:00 PM
This video relates to what we are talking about in class, political geography, because it talks about gerrymandering. Gerrymandering deals with political geography because the people who make the district lines are politicians and district lines deals with geography. My opinion on this is that people use redistricting for their own good, so it can benefit them in the long run.
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The British have invaded 9 out of 10 countries

The British have invaded 9 out of 10 countries | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it
Britain has invaded all but 22 countries in the world in its long and colourful history, new research has found.


This is a great map to show the historical impact of colonialism on the world map.  The map is based on the work in the new book All the Countries We've Ever Invaded: And the Few We Never Got Round To.   


Tags: book reviews, colonialism, war, historical, UK. 


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:33 PM

The British have done this in reality, in the physical world, in space and time... but perhaps the Chinese have done this in our minds!  Everything our country trades for has parts made in China.  We simply can't live without these things that may be invented in the US, and designed in the US, but assembled in China.... China has a name for itself, and they're playing a game of Monopoly.  They have hotels on Board walk and Park place, and they're eating us alive... I've conferred with politicians, who say that they're on the verge of turning their hidden empire into a physical one, and going from simple monetary domination to war.  They outnumber the US, and have better technology, and evidently more skill and products.  Not much to say about that, but if they learn from the mistakes of the British, the Chinese could really create a truly elite empire that could outlast any other in human history...  But really, if they include American/Chinese cuisine in their menu, I'm sold at General Tao's chicken... Go China! 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 2014 8:36 PM

This map illustrates just how wide-reaching the British Empire was throughout its history. Though the map cheats a little by including the activities of sanctioned pirates and minor invasions, almost the whole world excepting several very small nations and some difficult to reach inland ones.

 

The most surprising was Sweden considering the proximity and the frequent viking invasions on the British isles which were apparently never reciprocated.

 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 10:26 AM

The British have had a powerful and colorful history. The British built an empire that has been unmatched in the history of human civilization. At its height, the sun never truly set on its empire. The impact the British Empire had on the globe is astounding. Almost every country in the world has some form of British heritage and influence. The influence has  had both positive and negative attributes. The British Empire spread both knowledge and Slavery to the rest of the globe. The world can never truly escape its British past.

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The Archipelago of Eastern Palestine

The Archipelago of Eastern Palestine | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it

The shape of a state can greatly impact the political cohesion of a country as well as it's economic viability.  While this is obviously a fictitious map, it draws our attention to the logistic difficulties that confront Palestine with the Israelis controlling crucial transportation access points and corridors.   


Questions to Ponder:  How is this a 'persuasive map?' What are some of the geographic impacts of this fragmentation on Palestine? For Israel?

 

Tags: cartography, MiddleEast, political, states, territoriality, unit 4 political.


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Melissa Burr's comment, October 10, 2012 10:13 AM
This map is persuasive because it does not show the usual Palestine. This map is fragmented and the geographic impacts it shows are the routes taken in at leisure for maritime activity and also shows the urban and popluated areas in the past and how how the sraelites impact those areas.
Matthew Jones's comment, October 10, 2012 10:16 AM
The reason this is a persuasive map in my opinion is that this map does a very good job of allowing the reader to understand the focus in which it intends to present. information key which it offers is crucial to the map b/ it help the reader better understand and analyze this map in its entirety. as far As the second question unfortunately I am not very knowledgeable as far as the impact his map as on palestiine or isreal.
Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 10, 2012 11:24 AM
This map is unique and not typical. The way that Palestine's land is severed and each transportation access point is clearly shown and highlighted, makes this map's data very persuasive and impactful. This map examines the Israelis' control of the land.
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The Geography of the 47%

The Geography of the 47% | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it
The states with the highest share of tax non-payers may actually contain the very conservative votes that Romney needs.
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The ReDistricting Game

The ReDistricting Game | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it

This is an interactive way to teach the importance of the redistricting process.  Mapmakers (and geography) are crucial to the process.  This game shows students how the process can be manipulated and if you understand local demographics and voting patterns, subtle shifts in the district borders can swing elections.  This is a great way to teaching gerrymandering and how political cartography can be.     


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Ressources pour les cours d'anglais's curator insight, February 23, 2014 9:02 AM

J'ai regardé la vidéo de présentation et j'ai eu envie de jouer à ce jeu ! J'ai aimé le graphisme, la musique et la voix du narrateur. J'ai eu envie de continuer et je pense que mes élèves auraient eu également envie d'aller plus loin. Il ne me reste donc plus qu'à le tester !

Alex Rodgers's curator insight, April 22, 1:16 AM
This a great tool to connect to political geography. Interactive learning in my opinion is one of the best ways to learn. This allows for us to better understanding political cartography in a way that is both fun and helpful.
Austin Thompson's curator insight, April 27, 5:33 PM
This game is all about gerrymandering in Political Geography and the objective is to set boundaries for each district so that each has a similar population. This game really shows how difficult gerrymandering is and the process of getting the boundaries accepted.  
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Map of America’s Hispanic population

Map of America’s Hispanic population | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it
In the race to the White House, no ethnic group is more prized than Hispanics. President Obama ended deportations for some young undocumented immigrants, and the Romney campaign is vetting Sen.

 

This interactive map feature combines to interesting variables (at the county level): the percentage of the total population that is Hispanic, and the 2008 presidential election.  Analyze your local area and a few counties as well.  What connection exists between the two variables?  How come?  What are some exceptions to these general patterns?


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