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World Cities Quiz

World Cities Quiz | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it
Try out some geography trivia in our World Cities Quiz: a great geography quiz that tests your knowledge of some of the major cities of the word!

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Topography of Religion

Topography of Religion | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it

"The Pew survey sorts people into major groupings--Christians; other religions, including Jewish and Muslim; and 'unaffiliated,' which includes atheist, agnostic and 'nothing in particular.'  Roll your cursor over the map to see how faiths and traditions break down by state."


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Tom Franta's curator insight, August 25, 12:51 PM

Interactive map showing religion by state

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 3:27 PM

APHG-Unit 1

CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 7:09 PM

Awesome interactive map showing the relative religious composition of states.

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European History Interactive Map

European History Interactive Map | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, August 10, 2013 7:51 PM

So many uses!

Lola Jennings- Edquist's curator insight, August 12, 2013 3:56 AM

What an awesome map! A great resource for teaching kids history- and making it simple to understand, as well as interactive. Can be used in conjunction with the 'Protest Sites' map I scooped above; in a unit on protests and change around the world. 

 

I think it links to most areas of Humanities, which is cool. I showed it to some of the kids from placement and they loved it! 

Al Picozzi's curator insight, August 13, 2013 8:28 PM

Great Quick tool to use and very informative.

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Climate Change Infographic

Climate Change Infographic | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it

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Ignacio Conejo Moreno's curator insight, March 3, 2013 6:52 AM

Chungo futuro se nos presenta, si no cambiamos nuestros hábitos!

Emily Ross Cook's curator insight, March 4, 2013 8:44 AM

Humans must change their ways - what are some real life recommendations for changing?

mrjacquot's curator insight, March 6, 2013 8:48 PM

For all the doubters...

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Enclaves

Enclaves | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it
A website that examines the geographical enclaves of the world

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Alejandro Restrepo's comment, February 13, 2013 6:18 PM
Very interesting!
Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, February 14, 2013 7:32 AM
Mondialisation et frontières... et sur cette carte mon imminente destination de vacances: l'enclave omanaise de Musandam.
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 14, 2013 4:46 PM

Enclaves of the world HUGGERS....review!

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The Top Ten Places to Visit in South America

The Top Ten Places to Visit in South America | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it
South America is a land of natural exotic beauty that will leave you speechless, a land of mystery and great historic importance. If you make a trip to the southern hemisphere, be sure to include these precious gems.

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 28, 10:41 PM

This top ten list highlights some amazing sights in South America. There are several locations with fantastic geographic features including: towering mountain ranges, volcanoes with hot springs, fantastic beaches, ancient hidden cities, unbelievable waterfalls, incredible metropolises, and of course the Amazon Jungle with its millions of animal species.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 28, 2:03 PM

Attractions like these are what tourists go in search of. If you want to travel to beautiful places full of natural landscapes, South America is the place to go. The ruins that the water flows over gives it a special and magical touch. 

James Hobson's curator insight, September 29, 10:01 PM

(South America topic 2)

Seeing this list of top-rated South American destination gives me the 'travel-bug' just looking at it! What I first noticed is that each of these locations is of a very unique geography. For example, not all locations are in the Andes Mountains or the Amazon basin; rather, they are spread out across the continent. Rural and urban; tropical and cold; modern and ancient - Great contrasts such as these are what I believe make a place such as South America a destination that is guaranteed to have something for everyone.

(Personally, I can see myself spending time at the animal rescue center, some of the innumerable ruins, and snapping photos at natural vistas. Less than 3 months ago I took a family vacation to the American Southwest which focused around those same 3 themes.)

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Creating American Borders

30-second animation of the changes in U.S. historical county boundaries, 1629 - 2000. Historical state and territorial boundaries are also displayed from 178...

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Emma Lafleur's curator insight, January 29, 2013 6:53 PM

I am interested in US History and watching the creation of the boundaries with the year that they were created gives a lot of insight into the people and population of that time. Also the rate of change in size from year to year gives insight into the economic and political status of the country at that time. This is a great clip to watch even if just to see how much the country has physically changed over time.

Jesse Olsen's comment, March 16, 2013 1:04 PM
Whooooaaaaaaa!!!!
Betty Klug's curator insight, April 27, 2013 3:50 PM

I love animation maps.  Great for getting students interested in learning.

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Canada: As immigration booms, ethnic enclaves swell and segregate

Canada: As immigration booms, ethnic enclaves swell and segregate | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it
More than 600 newcomers per day have arrived in Canada since 2006, and many of them have settled in neighbourhoods like Richmond, B.C.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 12, 2013 9:15 PM

It is amazing that over 600 people come into Canada a day and settle into areas that used to be quite little farming land. These areas are now home to North Americas second largest Asian communities. Canada now has 260 ethnic enclave neighborhoods and they are an important part of Canadas landscape. They are mostly moving into the suburbs where land is cheaper and in my opinion I think they are moving there for job and because they concider it safer. They are also closing down the business of the families that have been their forever and cant compete like the greek families.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 24, 1:15 PM

This article contains details about the Canadian immigrant population boom, mostly from east Asia, which began in the 90's. Unsurprisingly, many of these immigrants settle into communities with others whom share their culture. These Canadian ethnic enclaves differ from those in the US because most immigrants are choosing suburban areas (where the cost of living is lower) rather than being relegated to an urban "ethnictown." However, these enclaves are not entirely a product of economic equality as the average earnings for a recent immigrant are only 61% of a Canadian-born worker, limiting their ability to move elsewhere.

 

Conversely, the immigrant communities which become economically successful are seeing many of their sons and daughters move away to the city or other suburbs as they are more fully integrated into the Canadian culture and if there is no influx of new immigrants into these enclaves they begin to die out. This seems to indicate that long-standing ethnic enclaves are at least partially the product of economic inequality than a desire to preserve culture.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 29, 9:41 AM

This article was interesting because it showed how modern immigration patterns are not that dissimilar from historic patterns.  People come to a new country and they settle in an area that has relatives or familiar people already living there.  The formation of ethnic enclaves is the example.  People are choosing to self-segregate when they immigrate to a new homeland because it is the familiar with in the strange.  Perhaps once the new immigrants have acclimated to Canadian society they may move out of the enclave areas but they also may stay.  It is an interesting example of how people cluster together with similar people when they move to a new country.

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The Best Posts for 2012

The Best Posts for 2012 | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it
Global news with a spatial perspective: resources for educators and the inherently inquisitive. http://geographyeducation.org

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 28, 2012 1:26 PM

This list is a combination of two types of posts.  Some represent the best posts of Geography Education during 2012 as voted by you the viewers (measured by page views) and I've added a few that I feel where my 'favorite finds' of the year.  For more favorites, you can see the best of 2011.

      

Tags: best of 2012, zbestofzbest, geo-inspiration.

Dwane Burke's curator insight, January 1, 2013 1:23 PM

What can you learn by looking at these sites?

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Following 'Geography Education'

Following 'Geography Education' | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.


Staying Connected: You can receive post updates in the way that best fits how you use social media.

Update Notifications: Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest.

              Email: Click 'follow' button at top right of this page.

Sites with Content: Wordpress, Scoop.it.


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Emma Lafleur's curator insight, January 24, 2013 5:34 PM

A great interactive map to learn about different regions of the world.

chris tobin's curator insight, January 24, 2013 5:35 PM

This is a really cool map from class

Marie Schoeman's curator insight, February 20, 2013 4:07 AM

This site collects interesting sites on Geography Teaching. It is anticipated that there will also be articles on differentiation which could assist teachers to present Geography in an inclusive way.

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Geography game: how well do you know the world?

Geography game: how well do you know the world? | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it
Play the Global development game: identify the world's countries and territories, rank them according to GDP then fingers at the ready for the picture round

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Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, December 22, 2012 3:42 AM

Geography game

Eliana Oliveira Burian's curator insight, December 26, 2012 6:46 AM

Are you ready?

 

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 12, 2013 12:07 AM

Ughhhhhh, this is addicting. Must stop playing. Must keep playing so I can beat JC.

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What Could Disappear?

What Could Disappear? | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it
Coastal and low-lying areas that would be permanently flooded in three levels of higher seas.


This interactive feature is designed to answer a simple, yet profound set of questions.  What areas (in over 20 cities around the U.S.) would be under water if the ocean levels rose 5 feet?  12 feet?  25 feet?  The following set of maps show "coastal and low-lying areas that would be permanently flooded without engineered protection." 


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Mary Rack's comment, November 26, 2012 8:03 AM
especially good!
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How Pandemics Spread

View Full Lesson on TED-ED BETA: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-pandemics-spread In our increasingly globalized world, a single infected person can board a pl...


This is a great demonstration of why spatial thinking is critical to so many fields, including medicine.


Tags: diffusion, medical, historical, spatial.


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Interactive World Statistics

Interactive World Statistics | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it

The Brazilian government's geographic department (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística-roughly equivalent to the U.S. Census Bureau) has compiled an fantastic interactive world factbook (available in English and Spanish as well as Portuguese).  The ease of navigation allows the user to conduct a specific search of simply explore demographic, economic, environmental and development data on any country in the world.    


Tags: population, worldwide, statistics, mapping, zbestofzbest.


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Leonardo Martins's comment, October 20, 2012 11:08 AM
So cool…thank you very much!
Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 24, 2012 10:23 AM
The world, here, is literally at your fingertips. It is a simple way for anyone to locate a multitude of data about any given place around the world. It is another way that brings the whole world that much closer in this technological era.
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Rethinking Agriculture

"Growing Power is a national nonprofit organization and land trust supporting people from diverse backgrounds, and the environments in which they live, by helping to provide equal access to healthy, high-quality, safe and affordable food for people in all communities."

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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:56 AM

with the increasing numbers of urban citizens in years to come the key to success in the city will be its ability to adapted to its growing enviroment. It would be nearly impossible for cities to exsit in the future with the current ways of agriculuture, there needs to be a change in the way things are done. Thats why this next gen way of agriculuture is going to take off in urban areas. with the ability to have full farms on rooftops the city will be able to self sustain itself more properly than it does in current times.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:40 PM

For the past three years I have had the luxury of having a garden in my backyard, it is a lot of work but there is nothing better than knowing where my food is coming from. I enjoy going in my backyard and being able to grab vegetables whenever I need them. I also go to farmers markets for vegetables that I don't grow in my own garden.  I would defeniately support local people to get good quality food. 

Lauren Shigemasa's curator insight, January 23, 1:28 AM

a powerful way to increase access to healthy foods! this organization called Growing Power is using urban gardening not only to create a sustainable food source for its neighbors, but also provides a system so we can donate and send a week's worth of fresh fruit/vegetables to any surrounding community in need. so amazing!

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Can You Name These Cities by Their Starbucks Locations?

Can You Name These Cities by Their Starbucks Locations? | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it

"Can you recognize it by its Starbucks locations?  Let’s find out. This quiz shows all of the Starbucks locations within the city boundaries of 20 domestic or foreign cities, and for each you must name the city depicted from four choices."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 24, 2013 1:19 PM

This is my favorite place-based guessing game since GeoGuessr (5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" and you have to guess where).  This isn't about knowing Starbucks locations, but understanding spatial urban economic patterns (just as this article showing the locations where McDonald's and Burger King will place stores also relies of understanding urban economic patterns).  In this Starbucks game you have to recognized the shape of the city, major street patterns and the economic patterns just to name a few.  This is one way to make the urban model more relevant.       


Tags: urbanmodels, economic, trivia.

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 24, 2013 6:53 PM

Unfortuntaley I wasn't very good at this game. I believe I ended up getting 5 answers correct. However what was intersting about this article was to see how each starbucks was placed in certain areas. There were so much more starbucks locations in city areas. The starbucks' also typically were off of main highways or corners. This is for similiar reasons to what we dicussed about dunkin donuts in class. People are only going to travel so far for coffee. If it is not convienent then people will go else where. It is not like car dealership where people will drive out of their way to look. For a coffee people on average may drive 5 minutes. Anything too out of the way people will avoid. That is why there are so many starbucks and dunkins so close to eachother. They are set up equdistant from each other in locations that are convient for people around the area to try and get them to choose their coffee. It is typical to put a coffee shop on the main roads like we see in the maps, as well as in numerous locations to convience the whole area. The more convient the shop the more money they will make. That is why there are some many locations so close to each other. It is interesting to see it visually on a map just how many locations there actually are. 

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World Cities Quiz

World Cities Quiz | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it
Try out some geography trivia in our World Cities Quiz: a great geography quiz that tests your knowledge of some of the major cities of the word!

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What the World Eats

What the World Eats | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it
What's on family dinner tables around the globe? Photographs by Peter Menzel from the book "Hungry Planet"

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John Peterson's comment, April 30, 2013 10:38 AM
This collection of slides does a very good job of showing their very different diets that are present in different areas of the world. While the price of food is obviously going to be different throughout the world, it is very interesting to see he very different types of food that are consumed by different groups of people. In different areas of the world, there is more emphasis on different types of food. In some places for example they may eat a lot of fruit while in others they may eat a lot of beans or bread. The different amounts that these foods are eaten are tied into both the economic and social aspects of these different cultures. This is because in each area, different things are going to be more affordable and available, as well as being more traditionally eaten. There can also be a difference in the percentage of homemade food in a weekly diet in different areas of the world. While some areas will not have any fast food places or restaurants readily available, others will and will often use these locations which will drastically change their diet habits.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
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Mercator Puzzle

Mercator Puzzle | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it

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Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, February 2, 2013 6:26 AM

Des cartes pour comprendre le monde: comprendre la projection Mercator avec ce puzzle en ligne.

Tony Hall's curator insight, February 5, 2013 12:09 AM

This is great fun! A little tricky at first though:)

Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, February 11, 2013 12:03 PM

Great site to show projection and changes in perception on maps.  

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Migration and Geography


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Tony King's comment, January 13, 2013 11:35 AM
Just in case a lot of perfectly sane Americans decide to migrate to a civilized country like Canada
Trisha Klancar's curator insight, January 13, 2013 2:04 PM

I like this as it also sets up the beginning of the lesson if you were were unsure what to do with this.

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 18, 2013 10:07 PM

Migration is what is need in order for the human race to relate to one another and survive. This shows us how we can learn form Migration from a geographical stand point. If you look at the Geography of how and where people move you will it will help you to develop a sense of what is next to come or what is needed to survive.

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A tortuous triangle

A tortuous triangle | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it
SNAKING their way from Kirkuk, a city 240 kilometres (150 miles) north of Baghdad, through Kurdistan and across Turkey’s eastern region of Anatolia to the...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 20, 2012 1:01 PM

Why does the Kurdish population, despite being a territorially contiguous population, unable to control their own destiny?  They are often caught in other geopolitical struggles of the Middle East because:

  1. they are divided between 4 countries (Syria, Iraq Iran and Turkey).  
  2. The mountanous terrain also divides the Kurds
  3. Oil resources ensure that outside forces will fight to control this area 


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U.S. Census Dotmap

U.S. Census Dotmap | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 1, 2013 9:33 AM

This interactive dot distribution map of the United States 2010 census data has many great applications.  The conversation can focus on the symbology of the map (for example, this could lead to a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of dot distribution maps) or notice how certain physical landforms are visible for either their high or low population density.  One of the advantages of this map is that it uses census data at the block level.  This means that the user can visualize distinct scale-dependent patterns.  Sharp divisions (e.g.-urban vs. rural) might have less of a distinct edge as you zoom in.  

UPDATE: This map now includes Canadian and Mexican census data as well as the United States.


Tags: cartography, technology, mapping, visualization, population, density.

Charlie Koppelson's curator insight, February 7, 2013 2:40 PM

This map is very useful in examining the distribution of people and geography in North America. It's easy to see that our once rural based country is completely dominated by cities, most of which are near the coast. It's fun to play around with as you can see where mountain ranges are as well as other topographic changes just by the concentrations of people, or lack there of.

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NCGE's December 2012 Perspective

NCGE's December 2012 Perspective | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 31, 2012 10:23 AM

This screenshot is of a great article in this month's edition of NCGE's newsletter focusing on rural lands and recent changes to rural systems.  Follow the link for the whole newsletter as a flipbook (PDF here) including an edition of Geography in the News on Siberia's Northern Railway.    

Tagsrural, NCGE, unit 5 agriculture.

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Climate Change Video Guide

Climate Change Video Guide | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it
An in-depth, multimedia look at climate change, its global impact, and efforts to combat it.


This guide on climate change from the Council on Foreign Relations (independent think tank) covers many of the geopolitical, economic and environmental issues that confront the Earth as global temperatures rise.  Rather than produce a full length feature film, they have organized the this as an interactive video, allowing the user to get short (a couple of minutes) answer to specific questions about the science, foreign policy or economic ramifications of adapting to climate change. 


Tags: climate change, environmental adaption, economic, industry.


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Seth Dixon's comment, November 27, 2012 8:21 AM
Thanks for sharing this Giovanni!!
Giovanni Della Peruta's comment, November 27, 2012 8:38 AM
Thanks to you, Seth! :-)
Jose Sepulveda's comment, January 13, 2013 8:58 AM
Very good information, Thanks!
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Top 10 Ways to Go Green this Holiday Season

Top 10 Ways to Go Green this Holiday Season | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it
10 ways to go green this holiday season. Zero Waste holiday tips from Eco-Cycle.


This infographic combined with these recommendations are some simple reminders that mass consumption and waste does not contribute to global joy or cheer. 


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Mary Rack's comment, November 25, 2012 8:10 PM
I shared this on Facebook and Google+. Hope for lots of readers and followers!
Seth Dixon's comment, November 25, 2012 8:36 PM
Thanks Mary!
Javier Curso CFIE's curator insight, April 8, 2013 7:37 AM

beautiful, as Susan

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The British have invaded 9 out of 10 countries

The British have invaded 9 out of 10 countries | AP Human Geography JCHS | Scoop.it
Britain has invaded all but 22 countries in the world in its long and colourful history, new research has found.


This is a great map to show the historical impact of colonialism on the world map.  The map is based on the work in the new book All the Countries We've Ever Invaded: And the Few We Never Got Round To.   


Tags: book reviews, colonialism, war, historical, UK. 


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Don Brown Jr's comment, November 5, 2012 1:22 PM
Military conflict is often at times overlooked at as a source of language diffusion however the information displayed in this article can help explain how English has become one of the most popular languages in the world today.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:33 PM

The British have done this in reality, in the physical world, in space and time... but perhaps the Chinese have done this in our minds!  Everything our country trades for has parts made in China.  We simply can't live without these things that may be invented in the US, and designed in the US, but assembled in China.... China has a name for itself, and they're playing a game of Monopoly.  They have hotels on Board walk and Park place, and they're eating us alive... I've conferred with politicians, who say that they're on the verge of turning their hidden empire into a physical one, and going from simple monetary domination to war.  They outnumber the US, and have better technology, and evidently more skill and products.  Not much to say about that, but if they learn from the mistakes of the British, the Chinese could really create a truly elite empire that could outlast any other in human history...  But really, if they include American/Chinese cuisine in their menu, I'm sold at General Tao's chicken... Go China! 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 8:36 PM

This map illustrates just how wide-reaching the British Empire was throughout its history. Though the map cheats a little by including the activities of sanctioned pirates and minor invasions, almost the whole world excepting several very small nations and some difficult to reach inland ones.

 

The most surprising was Sweden considering the proximity and the frequent viking invasions on the British isles which were apparently never reciprocated.