AP Human Geograph...
Follow
Find tag "religion"
8.8K views | +0 today
AP Human Geography Digital Knowledge Base
Why What is Where:  The Digital Knowledge Base for AP Human Geography
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Allison Anthony from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The colourful propaganda of Xinjiang

The colourful propaganda of Xinjiang | AP Human Geography Digital Knowledge Base | Scoop.it

"China is in the midst of a crackdown on what it describes as 'terrorism driven by religious extremism'. The campaign is focused on the western province of Xinjiang, home to China's Uighur ethnic minority who are predominantly Muslim."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 13, 3:11 PM

China does not have a good track record of dealing with ethnic and religious minorities and the murals that can be seen in Xinjiang are a testament to that fact.  This has led to many Muslims in Western China being attracted to more radical ideas.  While I certainly don't condone radicalism nor China's heavy-handed tactics, I am fascinated by the cultural messages that are strategically being placed in the landscape to influence the politics and culture of the region.  


Tags: political, conflictgovernance, China, East Asia, religion, culture, Islam, landscape.

Bharat Employment's curator insight, January 26, 11:34 PM

www.bharatemployment.com

Kendra King's curator insight, April 3, 7:37 PM

This art seems like a logical extension of the government’s use of power although I personally don’t agree with their abuse of power. In China the government will uses its authority to monitor the personal activities of its citizens as demonstrated by the pictures dictating what people should and shouldn’t wear. When the citizens don’t follow through with China’s rule, violence typically happens. In fact, a fair deal of the paintings showed violence (i.e. the tank running people over). I actually find those depictions more offensive and disturbing than any of the other pictures because the end result is clearly that of dath rather than disapproval. Now, I understand that some places need to be ruled with an iron fist (i.e. Iraq), however I don’t really see how threatening people with more violence solves the issue of extremism. If anything, doesn’t this just give the extremist more of a reason to dislike the government? As such, is the government just creating more resentment that will lead to demonstrations in the future? I say this because eventually when a local population is subject to such horrible treatment, there isn't much else to lose and very little reason no to fight back. 

Rescooped by Allison Anthony from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of Mohammed

Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of Mohammed | AP Human Geography Digital Knowledge Base | Scoop.it

"Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of the Islamic Prophet Muhammed, who was born in Mecca, Saudi Arabia in 570 AD. His birthday is marked in way ways is different Muslim countries."  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 26, 2014 2:50 PM

Muslims rejoice, celebrate and honor Mohammed around the world on his birthday. These photos not only represent the celebrations of Mohammed but mark his lasting legacy and influence as an Islamic Prophet.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 2014 2:53 PM

It is nice to see a depiction of the celebrations and happiness of Muslims instead of just violence by radicals. Muslims are frequently misrepresented by the heavy news coverage of the tiny amount of evildoers. It would be like depicting all of the US as Klan members.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 4, 2014 1:52 PM

Women and Men in some Islamic countries live entirely different lives in regards to their geographic spheres. The women dominate the private sphere, they are sheltered from the public sphere. Their architecture reflects that fact. Windows and balconies are constructed so people can see out but not see in from the street. Homes are built so the houses across from one another are not lined up with the front doors directly across from one another. Streets are winding and made so the homes are extremely private. This reflects society in regards to how people view gender. Females are kept out of the public sphere and when they do venture out into the streets, they are encouraged to have a male escorting them. This image above shows the balcony as a barrier keeping females "protected" from the public sphere.

Rescooped by Allison Anthony from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

America's Most (and Least) Religious Metro Areas

America's Most (and Least) Religious Metro Areas | AP Human Geography Digital Knowledge Base | Scoop.it
Provo, Utah, and Burlington, Vermont, represent opposite ends of the U.S. religiosity spectrum.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 7, 2013 11:07 AM

The majority of the most religious metros are concentrated in the South or Utah.  This particular weekend, many of the rythmns of urban life in Utah cities are remarkably visible as the LDS church holds it's semi-annual General Conference.  On the opposite side of spectrum, 5 of the 10 least religious metros are in New England; the west coast is the other center of diminished religiosity (with a mini-center in Colorado). 


Questions to ponder: What cultural patterns help to partially explain the levels of religiosity in the United States?  What other factors explain the patterns of religiosity in your in your local area? 


Tags: USA, culture, religion, Christianity.

Lyn Leech's comment, August 23, 2013 5:45 PM
The fact that as you get more westward (disregarding Utah,) religion looses popularity has to do with the people who, in the past, migrated there. It could be argued that super-religious people back in the old days who came from England to escape religious prosecution tended to get to the east coast and then settle there, whereas people who didn't have a church as a tether would be more likely to go out east to look for gold and things. It's an interesting map, regardless and the west's seeming lack of religion may be due to the fact that most of the population of the US is based on the east, due to extreme conditions in the west such as mountains and deserts.
Scooped by Allison Anthony
Scoop.it!

'Like lesser Americans': Atheists face discrimination, persecution, report says

'Like lesser Americans': Atheists face discrimination, persecution, report says | AP Human Geography Digital Knowledge Base | Scoop.it
GENEVA -- Atheists and other religious skeptics suffer persecution or discrimination in many parts of the world and in at least seven countries can be executed if their beliefs become known, according to a report issued Monday.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Allison Anthony from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Where Does the South Begin?

Where Does the South Begin? | AP Human Geography Digital Knowledge Base | Scoop.it
Roads? Religion? Accent? Food? Which factor dictates where the North ends?

 

This is a great intellectual exercise to help students think about regions and how we define them.  The article can help also inform some of their thinking since one of the main problems for students in drawing regional boundaries is a lack of place-based knowledge.   

 

Tags: regions, USA.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:49 PM

Borders... the first thing I think of was a giant bookstore near my hometown... it now ceases to exist, having been replaced by Barnes and Nobel...  As for the political organization of space, I could apply this situation and laugh.  Borders will cease to be, and they will be called after people's last names!  I think this has already happened, when people unite together in countries such as the USA- although borders are specific, the general federal laws and many policies still apply in all states... generally. And people's names are often the namesakes of places.  I don't like the idea of borders, though, it seems like a bunch of warmongers trying to get ahead in a world where they can't truly cheat death, so they cheat other people of land that may have been decreed in ancient documents as property of their ancestors, or even in accordance with the righteousness of the universe and what should be alloted to whom.  Ownership is a concept of denial, because no one can truly own anything, not even our bodies, which contain trillions of infinite universes the size of the large one around us that we commonly refer to.  Borders are relative, and will likely become recognized as obsolete.  I know this was abstract, but it's my thoughts on the topic.

Scooped by Allison Anthony
Scoop.it!

Buddha Bar: ‘I never thought I’d say this, but I wish the Buddha was smaller’

Buddha Bar: ‘I never thought I’d say this, but I wish the Buddha was smaller’ | AP Human Geography Digital Knowledge Base | Scoop.it
For 21 months, a giant fiberglass Buddha sat untouched at a shuttered club. Now it must be auctioned off.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Allison Anthony
Scoop.it!

Muslim population growth faster than global rate

Muslim population growth faster than global rate | AP Human Geography Digital Knowledge Base | Scoop.it
70% of global population growth over the next 30 years will be in Muslim countries
Allison Anthony's insight:

"Around 70 per cent of global population growth over the next 30 years will be in Muslim countries as the Muslim population of 1.6 billion is growing at twice the rate of the global population thus representing the fastest growing consumer segment in the world,"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Allison Anthony
Scoop.it!

Good Lord: In China, Christian Fundamentalists Target Tibetans | TIME.com

Good Lord: In China, Christian Fundamentalists Target Tibetans | TIME.com | AP Human Geography Digital Knowledge Base | Scoop.it
Tibet is one of the most coveted locations for nondenominational American and Korean Christian groups angling for mass conversion
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Allison Anthony
Scoop.it!

Hans Rosling: Religions and babies | Video on TED.com

TED Talks Hans Rosling had a question: Do some religions have a higher birth rate than others -- and how does this affect global population growth? Speaking at the TEDxSummit in Doha, Qatar, he graphs data over time and across religions.
more...
No comment yet.