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AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
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23 maps and charts on language

23 maps and charts on language | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it

"Did you know that Swedish has more in common with Hindi than it does with Finnish? Explaining everything within the limits of the world is probably too ambitious a goal for a list like this. But here are 23 maps and charts that can hopefully illuminate small aspects of how we manage to communicate with one another."

 

Tags: language, culture, English, infographic.


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Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 26, 2014 1:40 PM

Mapping of languages...

Isabella El-Hage's curator insight, March 19, 11:15 AM

This article links with Unit Three through "language and communication". These 23 maps range from the history of languages, which languages connect with which, common languages in certain places, different phrases used in the same country for the same thing, and more. Looking at maps to spatially see language helps when trying to understand how the world communicates. One of the maps that I found interesting was the "New York tweets by language". It shows how diverse that city is, and how people are still preserving their native language in a English prominent country.  

Avery Liardon's curator insight, March 23, 9:00 PM

Unit 2:

Shows how many languages are actually closely related. Whether or not they sound the same or are located in similar regions, many share the same origins. For example: many words in Spanish and English are the same due to their similar roots. 

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Business Languages In Africa

Business Languages In Africa | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it

"The Main Languages of Business in Africa."


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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:53 PM

This map shows the different languages that are used for business dealings in Africa. It is interesting to see that Africa itself has many languages, but not one of them is predominantly used. The two languages that are mainly used in Africa are English and French, with  Arabic, Portuguese, Spanish and a combination of Arabic and French used in Mauritania, while English and French is used in Madagascar.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:38 AM

The continued influence of colonization can be seen when this map is compared with maps of colonial Africa. The dominant business language match up almost exactly with the country that used to dominate the area. The fact that these languages are used for business shows how the deep impacts the European settlers had across the continent. Even the northern portion of the continent shows the strong influence and ties the region has with the Arabic world. 

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 9, 3:48 PM

The English language seems to be spread out mostly throughout central and southern Africa. But I never though of the language of french being taken up by 30% of Africa. When I look at this map, I try to think about how close these languages are to their respective countries. For instance, I would imagine Arabic being closer to the eastern part of Africa since the middle east is closer to Eritrea, Djibouti and Somalia. Also, I would think that the french and spanish languages would be closer to the northern part of Africa since France and Spain are north of Africa.

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America's Most (and Least) Religious Metro Areas

America's Most (and Least) Religious Metro Areas | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
Provo, Utah, and Burlington, Vermont, represent opposite ends of the U.S. religiosity spectrum.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 7, 2013 11:07 AM

The majority of the most religious metros are concentrated in the South or Utah.  This particular weekend, many of the rythmns of urban life in Utah cities are remarkably visible as the LDS church holds it's semi-annual General Conference.  On the opposite side of spectrum, 5 of the 10 least religious metros are in New England; the west coast is the other center of diminished religiosity (with a mini-center in Colorado). 


Questions to ponder: What cultural patterns help to partially explain the levels of religiosity in the United States?  What other factors explain the patterns of religiosity in your in your local area? 


Tags: USA, culture, religion, Christianity.

Lyn Leech's comment, August 23, 2013 5:45 PM
The fact that as you get more westward (disregarding Utah,) religion looses popularity has to do with the people who, in the past, migrated there. It could be argued that super-religious people back in the old days who came from England to escape religious prosecution tended to get to the east coast and then settle there, whereas people who didn't have a church as a tether would be more likely to go out east to look for gold and things. It's an interesting map, regardless and the west's seeming lack of religion may be due to the fact that most of the population of the US is based on the east, due to extreme conditions in the west such as mountains and deserts.
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More than a club: FC Barcelona and Catalonia's road to independence

As Catalonia goes to the polls, Sid Lowe looks at one of the region's great cultural sporting icons and its role in Catalan identity...

 

Sports and cultural identity of a region are often intertwined. As Catalonia is poised to break from Spain, this video shows how the local teams (especially FC Barcelona) are at the center of political identity and part of the very fabric of the political movement that is pushing for independence.  For more, see this recent GITN.

 

Tags: sport, Spain, Europe, devolution, autonomy.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 12, 2013 12:54 PM

Sports and cultural identity of a region are often intertwined. As Catalonia is poised to break from Spain, this video shows how the local teams (especially FC Barcelona) are at the center of political identity and part of the very fabric of the political movement that is pushing for independence.  For more, see this recent Geography in the News article.


Tags: sport, Spain, Europe, devolution, autonomy.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 30, 2014 9:10 PM

As a soccer fan and a fan of FC Barcelona, Whenever I watch FC Barcelona play against Real Madrid, the commentators always describe both clubs as a symbol of independence and the symbol of political identity. Both teams are embodiments of the struggle that Spain and Catalonia are going through.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 19, 3:01 PM

As a soccer fan (although of CR7 in La Liga), I know that Barca has the saying "Mes que un club" which means more than a club in the Catalan language.  FCB's colors, in fact, represent the colors of Barcelona, which is the major force in the region of Catalonia.  The club allows the ethnic people to express pride in their heritage, and allowed them in the Franco era, a freedom of expression that was not otherwise granted to them.  However, as the video discusses, FCB cannot be the main force for the region's independence, that will have to come from the people pressing the people to the Spanish Government.  However, FCB represents for the Catalans a pride in having their own unique culture, and being a unique people different than ethnic Spaniards.  Barca being more than a club is far different from the BPL team of Manchester United or the La Liga club of Real Madrid.  While these clubs may represent regions within the countries, they do not represent regions who are different than the status quo.  Followers of Man U are not very different than the Southern English (they are not their own people).  I think it is highly interesting how sports teams can mean so much to certain regions.

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Where Does the South Begin?

Where Does the South Begin? | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
Roads? Religion? Accent? Food? Which factor dictates where the North ends?

 

This is a great intellectual exercise to help students think about regions and how we define them.  The article can help also inform some of their thinking since one of the main problems for students in drawing regional boundaries is a lack of place-based knowledge.   

 

Tags: regions, USA.


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:49 PM

Borders... the first thing I think of was a giant bookstore near my hometown... it now ceases to exist, having been replaced by Barnes and Nobel...  As for the political organization of space, I could apply this situation and laugh.  Borders will cease to be, and they will be called after people's last names!  I think this has already happened, when people unite together in countries such as the USA- although borders are specific, the general federal laws and many policies still apply in all states... generally. And people's names are often the namesakes of places.  I don't like the idea of borders, though, it seems like a bunch of warmongers trying to get ahead in a world where they can't truly cheat death, so they cheat other people of land that may have been decreed in ancient documents as property of their ancestors, or even in accordance with the righteousness of the universe and what should be alloted to whom.  Ownership is a concept of denial, because no one can truly own anything, not even our bodies, which contain trillions of infinite universes the size of the large one around us that we commonly refer to.  Borders are relative, and will likely become recognized as obsolete.  I know this was abstract, but it's my thoughts on the topic.

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With A Database, Germany Tracks Rise Of Neo-Nazis : NPR

Despite six decades of required anti-Nazi teaching in German schools, neo-Nazis are on the rise. And last month, the country established the first centralized database to track them. - NPR

 

Some communities in Germany show an increase in the numbers of Neo-Nazis living there, and they have other living in fear.  Neo-Nazis have even gained a small foothold in the government.  Is Germany returning to its old ways or is it trying to head off this trend with its new tracking database?

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Gangnam Style: Three Reasons K-Pop Is Taking Over The World : NPR

Gangnam Style: Three Reasons K-Pop Is Taking Over The World : NPR | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it

How Korea added pop music to its list of global exports.

 

A now developed country has built up its music industry infrastructure to the point that its product has diffused to the West.  Some K-Pop music videos are the most watched You Tube videos in the world.

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Old Ways Disappearing In The New Mongolia : NPR

With desertification, drought and a booming mining industry, Mongolians are leaving the traditional life of herding. Herdsman Bat-Erdene Badam says he will be the last in his family to tend livestock.
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In Cricket-Obsessed India, Soccer Soars in Popularity

In Cricket-Obsessed India, Soccer Soars in Popularity | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it

Through hierarchical diffusion, the more affluent, younger generation has been exposed to the worldwide craze over soccer and prefer the game to cricket.  [Soccer] is "much cooler than cricket."

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Endangered Languages Project

Endangered Languages Project | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it

A project to preserve the world's dying languages.

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Seth Dixon's comment, June 29, 2012 12:19 PM
Love this! I'll rescoop it but I want to showcase the embedded video.
Allison Anthony's comment, June 29, 2012 12:27 PM
Great! A former student found this. I'm trying my own Scoop It page because my school system is likely going to block Pinterest from student access. Hopefully they will leave this one alone!
Seth Dixon's comment, June 29, 2012 1:42 PM
Sorry to hear that about pinterest, I know how much work you put into that. Currently I only know of one school district that blocks scoop.it (Palm Beach FL), but since it is technically a socially mediated site, it still is potentially on the block list (why I created geographyeducation.org, to get around firewalls, just it case). Good luck, feel free to "rescoop" any of mine to save yourself the time of posting new content.
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Which Place Is More Sexist, The Middle East Or Latin America?

Which Place Is More Sexist, The Middle East Or Latin America? | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro has lived and worked in both regions and says there's plenty of sexism to go around, though it comes in different forms.
Allison Anthony's insight:

No, that didn't say SEXIEST!  

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Are Elvish, Klingon, Dothraki and Na'vi real languages?

View full lesson on TED-ED: What do Game of Thrones' Dothraki, Avatar's Na'vi, Star Trek's Klingon and LOTR's Elvish have in common? They are all fantasy constructed languages, or conlangs. Conlangs have all the delicious complexities of real languages: a high volume of words, grammar rules, and room for messiness and evolution. John McWhorter explains why these invented languages captivate fans long past the rolling credits.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 4, 2014 10:54 AM

This TED ED video lesson brings up some important questions to ponder for cultural geography (and uses some popular fantasy/science fiction examples to do it).   For languages that are spoken by actual populations, they often 'borrow' vocabulary from other languages, making some ask the question, can loan words damage language integrity? 

 

Tags: language, culture.

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China's one-child policy creates massive gender imbalance

The Chinese government says its so-called "one-child policy" has succeeded in reining in its population. But more than three decades after the policy's imple...

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Christina Dadaian's comment, July 5, 2013 4:13 PM
They'll have to balance out eventually. Either that or have the entire population suffer. It may take time but I imagine that things will correct themselves before it's too late.
Brooklyn McKenzie's comment, August 2, 2013 12:14 PM
It's kind of sad. I hope that those four brothers will some day find the love of their life. It must be pretty sad to see happy couples when you're single. Maybe one day things will even out.
Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 21, 2013 5:28 PM

This video gives a summary of the extreme consequences the "one-child policy" China has set in place. There are so many more men than women now, many are left to be bachelors for life. Many Chinese women are moving into the city looking for a rich and powerful man, and they succeed because there men are eager to marry. The Chinese have always had a preference for male children over female children. Now that the difference in population in so high, the government has made it illegal for doctors to tell parents the sex of their child before birth. This is a great example of the different kinds of culture that exist on the other side of the world. 

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Mixing Past And Present In Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea, once home to cannibals, still has an exotic aura. The local tourist economy caters to those notions, and visitors may see a hybrid of the traditional and the modern.

 

This story is an intriguing blend--we see traditional cultures engaging in the global economy. They have created two villages: a traditional one designed for tourism filled with emblems of their folk cultures, and another one where people work, live eat and play with various markers of outside cultural and technological influence.

 

"Tourists are taking pictures. They don't want to take pictures of those who are in Western clothes.  People who are in Western clothes are not allowed to get close to people who are dressed up in the local dressings."

 

Questions to Ponder: Which village do you see as the more "authentic" one? How can culture also be a commodity?

 

Tags: folk culture, tourism, indigenous, culture, economic, rural, historical, unit 3 culture, Oceania.


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Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, December 16, 2014 7:30 PM

The different villages that represent different times in which Papua New Guinea lived in is great for tourism. The one town is like the developed and tourist town where people stay. The other town right next door to the tourist town represents the present day traditional town that tourists expect what Papua New Guinea is like. It’s almost like it is a planned out set up attract tourists to that town to get the full cultural Papua New Guinea experience. 

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 17, 2014 1:27 AM

Having two villages in one in Papua New Guinea is an interesting concept.  One village has people living in the present and the other has people living in the past, the village that tourists want to see.  They come to this village and see half naked natives carving canoes, cooking over open fires, and other things that happened in the past.  This is beneficial because they are able to keep the culture alive, the language is able to still be used and traditions are kept from disappearing.  Unfortunately for these people they have seen western more modern life and don't like living in this past for the pleasure of tourists.  First we come in and take away their traditions, clothes and languages and now we come back begging for them to not leave any of it behind, well except the cannibalism. 

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 17, 2014 7:54 PM

It frustrates me sometimes when Europeans, and Westerners travel to an uncommon land and expect the inhabitant of the land to act in barbaric ways. With the tourist who visit the land of Papua New Guinea, they are often times expecting the natives to act in an uncivilized manner, such as being cannibalistic. Yet, the natives have made great stride to keep up with the ever changing world in which they are a part of. One of the concerns that the elders have with the upcoming generation is how long will it be before their native language vanishes completely. One thing I can appreciate about the native people of this land is their capability to cast tourist from entering or engaging with the natives while they are in their native clothing. 

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Spanish Crisis Revives Calls For Catalan Secession

Spain's dismal economy has residents of the country's richest region, Catalonia, wondering if they'd be better off going it alone. With their own language and distinct culture, Catalans have long pushed for independence from Spain.

 

This podcast merges several geographic strands together as economic turmoil in the southern portion of the Euro Zone has fanned the flames of cultural resentment and put discussions for Catalonian independence on the agenda for local politicians. 

 

Questions to ponder: Will this internal devolution cause greater disintegration in the European Union or Spain?  Would an independent Catalan be a wise move for the Catalonians?  How would their independence impact Spain?    

 

Tags: political, autonomy, economic, Europe, devolution, sovereignty, unit 4 political.


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Forest People Return To Their Land ... As Tour Guides : NPR

Forest People Return To Their Land ... As Tour Guides : NPR | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it

In 1991, the Batwa forest people of Uganda were evicted from their land to make way for gorilla conservation. Like other displaced Central African hunter-gatherers, when they lost their forest, they lost much of their identity. - NPR

 

Interesting story of a traditional tribal group in Central Africa who has been pushed out of their homeland to make way for parks that protect wildlife.  This directly affects their ability to live their lives and hunting for survival.  Is racism a factor?

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Hong Kong protest over school 'brainwashing' by China - Telegraph

Hong Kong protest over school 'brainwashing' by China  - Telegraph | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
Thousands of protesters surrounded Hong Kong's government headquarters on Monday over a plan to introduce a pro-China school curriculum that they describe as an attempt to brainwash students.
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Map of the Day: Soda vs. Pop vs. Coke

Map of the Day: Soda vs. Pop vs. Coke | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it

An updated map of the distribution of the usage of the terms pop vs. soda..and now vs. coke.

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Vanishing Languages - Pictures, More From National Geographic Magazine

Vanishing Languages - Pictures, More From National Geographic Magazine | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
One language dies every 14 days. By the next century nearly half of the roughly 7,000 languages spoken on Earth will likely disappear, as communities abandon native tongues in favor of English, Mandarin, or Spanish.
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Emily Bian's curator insight, October 3, 2014 5:31 PM

"One language dies every 14 days. By the next century nearly half of the roughly 7,000 languages spoken on Earth will likely disappear, as communities abandon native tongues in favor of English, Mandarin, or Spanish."

This is so sad, but it really opened up my eyes to all the languages out there. I never realized how many different dialects there were until I read this article. It's crazy! It's sad how people stop speaking a unique language because some languages are dominating. When someone loses their language, they lose a part of them self and their culture. 

We have to try to preserve languages, or else we won't have many soon in the future.

3) language and communication

I really loved reading this article, and I have to share it with others. I recommend this to future students as background knowledge of culture and the role language plays in one's culture. We must preserve language, because it's sacred.