AP Human Geograph...
Follow
Find tag "borders"
5.8K views | +0 today
AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
Why What is Where: The Digital Knowledge Base for APHG at the Herm
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Allison Anthony from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Challenges in Defining an Israeli-Palestinian Border

Challenges in Defining an Israeli-Palestinian Border | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
There are major hurdles in drawing borders between Israel and a future Palestine.

Israeli and Palestinian negotiators resumed peace talks in Washington in July for the first time in three years. While the talks are initially expected to focus on procedural issues, they are already beginning to take on a last-ditch quality. Explore some of the contentious issues that negotiators have faced in drawing borders between Israel and a future Palestinian state.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 4, 7:55 PM

This five-part video report from the New York Times is from 2011, but still has some pertinent information, even if the situation has changed in some of the particulars.  These videos brings important voices from a variety of perspectives on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict; together they all  show how a complex cultural and political geography leads to many of the difficulties in creating a long-lasting peace.  The discipline of geography doesn't simple study the peace process--it is a part of it.  The creation of borders and the cartographic process play a critical role in solving territorial issues.  Geography can be both the problem and the solution. 


Tags: Israel, borders, Palestine, territoriality, political, Middle East.

sriddle geo's curator insight, July 17, 8:48 PM

Found this article and the videos to be very interesting after the conversation we had earlier in the week in class.

Mr. David Burton's curator insight, July 17, 10:49 PM

Thoughts from my friend Seth...

 

Seth Dixon's insight:

This five-part video report from the New York Times is from 2011, but still has some pertinent information, even if the situation has changed in some of the particulars.  These videos brings important voices from a variety of perspectives on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict; together they all  show how a complex cultural and political geography leads to many of the difficulties in creating a long-lasting peace.  The discipline of geography doesn't simple study the peace process--it is a part of it.  The creation of borders and the cartographic process play a critical role in solving territorial issues.  Geography can be both the problem and the solution.

Scooped by Allison Anthony
Scoop.it!

Why are we building new walls to divide us?

Why are we building new walls to divide us? | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
We chart the routes of, and reasons for, the barriers which are once again dividing populations
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Allison Anthony
Scoop.it!

Here’s the Chinese passport map that’s infuriating much of Asia - Wash. Post

Here’s the Chinese passport map that’s infuriating much of Asia - Wash. Post | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
A map on page 8 of the new passport shows disputed territory and islands, not to mention Taiwan, as part of China.
Allison Anthony's insight:

According to several other Asian countries, China included some areas on its new map printed in its passports that don't belong to China.  A marked up image in the article shows the approximate territories in dispute and discusses what the other countries are doing in response to have some of their lands "taken".

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Allison Anthony from Cultural Geography @ JTCC
Scoop.it!

Map: Every Country in the World Involved in a Territorial Dispute

Map: Every Country in the World Involved in a Territorial Dispute | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
Hint: Unless you live in Mongolia, your country's probably on this list.
Allison Anthony's insight:

Check out this map and article that shows how most of the world's countries have an issue with a neighbor over its boundaries. S/O to Mongolia and some other landlocked countries...I guess nobody wants you...

more...
Allison Anthony's curator insight, March 21, 6:17 AM

Check out this map and article that indicates that most countries are having some type of border dispute with a neighbor.

Rescooped by Allison Anthony from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Take This State And Shove It: The New Secession Movement

Take This State And Shove It: The New Secession Movement | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
Residents of rural areas feel shut out of their states' politics, so why not create their own?

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Heather Ramsey's curator insight, November 18, 2013 2:25 PM

On election day this year, several Colorado counties voted on whether to secede from Colorado and create a new state. Many of the counties voted in favor of the idea. (See the link below for more info on the Colorado secession movement.) This is not the first time groups of Americans have considered (and voted on) breaking away from their state. When political issues come up and decisions are made by the government and/or the people, some get their way and others do not. The article explains one way that some people have decided to take action when they do not feel their interests are being served.

 

BONUS for my students:

1) What steps do you think should be taken before people consider seceding from their state?  

2) What are some possible pros and cons of breaking away from a state to create a new one?  

3) Hypothetically speaking, what would it take for you to want to create a new state?

 

Here is the link to the article about Colorado's secession movement:

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/colorado-rural-voters-approve-secession-idea-20850962

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:43 PM

Some states urban and rural areas have had differences and beliefs when it comes to politics. For example Virginia and West Virginia have had their differences and this is what has caused them to seperate. If every state did this there would be too much craziness because im sure each state would have a different belief and nobody would agree on anything. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 1, 7:57 PM

This article is about segments of California, Colorado, and Oregon wanting to separate and become their own states so their voices can be heard in Congress.

 

If, hypothetically, new states were formed out of existing ones this kind of gerrymandering would likely only lead to even more new states. It might even lead to a secession arms race to gain more Democrat and Republican seats in the Senate. With so many new states, it could lead to increased division, with no Democrat or Republican wanting to set foot in an opposition’s state. In the long run though, political affiliations do eventually change and we would have a precedent analogous to attempting to take the ball home when the other kids don't want to play the same game as you, which is not how a democratic republic works.

Scooped by Allison Anthony
Scoop.it!

Border & Boundaries - Wikipedia

Border & Boundaries - Wikipedia | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it

Yes this is from Wikipedia, but it's a great synopsis about the history of borders and current examples.  At the bottom of the page is a photo gallery of some famous/infamous borders and boundaries across the globe that show how different countries feel about alerting travellers that they are crossing into new territory.  Cool pictures!

more...
No comment yet.