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Why What is Where: The Digital Knowledge Base for APHG at the Herm
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Let’s Talk About Geography and Ebola

Let’s Talk About Geography and Ebola | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
Why knowing where countries are in Africa matters for how the rest of the world thinks about Ebola.

 

Cultural and media norms that often refer to Africa as one entity rather than an 11.7 million-square-mile land mass comprised of 54 countries and over 1.1 billion people who speak over 2,000 different languages.  This cultural confusion means that, when a dangerous virus like Ebola breaks out, Americans who are used to referring to “Africa” as one entity may make mistakes in understanding just how big of a threat Ebola actually is, who might have been exposed to it, and what the likelihood of an individual contracting it might be.  This Ebola outbreak is wreaking havoc on African economies beyond the three most heavily affected by Ebola, and that damage is completely avoidable. The East and Southern African safari industry provides a good example. Bookings for safaris there — including for the famed Great Migration in Kenya and Tanzania — have plummeted due to the Ebola outbreak. These actions are based in fear, not reality.

 

Tags: Ebola, medical, diffusion, Africa, regions, perspective.


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Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, November 4, 2014 4:24 PM

I completely agree with this article. Most of people see Africa as one entity, which is not true. I include myself in that group of people because I used to think the same thing. After analyzing this issue in one of my class, I could realized that is not true. There is a lot of people who think that especially when the Ebola issue.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, March 18, 9:36 PM

It doesn't surprise me that the average person doesn't know his geography.  It shocks the hell out of me that a college would put themselves in a situation to look that stupid!  Do your research people.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 5:08 PM

This is another example of stereotyping taking its course through Africa.  Even though I am aware of the size and diversity of Africa, I was guilty of associating Ebola with the whole continent and not just the affected areas.  Same thing goes with the AIDS virus and other things, such as poverty.  Articles are great for people in other parts of the world to read to better educate them on the size and diversity of Africa and that there are many different ways of life in its 54 countries.

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Business Languages In Africa

Business Languages In Africa | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it

"The Main Languages of Business in Africa."


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Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:38 AM

The continued influence of colonization can be seen when this map is compared with maps of colonial Africa. The dominant business language match up almost exactly with the country that used to dominate the area. The fact that these languages are used for business shows how the deep impacts the European settlers had across the continent. Even the northern portion of the continent shows the strong influence and ties the region has with the Arabic world. 

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 9, 3:48 PM

The English language seems to be spread out mostly throughout central and southern Africa. But I never though of the language of french being taken up by 30% of Africa. When I look at this map, I try to think about how close these languages are to their respective countries. For instance, I would imagine Arabic being closer to the eastern part of Africa since the middle east is closer to Eritrea, Djibouti and Somalia. Also, I would think that the french and spanish languages would be closer to the northern part of Africa since France and Spain are north of Africa.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 10:46 PM

This map is a simple but powerful one. Africa is the continent that contains the most nations (53), yet it uses only six languages for business. Not surprisingly, all of the languages (with the exception of Arabic) are European in origin. Clearly, the effects of colonialism are still felt around the world in former colonies. The languages that were forced upon various African countries by their colonizers have endured and become the main languages of business in their respective countries. What is just as unfortunate as the roots of colonialism holding fast, if not more so, is the absence of any indigenous languages being used as the language of business in any of the countries of Africa. While using a business language that is spoken by much of the world is surely a matter of practicality and logistics, it is still robbing African countries of their heritage and culture to some degree.

 

This brings up the issue of globalization and how it is constantly at odds with the preservation of culture and tradition. In order for Africa (or any continent or region or country) to function in the modern world, it must be capable of conducting business in a language that is spoken by its business partners. The ability to do business with virtually any person, company, or country in the world is an obviously invaluable one. At the same time, however, it allows for the subtle and gradual erasure of unique culture and traditions. So while it would be ideal for cultural preservation for countries to conduct business in their indigenous languages, it seems to be a necessary evil for smaller and less influential countries to adopt the languages of their more powerful and influential business partners if they wish to survive in today's world. 

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Can the Planet Support 10 Billion People? - Room for Debate

Can the Planet  Support 10 Billion People? - Room for Debate | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it

How will countries feed and shelter populations that are expected to soar by century's end?  In an NYT "Room for Debate", specialists discuss various aspects of a soaring population by the end of this century.  Using topics to argue their point, such as education, food, technology, and problems in Africa, check out their viewpoints to see if it is really something we can control.  

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Full Extent of Africa’s Groundwater Resources Visualized for the First Time

Full Extent of Africa’s Groundwater Resources Visualized for the First Time | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it

Until now, there has been a lack of solid, comprehensive spatial data about African groundwater resources.  Researchers have now done so.  For a more academic article on the subject, here are their findings in Environmental Research Letters. 

 

Tags: water, Africa, resources, physical, environment, environment depend.    


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How Ebola sped out of control

How Ebola sped out of control | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
The story behind the failure of the world's health organizations to stop the Ebola disaster.

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Bella The Non-Vampire's curator insight, January 12, 10:18 AM

The development between MDCs and LDCs are very different in a lot of ways. The Ebola epidemic is handled in two different ways because of the levels of development in countries. in MDCs there is more of a health indutry and can cure sicknesses much faster than those countries of less development. 

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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 9, 2:29 PM

It was sad that it took over 4 months for there to be declared an epidemic.  I think if this hit in the US or Europe then things would have been taken care of a lot faster.  Out of sight, out of mind till one trickled in then another.  Then we got scared.  But Africa needs to get it together and create a better continent with healthcare systems that work.  The doctors over there said it looked medieval.  I believe that and can't even fathom how horrible it was.  

Molly McComb's curator insight, May 27, 11:11 AM

Talking about the failure of WHO to stop the Ebola outbreak and how the low developed countries were so quickly affected by the disease. 

 

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Forest People Return To Their Land ... As Tour Guides : NPR

Forest People Return To Their Land ... As Tour Guides : NPR | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it

In 1991, the Batwa forest people of Uganda were evicted from their land to make way for gorilla conservation. Like other displaced Central African hunter-gatherers, when they lost their forest, they lost much of their identity. - NPR

 

Interesting story of a traditional tribal group in Central Africa who has been pushed out of their homeland to make way for parks that protect wildlife.  This directly affects their ability to live their lives and hunting for survival.  Is racism a factor?

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Can the Planet Support 10 Billion People? - Room for Debate

Can the Planet  Support 10 Billion People? - Room for Debate | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it

How will countries feed and shelter populations that are expected to soar by century's end?  In an NYT "Room for Debate", specialists discuss various aspects of a soaring population by the end of this century.  Using topics to argue their point, such as education, food, technology, and problems in Africa, check out their viewpoints to see if it is really something we can control.  

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