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NYT: 'How to Build a Country From S

NYT: 'How to Build a Country From S | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
The filmmakers present a 12-step program to establish the world's newest country: South Sudan.
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AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
Why What is Where: The Digital Knowledge Base for APHG at the Herm
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Pastafarians rejoice as Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster is granted permission to register as a religion in Poland

Pastafarians rejoice as Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster is granted permission to register as a religion in Poland | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it

"A church that worships an invisible flying spaghetti monster can now apply to be registered as an official religion in Poland, after a 2013 court ruling was overturned in April, 2014."

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Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, March 14, 8:35 PM

Unit 3 Cultural Patterns and Processes

      The article discusses Pastafarianism and how it is becoming an actual religion in many parts of the world even though it basically is a satire of Christianity and mocks other religions. Pastafarians worship the Flying Spaghetti Monster and have interesting views and beliefs.

       Religion is a key part of culture and many people's day to day activities. There are many ancient religions which have millions of followers and there are also some religions that have been dying away. However, it has been rare to see new religions emerge in our day and age, but Pastafarianim is a very young religion which is questioned by many and considered a joke to many people.

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Mecca Becomes A Mecca For Skyscraper Hotels

Mecca Becomes A Mecca For Skyscraper Hotels | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
Mecca is the destination for Muslim pilgrims. To house the millions of worshippers, massive hotels are rising at a furious pace, upsetting those seeking to protect the city's traditional architecture.
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Bitter harvest

Bitter harvest | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
OVER the past five years, as farm wages soared, sugar-cane growers in southern China looked across the border to Vietnam for help. They hired Vietnamese...
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Avery Liardon's curator insight, May 20, 10:29 AM

Unit 5:

With the rise of commercial agriculture, people all around the world suffer from famine and crop production issues both directly and indirectly. Because China is such a large component in the production of sugarcane, they export on a global scale. With a decrease in production causes a decrease in sales, and eliminates other countries from gaining an export, which can hurt many different economies. 

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, May 26, 6:38 PM

Summary: This article discussed China's current crop production situation, and it's goal of self-sufficiency. Currently, and surprisingly, China is mostly self-sufficient, and has been for a while, even through disastrous famines. But in recent time, China was been struggling with its self-sufficiency goal, because of how much the government has to pay local farmers to keep them afloat, and especially compared to the lower import prices. Farms in China were able to pay illegal Vietnamese workers more cheaply, but with recent tension between the two countries, the immigrants have been shut out. There also isn't enough water, and with the use of chemicals to try and produce crops more quickly, the  water that's left is polluted. So, although self-sufficiency in China seems pretty manageable, it's actually a lot farther away than it seems.

 

Insight: This relates to interdependence and production and consumption values, because it shows what kind of an outlier China is. Most countries rely on imports and the global market to get all of the available food products, and this creates a lot of global interdependence. China, however, is trying to move away from the global scheme, into that of nationally grown crops and products, which hasn't really worked out numerically, as the population of China is consuming more than it is producing. 

Molly McComb's curator insight, May 27, 11:14 AM

Showing how different countries in Asia have been affected by the growning need for sugar cane. Chinese farmers were hiring vietnamese workers to till their fields. Around 50,000 vietnamese workers travel to Chinese cities especially during the winter harvest. But due to political issues, China has begun to turn the migrants away and fend for themselves. 

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The aftermath of Nepal’s earthquake exposes Asia’s geopolitical fault lines

The aftermath of Nepal’s earthquake exposes Asia’s geopolitical fault lines | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
After earthquake, Nepal rejects Taiwan's help and tells India to not interfere in Chinese airspace.
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Map: Where the East and the West meet

Map: Where the East and the West meet | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
The length of the list says less about the places in question and more about the flimsiness of East and West as cultural constructs.
Allison Anthony's insight:

Great for a cultural or political discussion

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Avery Liardon's curator insight, May 20, 10:46 AM

Blends concepts from both human geography and world history, providing explanations for both sides of the argument. Interesting outlook, and would serve as a good topic to debate or host a model UN discussion about it.

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Japan Eyes Matchmaking, Paternity Leave to Lift Birth Rate

Japan Eyes Matchmaking, Paternity Leave to Lift Birth Rate | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
Policy proposals come amid an aging population
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Isabella El-Hage's curator insight, March 18, 12:24 PM
This article links to Unit Two through "promoting population growth". Japan has always faced low birth rates, and the elderly take up 25% of Japan's population! For the fourth year in a row, Japan's birthrates have been at an all time low, and the Japanese government has started to take action. Several methods have been started including matchmaking, and local governments have started to promote speed dating. Free nursing care has been expanded along with building more fertility centers, and increasing paternity leave. I think all the Japanese efforts will soon show results, and the the birth rate will slowly increase.
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Last Week Tonight with John Oliver: U.S. Territories (HBO) - YouTube

A set of Supreme Court decisions made over 100 years ago has left U.S. territories without meaningful representation. That’s weird, right?

Allison Anthony's insight:

Brilliant!

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Raychel Johnson's curator insight, May 25, 6:09 PM

Summary: In this video clip, John Oliver talked about the role that territories of the United States play, and what rights they do or don't have as part of the United States. None of the territories have any voting rights, so their votes for president, if held, don't get counted in whatsoever. Also, they have nearly no medical facilities available to them, even though most of the residents are veterans of some war or another. They also have no representation in the Senate or House, and even if they have a delegate, that delegate has no voting rights. 

 

Insight: This video shows how the contemporary political pattern has shifted, especially away from developing regions. Even though these territories are claimed by the United States, and are inhabited by United States citizens, they still don't have the same rights as a United States citizen inhabiting a state. The political pattern is to encompass an area to gain sovereignty over it, even if they don't have the same political rights as a normal state. 

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Italy's birth rate drops to lowest in 150 years

Italy's birth rate drops to lowest in 150 years | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
Fewer babies were born in Italy in 2014 than in any other year since the modern Italian state was formed in 1861, new figures have revealed.
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Isabella El-Hage's curator insight, March 18, 2:23 PM

This article links to Unit Two through "decreased birth rate consequences". Italy is now facing an all time low in birth rates, and immigration has decreased too, not helping the problem. Some people believe that society's thought process today is that having children is a burden or even a risk. They also think that people are becoming more selfish because they're choosing not to have children. Economy is slow due to declined birth rates, there are less people to occupy jobs, and people move away to start businesses. The Pope even said he thinks people need to remember the beauty in large families.  

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23 maps and charts on language

23 maps and charts on language | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it

"Did you know that Swedish has more in common with Hindi than it does with Finnish? Explaining everything within the limits of the world is probably too ambitious a goal for a list like this. But here are 23 maps and charts that can hopefully illuminate small aspects of how we manage to communicate with one another."

 

Tags: language, culture, English, infographic.


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Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 26, 2014 1:40 PM

Mapping of languages...

Isabella El-Hage's curator insight, March 19, 11:15 AM

This article links with Unit Three through "language and communication". These 23 maps range from the history of languages, which languages connect with which, common languages in certain places, different phrases used in the same country for the same thing, and more. Looking at maps to spatially see language helps when trying to understand how the world communicates. One of the maps that I found interesting was the "New York tweets by language". It shows how diverse that city is, and how people are still preserving their native language in a English prominent country.  

Avery Liardon's curator insight, March 23, 9:00 PM

Unit 2:

Shows how many languages are actually closely related. Whether or not they sound the same or are located in similar regions, many share the same origins. For example: many words in Spanish and English are the same due to their similar roots. 

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Take A Mouth-Watering Tour Of School Lunches From Around The World

Take A Mouth-Watering Tour Of School Lunches From Around The World | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
Eating at the school cafeteria could've been amazing if you grew up almost anywhere but the U.S.

 

Tags: agriculture, food distribution. 


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Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, March 24, 2:37 AM

I really thought I should share this article that shows the different food lunches across the world. It reflects on the country and its economy. I believe we should change our lunches to make them more healthy as the other countries. We should add more fruits and take out the cookies. 

Emily Bian's curator insight, March 25, 5:53 PM

This is a really cool article! I always enjoy looking at food from around the world, so I automatically scooped this when I saw it. This is a article with a slideshow of school lunches around the world. At the very end of the photo slide, there is a photo of an American school lunch which is pretty embarrassing compared to Brazil and Finland. This photo series was taken by SweetGreens, and the school lunches were put together to represent an average school lunch, not necessarily what they have every day. 

They talk about how each country eats what is grown around them, while US is processed food like chicken nuggets and chocolate chip cookie.

I really want to move to Brazil and eat their school lunch, haha! It looks so good. For dessert in Finland, they have a berry crepe on their plate! That's awesome! If you have some free time, then be sure to check this out! 

5) Interdependence among regions of food production and consumption

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, May 25, 6:46 PM

Summary: This article showed a series of pictures, which showed traditional school lunches of different countries. Greece's lunch included a Mediterranean diet, while Brazil's had rice and beans with greens, and the United States had its classic chicken nuggets, chocolate chip cookie, and mashed potatoes. The goal of this article was definitely to show what foods were incorporated into different cultures and climates.

 

Insight: Food is one example of a cultural trait, and quite a prominent one. Tradition may prohibit or encourage eating a certain kind of food, while long term climate also makes a large difference on the crops traditional grown in a country. 

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15 Countries In 4 Minutes (Time Lapse)

"During the past two years, Kien Lam went on the kind of trip most could only dream about. The photographer wanted to "see as much of the world as possible," so he visited 15 countries around the globe, from Mexico to New Zealand, snapping more than 10,000 photographs along the way. He edited his work together to make this stupendous time-lapse, which may be one of the most envy-inducing travel diaries I've ever seen."

 

Tags: landscape, time lapse, video.


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Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 28, 1:00 AM
http://www.bharatemployment.com/
Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, March 8, 11:09 AM

Magnifique

Eden Eaves's curator insight, March 23, 11:56 PM

Unit 3

This time-lapse is one of the most amazing videos I've ever seen. Displaying the street-life in India, sand dunes in Arizona, the coast of Cozumel, coral reefs in Australia, mountains in Nepal, a castle in Scotland, Dubai's bright night lights, hobbit holes in the Shire and so many more amazing places captured in a few short seconds. It truly makes me feel like I traveled the world in 4.5 minutes.

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Growing number of Chinese women "renting" boyfriends for New Year's

Growing number of Chinese women "renting" boyfriends for New Year's | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
A growing trend in China is the sale of fake boyfriend rental services, particularly on China’s largest online marketplace, Taobao. Many young women are buying these services as a way to stave off ...
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Christopher L. Story's curator insight, February 27, 8:58 AM

What does this say about cultural norms? 

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The history of ‘Death to America’

The history of ‘Death to America’ | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
Why have so many groups called for "Death to America" -- and can the United States trust any of them?
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Molly McComb's curator insight, May 27, 12:37 PM

A Shiite insurgent group in Yemen has created a slogan called "Death to America, death to Israel, and damnation to the Jews". Unfortunately it is not uncommon for a Death To America Slogan to appear, but it origionally took place in Iran when tensions were very high between out countries. 

Shiite insurgent group known as the Houthis emerged as the preeminent power in Yemen, a slogan created by the group, one integral to their history, has come under scrutiny:

“Death to America, death to Israel, damnation to the Jews.”

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Slavery's last stand - CNN.com

Slavery's last stand - CNN.com | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
Mauritania's endless sea of sand dunes hides an open secret: An estimated 10% to 20% of the population lives in slavery. But as one woman's journey shows, the first step toward freedom is realizing you're enslaved.
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France Declares All New Rooftops Must Be Topped With Plants Or Solar Panels | CSGlobe

France Declares All New Rooftops Must Be Topped With Plants Or Solar Panels | CSGlobe | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
A new law recently passed in France mandates that all new buildings that are built in commercial zones in France must be partially covered in either plants
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Orsolya Serfőző's curator insight, May 27, 8:20 AM

Great idea!

christian's curator insight, May 27, 9:35 AM

Unit 5: land use

This article mainly tells you how France is trying to be "greener" by passing a law that says "all new buildings in commercial zones must be partially covered in either plants or solar panels" 

This article ties into unit 5 by showing how the french lawmakers are making their commercial zones more efficient and healthier by having the greenery and or solar panels on the top of buildings. 

Molly McComb's curator insight, May 27, 11:36 AM

Global use of fossil fuels has decreased due to the increase of alternative energy sources. With this, France passed a new law that in commercial or urban zones rooftops must be partially covered in plants or solar panes. These roofs help reduce the amount of money needed to heat building in the winter and cool it in the summer. If the global population continued to increase the use of these green roofs, the amount of fossil fuels will continue to reduce. 

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Europe's boat people

Europe's boat people | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
THE SMUGGLING of people across the Mediterranean is not new; nor are the losses at sea that come with it. But the trade has vastly expanded over the past few years...
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The aftermath of Nepal’s earthquake exposes Asia’s geopolitical fault lines

The aftermath of Nepal’s earthquake exposes Asia’s geopolitical fault lines | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
After earthquake, Nepal rejects Taiwan's help and tells India to not interfere in Chinese airspace.
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You Won't Believe How Much Sprawl Costs America

You Won't Believe How Much Sprawl Costs America | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
More than $1 trillion, according to a new report.
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The West Bank Battle For Land ... And Water

The West Bank Battle For Land ... And Water | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
In the 1990s, Israelis and Palestinians made temporary arrangements in the West Bank as they worked toward a peace deal. The talks are now in the deep freeze, but the arrangements are entrenched.
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The changing nature of regional poverty

The changing nature of regional poverty | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
We’re witnessing a dramatic change in the social geography of greater Richmond. It’s becoming more like that of the global south, where wealth is centered in the cities and poverty rings the outskirts of the city.
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China’s Pearl River Delta overtakes Tokyo as world’s largest megacity

China’s Pearl River Delta overtakes Tokyo as world’s largest megacity | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
Several hundred million more people are expected to move to cities in East Asia over the next 20 years as economies shift from agriculture to manufacturing and services, according to a World Bank report
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Can India become a superpower?


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Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 2, 3:16 PM

This video discusses the concept of India becoming a Superpower, which has for a long time been predicted (BRIC).  The BRIC countries are Brazil, Russia, India, and China.  China is currently the strongest out of the group, but in this piece it is discussed how India can itself become a regional power.  India's main geographic way to secure itself as a superpower is to control the Kashmir region, as Pakistan and China can share a border if India is not there.  For India this is concerning as China could influence Pakistan, a long time rival of India, to invade and give them support.  Another weakness of India is the "federation, almost a confederation" idea that surrounds the power of the states in the country.  India is supposed to be a democracy like the United States, but because of its large size and various ethnic backgrounds, it is hard to unify all the states.  However, India does have a large population and if the country continues to modernize and solves the Kashmir problem it will be in a stronger position to become a regional player.  Another thing that India will have to do is to have good relations with Bangladesh, so China can't influence attacks from either direction.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, April 6, 5:04 PM

Once referred to as the crown of British Empire, India is now resurging as a great power. The Ganges River gives some of the most fertile land in the world at its delta, and runs through India like the Mississippi. Geographically isolated on most of its borders, with mountain ranges and oceans leaves India disconnected or protected, like a castle.  In this isolation there is a lot of conflicts, without proper dams to protect this fertile land, it is always at a flood threat. All of India’s major cities are situated at the base of rivers to promote expansions. If India cannot secure water for the bordering nations it will not be able to become a superpower, and lower the gap between rich and poor.  

Paul Farias's curator insight, April 9, 11:29 AM

If you were to ask me before watching this video, i would say absolutely. They have the capability because they are full of intelligent people, they also have enough people to do it. Something is just holding them back from moving forward...

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Chart: The sad state of religious freedom around the world

Chart: The sad state of religious freedom around the world | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
77 percent of the world's population lived in countries with "high" or "very high" levels of restriction on religion in 2013.
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Why Turkish troops entered Syria to reach a medieval tomb

Why Turkish troops entered Syria to reach a medieval tomb | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
The mausoleum of Suleyman Shah was a geopolitical sticking point in the Syrian conflict.
Allison Anthony's insight:

Geopolitics!

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Why the ‘Geo’ in Geopolitics Still Matters - Geopoliticalmonitor.com

Why the ‘Geo’ in Geopolitics Still Matters - Geopoliticalmonitor.com | AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony | Scoop.it
Geography still has a lot to tell us about the roots of international conflict.
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