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Hot commodities

Hot commodities | AP Human Geography Finnegan | Scoop.it
Photos of the mass production of the Earth's natural resources

Via Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Economy and Crime Spur New Puerto Rican Exodus

Economy and Crime Spur New Puerto Rican Exodus | AP Human Geography Finnegan | Scoop.it
Puerto Rico’s extended woes, including high unemployment and pervasive crime, are causing a worrisome exodus of professionals and middle-class residents to places like Florida and Texas.
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The invisible women who hunt terrorists

The invisible women who hunt terrorists | AP Human Geography Finnegan | Scoop.it
One of the analysts who hunted the al Qaeda leader says the role of women in terrorism probes is downplayed
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Exiled Pakistani ex-president home to 'save' nation despite death threat

Exiled Pakistani ex-president home to 'save' nation despite death threat | AP Human Geography Finnegan | Scoop.it
More than four years after he resigned as Pakistan's president and left, Pervez Musharraf returned to the country Sunday, intent on running in May elections.
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The girl the Taliban wanted dead

The girl the Taliban wanted dead | AP Human Geography Finnegan | Scoop.it
The Pakistani teen blogger simply wanted to get an education. But she became a global symbol of empowerment for young women.
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What If the Entire World Lived in 1 City?

What If the Entire World Lived in 1 City? | AP Human Geography Finnegan | Scoop.it

Two Yale architects pose the question in an ambitious research project.


"Hsiang and Mendis have increasingly come to believe that the only way to study and plan for our urban planet is to conceptualize its entire population in one seamless landscape – to picture 7 billion of us as if we all lived in a single, massive city."


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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 17, 2013 1:54 PM

I was very exited by the work being done by Bimal Mendis and Joyce Hsiang.  I hear to much on the news and in conversation about over population, energy shortages and brutal living conditions.  Creating a digital interactive medium is the most efficient way to educate the internet consuming public about issues and developments all over the world.  It reminds me of the blue marble picture taken from Apollo 17, the first full color image of our planet.  This image is considered to be the defining moment that awoke the conservation movement and understanding that the earth is our home and should be treated as such.  I cant help hoping a program like “the city of seven billion” will help people to relies we are all one species and from that develop a move beneficial way of coexisting.

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Yemen Still Sentences Children to Death by Firing Squad

Yemen Still Sentences Children to Death by Firing Squad | AP Human Geography Finnegan | Scoop.it
The country is one of only four left on Earth that still allows capital punishment for minors.

Via Jane Ellingson
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The corruption map of the world

The corruption map of the world | AP Human Geography Finnegan | Scoop.it
Transparency International's transparency index measures each country in the world on corruption.

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Cultural Perspectives

Cultural Perspectives | AP Human Geography Finnegan | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 10:12 AM

This political cartoon is just another great example of how different cultures are across the globe. Here in America, we are told that the appropriate swimwear to wear to the beach only covers about a third of our body. Where as in the Middle East, wearing a burka is what they are told is the right type of clothing to wear. Whether it be for religious, cultural, or fashionable reasons, women wear all types of clothing and I don't believe it is directly due to male influence. There are many things that could cause this influence such as the church, family, or the media. Yet as the cartoon says, each woman thinks the men in that country are forcing them into wearing clothes like that and their culture is dominated by men. I guess it just shows the different perspectives each culture can have. 

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:51 AM
This cartoon depicts the cultural differences between two different cultures. On the right you have a woman in a traditional burka that covers all but her eyes. On the left you have a woman in a bikini which is what is apropriate to wear on the beach or to bed. Two totally different societies and beliefs and they both look at one another and see the other person as inapropriate. This is not the first time another country has looked at the USA and turned their nose up to something that we do differently.
Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 16, 2013 6:31 PM

when I look at this the first thought that comes to mind is it is easy for other people to judge. just by there comments they have no idea what the others beliefs are,. This is a classic judging a book by it's cover. The are both assuming it has to do with a male dominating world. I think it has to do with what you are comfortable with. 

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Geography Quiz Tournament

Geography Quiz Tournament | AP Human Geography Finnegan | Scoop.it

Challenge your knowledge of Geography from around the world in our 'Where in the World?' Quiz Tournament. It's just £0.49 ($0.75) to enter with a cash prize of £30 ($45) up for grabs. Enter now if you think you know your stuff!


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 9, 2013 9:28 AM

Just an FYI for you trivia buffs who love online gamesThis is an opportunity to see how you compare to others.  This tournament is open until March 14th.   

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Global State of Agriculture

Global State of Agriculture | AP Human Geography Finnegan | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Mercor's curator insight, March 21, 2013 6:18 AM

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 1, 10:30 AM

Unit V, main idea of the unit!

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 15, 10:00 AM

Unit 5

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What the World Eats

What the World Eats | AP Human Geography Finnegan | Scoop.it
What's on family dinner tables around the globe? Photographs by Peter Menzel from the book "Hungry Planet"

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John Peterson's comment, April 30, 2013 10:38 AM
This collection of slides does a very good job of showing their very different diets that are present in different areas of the world. While the price of food is obviously going to be different throughout the world, it is very interesting to see he very different types of food that are consumed by different groups of people. In different areas of the world, there is more emphasis on different types of food. In some places for example they may eat a lot of fruit while in others they may eat a lot of beans or bread. The different amounts that these foods are eaten are tied into both the economic and social aspects of these different cultures. This is because in each area, different things are going to be more affordable and available, as well as being more traditionally eaten. There can also be a difference in the percentage of homemade food in a weekly diet in different areas of the world. While some areas will not have any fast food places or restaurants readily available, others will and will often use these locations which will drastically change their diet habits.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
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Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century

Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century | AP Human Geography Finnegan | Scoop.it
New nations seem to pop up with alarming regularity. At the start of the 20th century, there were only a few dozen independent sovereign states on the planet; today, there are nearly 200!

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The state of our union is … dumber: how linguistic standards have declined in the president's address

The state of our union is … dumber: how linguistic standards have declined in the president's address | AP Human Geography Finnegan | Scoop.it
Using the Flesch-Kincaid readability test the Guardian has tracked the reading level of every state of the union

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 14, 2013 10:22 AM

I do NOT think that this implies that U.S. presidents are getting dumber and less articulate...I do think that this says much more about the intented audience.  On one hand I am glad that presidents today are trying to connect with all citizens regardless of their eductional background, but I wish that their ideas were more nuanced and content-laden instead of fluffly sound-bites.    

Heather Ramsey's curator insight, February 20, 2013 7:54 PM

For any text that you read, it can be measured and evaluated to determine the reading level. Teachers use different methods to figure out the level of texts that they give to you, and they compare the reading levels to grade levels in school.  For example, "Harry Potter and the Socerer's Stone" is written at a 5th grade reading level, according to the book company Scholastic. This link from the Guardian shows an interactive timeline of all State of the Union addresses and the reading level of the speech given by the presidents. This does not mean that the presidents have been getting dumber. It just means that over time the speeches have become accessible to more and more Americans regardless of their education level. But the timeline does show an interesting trend. Take a look below the timeline at the level of the State of the Union speeches for each president and compare the quotes. Do they seem more complex to you as they go back through the years?

 

 

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Wielding Whip and a Hard New Law, Nigeria Tries to ‘Sanitize’ Itself of Gays

Wielding Whip and a Hard New Law, Nigeria Tries to ‘Sanitize’ Itself of Gays | AP Human Geography Finnegan | Scoop.it
Since Nigeria’s president signed a law criminalizing homosexuality, arrests of gay people have multiplied and demands for a crackdown have flourished.
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Global poverty is falling, so what's the problem?

Global poverty is falling, so what's the problem? | AP Human Geography Finnegan | Scoop.it
For more What in the World, watch GPS, Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

By Global Public Square staff

Watching countries from around the world grow and prosper, we tend to assume that global poverty is falling.
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North Korea's threats: Five things to know

North Korea's threats: Five things to know | AP Human Geography Finnegan | Scoop.it
It seems barely a day passes without another North Korean threat,
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Women's Political Rights

Women's Political Rights | AP Human Geography Finnegan | Scoop.it
International Women's Day: political rights around the world mapped

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 15, 2013 5:19 PM

The UN Millenium Goals include gender equity and gender empowerment. The  goals are set to be achieved by 2015.

Rishi Suresh's curator insight, December 5, 2013 9:04 PM

This map is interesting because it shows several rights that were historically denied women except in modern times. Based on the information on the map, most countries only gave women these rights in the 20th century, usually within the last 50 years. This is shocking because it shows just how recently women were granted rights that men have had for millenia. In fact, Saudi Arabia and the UAE still don't grant women the right to vote in the 21st century.  In the last century, we have gone to the moon, we have created weapons that can level countries, and we have planned to go to Mars, but some people still do not have the right to choose their leaders. 

Dandavikranth Reddy's curator insight, December 5, 2013 11:02 PM

This article is about women having their political and personal rights such as freedom from oppression, abuse, and other things. Also, this article is about how people are trying to spread women's political rights throughout the world but it is just too hard. This article is on this page because it relates to how women are struggling to get their freedom while some countries have gotten it easily. This article benefits people who are motivated to help those in dire need or support, people who will continue to stand uo for these women, and people who can start a movement to end this madness once and for all. This article is related to the book Half the sky because most of the developed countries around the world have freedom for their women, but some countries are still fighting the horrors of rape, genital mutilation, prostitution, bridal and honor killings, and many more. 

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Ecology of Plastic Bags

Ecology of Plastic Bags | AP Human Geography Finnegan | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 13, 2013 12:44 PM

Tags: pollution, infographic, ecology.

Mariela Guzmán's curator insight, April 17, 2013 2:07 PM

What do you think about these images?Do you you agree?or not?

Caroline Sara Chateau's curator insight, August 24, 2013 11:08 AM

really interesting infograph please have a look on it, will warn and make you think about the pollution that plastic bags cause.

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Habemus papam: There is a new pope

Habemus papam: There is a new pope | AP Human Geography Finnegan | Scoop.it
(3rd UPDATE) The new leader of the world's 1.2 billion Catholics is expected to deliver a speech in an hour

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Maricarmen Husson's comment, March 14, 2013 8:42 AM
I'm so happy! The first Argentine Pope!
Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 10, 2013 3:44 PM

As a Catholic I see the need for tradition in culture.  Even as culture changes, I think there is still a place for it even in today's modern, fluid culture.  Tradition gives us a base to build a culture.  Yes cultures do change, but they have to start somewhere and traditions are the place to start.  Question, where would you be without some of your traditions? what would you miss?  We all start somewhere, after I was married and had kids, we started our own family traditions, but alot of them are based on older traditions,like a huge dinner at Christmas....mmm 5 courses and an expanding wasitline :).

Al Picozzi's comment, July 10, 2013 3:46 PM
I agree, there still is a place for tradition even in modern culture. We need somewhere to start and traditions are a good place.
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A New Way to Illuminate Inequality Around the World

A New Way to Illuminate Inequality Around the World | AP Human Geography Finnegan | Scoop.it

Want to know where the poor live? Look at where the light isn’t.

 

"Satellite photos of Earth’s artificial lights at night form a luminescent landscape. But researcher Chris Elvidge of NOAA and colleagues from the University of Colorado and the University of Denver realized that they could also illuminate something much darker: the magnitude of human poverty. By comparing the amount of light in a particular area and its known population, they realized that they could infer the percentage of people who are able to afford electricity and the level of government spending on infrastructure development. This allowed them to extrapolate levels of human development—a measure of well-being that includes such factors as income, life expectancy and literacy."


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City Life Changes How Our Brains Deal With Distractions

City Life Changes How Our Brains Deal With Distractions | AP Human Geography Finnegan | Scoop.it
A new study finds that urban minds don't pay as much attention to their surroundings unless they're highly engaging.

Via Seth Dixon, Jane Ellingson
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 2, 2013 3:58 PM

It's often noted that people from smaller towns prefer a slower pace of life and people from large cities enjoy the hustle and bustle more.  So does the urban environment change how we handle the vast quantity of information in major metropolitan areas?  This article points to data that says it does.  


Tags: rural, housing, urban, planning, density, urbanism, unit 7 cities.

nancercize's curator insight, May 31, 2013 10:03 AM

This helps explain why we are exhausted at the end of the day, and why a walk in the park is so refreshing. We need to make sure city folk have parks nearby.

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Wealth Inequality in America

Infographics on the distribution of wealth in America, highlighting both the inequality and the difference between our perception of inequality and the actua...

Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 4, 2013 10:00 AM

This video does have a political bent that may or may not reflect your views, but it nicely lays out data that graphically represents the economic differences that we see in the United States today.  Our perception is as skewed as what is and what we think it should be.  

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, March 6, 2013 2:36 PM

Des Amériques: les Etats Unis. 

Jennifer S. Hong's curator insight, December 27, 2013 3:39 PM

"In a country well governed, poverty is somehing to be ashamed of. In a country badly governed, wealth is something to be ashamed of." -Confucius.

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Where the Hell is Matt?


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 9, 2013 10:11 PM

I've seen other "Where the Hell is Matt" videos and this recent one is building on that tradition.  These videos show some fantastic international icons and people around the world.  Simultaneously, this video show the unique cultural elements seen around the world while showing the essential beauty of our common humanity.  Who wouldn't want to go to all the places that Matt has been? 


Tags: geo-inspiration, worldwide, folk culture.

GeoBlogs's curator insight, March 11, 2013 3:41 AM

Where can you send Matt ?

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South Sudan: The World’s Newest Country

South Sudan: The World’s Newest Country | AP Human Geography Finnegan | Scoop.it

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 5:08 PM

South Sudan recently gained its independence from Sudan. South Sudan is now home to 10-12 million people and is the 193rd member of the United Nations. However, just because South Sudan became independent from Sudan does not mean it does not no longer carry some of the remaining issues.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 1:26 PM

This infographic gives an idea of why South Sudan seceded from the rest of the country. Decades of civil war preceded the secession, and it is clear the cultural differences between the two areas were a contributing factor. South Sudan is a part of the fertile Sahel, with the majority of its people Christian, while Sudan is mostly desert, with the majority of its people Muslims. South Sudan, as a new nation, faces a number of difficulties. Its new government needed to remain stable to focus on nation building, but war has broken out between the government and a rebel faction. South Sudan, should it become stable again, should work to improve the education of its people, as the infographic explains, since the vote to secede needed symbols rather than words due to only 15% of its people being literate.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 4:05 PM

South Sudan has separated itself two years ago from the rest of Sudan. Its powers have become acknowledged by other countries and its messages to the outside world are ones of peace.

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In A Grain Of Golden Rice, A World Of Controversy Over GMO Foods

In A Grain Of Golden Rice, A World Of Controversy Over GMO Foods | AP Human Geography Finnegan | Scoop.it
A rice enriched with beta-carotene promises to boost the health of poor children around the world. But critics say golden rice is also a clever PR move for a biotech industry driven by profits, not humanitarianism.

Via Seth Dixon
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Kevin Cournoyer's comment, May 1, 2013 12:52 AM
As important and widely used crops go, rice is probably the most important and the most widely used in the world. As a diet staple in Asia and Africa, it helps to feed billions of people everyday. Genetically modified race promises not only nourishment, but increased nutrients for the people who consume it as a major part of their diets. The recent test of this genetically modified rice on Chinese children without full disclosure of what the rice was, however, was seen as a huge problem by many.
The ethicality of the situation is what bothered most opponents of the test, but those in favor of the super rice argue that it is good for everyone, because it helps impoverished populations who are otherwise unable to acquire the nutrients they need. This article highlights the importance of rice in a vast physical geographic context, but also deals with the idea of economic and cultural geography because of the modified rice’s impact on a large number of people’s eating habits and standard of living.
Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 7:14 PM

     This a very difficult debate because whoever is against using any type of enhancement  to food or any other product, no matter if is for their benefit they wont want to here about it. But I do feel that if is for the best and if is going to help for a better nutrition, I think is a good idea. I think that people are going to consume rice no matter what, if the price of the rice doesn’t goes up, the consumption will be the same but if they raise the prices because it has “more vitamins” them the consumption will be less. The world every day is getting poorer and people are having aDifficult time feeding their love ones.

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 4, 2013 3:07 PM

I thought this NPR broadcast was a great out of class referece to listen too.  As it explaine all the work and research that was being done with GMOs, it also exposed them for there flaws and what the real motives behind them are. While this ex source of rice with extra vitman A will deffenitly provid more nutitonal value then regular rice, it also provides higher profit margins for the bioengneer compaines that make it. So its almost hard to say weather GMOs are a bad or good thing beacuse they do have benifts, but one thing is clear there not just being made to help the poor, there being made for big profit possibilities.