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The Evolution of Western Dance Music

The Evolution of Western Dance Music | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"An Interactive Graphic Showing The Evolution of Western Dance Music Over The Last 100 Years in Under 20 seconds..."

 

Excellent visualization of diffusion as well as cultural syncretism in the pop cultures affiliated with globalization.  


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Seth Dixon's comment, November 4, 2011 4:36 PM
Thanks to one of my favorite people at my table at the APHG reading in Cincy for posting this link on FB.
Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 8, 2011 10:12 PM
This is a great visual to demonstrate the connection between cultures. We are such a diverse society and I think it is very important to be interconnected with other cultures and be aware of them. Looking at that visual it demonstrates with each year going by more and more pop culture gets connected with other countries.
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After Alabama Immigration Law, Few Americans Taking Immigrants' Work

After Alabama Immigration Law, Few Americans Taking Immigrants' Work | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
ONEONTA, Ala. -- Potato farmer Keith Smith saw most of his immigrant workers leave after Alabama's tough immigration law took effect, so he hired Americans.

 

Geography is all about the interconnected of themes and places.  This issue in Alabama is displaying these interconnections quite vividly.  Economics, immigration, culture, politics and agriculture are intensely intertwined in this issue.   


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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 29, 2014 9:57 AM

This is another article that highlights the skill deficit in this country.  People seem to be afraid of doing hard work and would rather do nothing then work hard to learn this skill.  If it were a choice between no job and this type of job people would take the jobs but the third choice of unemployment payments makes people who might do these jobs decide not to.  As long as they are paid more to not work then work, they will not do the jobs that need workers.  The farmer made a good point that a skilled picker can make $200-$300 a day but an unskilled worker doing the job makes only $24 a day.  The work ethic of this country needs to be changed, young people today do not want to work hard or put in the effort.  When farmers can no longer get workers how long will it be before there is a food problem as well as a worker problem in this country.  It is possible to make a good living doing these types of jobs but not as long as people feel the work is beneath them or they are unwilling to do the hard manual labor required to do the job well.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, January 28, 2015 12:26 PM

i see this as a very good law. America is on the verge of recovering from an economic recession and the United States can benefit from every job given to a natural born american citizen. i do see the problems that a  farmer can have such as receiving a decline in profits if they must pay more for the product. in the article the farmers also say that Americans just do not work like seasoned Hispanics and production is way down. another looming problem that the Americans have is that they are slow, and want to call it a day after lunch, and expect to get paid more. 

Kendra King's curator insight, February 2, 2015 5:36 PM

As the title implies, this is about how Americans are not cut out for doing intensive farming jobs because the workers just quit quickly. A few politicians mentioned in the story, Governor Robert Bentley and Senator Scott Beason, said they received thank you messages from constituents who found work. This was supposed to be evidence of Americans benefitting from jobs that immigrants took, but I would love to know how many of those people actually stayed with the job. Furthermore, I find it a bit too suspicious that none of the people wanted to speak with the press as the author mentioned or that the names just weren’t given. I am more inclined to believe the owners of the famers mentioned in the article, who said they can’t keep Americans on their site happy due to lack of pay and benefits. Mind you now it wasn’t just one owner who said this either. I think this is telling as well because the owners are the individuals who best know the industry as they work it every day.

 

From the farmers perspective the new law is now a huge problem that could also affected consumers. They lost steady “Hispanics with experience,” who they knew could handle the work. For some farmers, according to the article, has made it so the produce is left on the vine rotting because it isn’t picked. So in essence, what the Arizona law just did was harm agriculture and the buyers too because if enough of that food perishes the price will go up. Now I can understand a state being aggravated over illegal immigration (it is a serious problem that is nowhere close to being solved), but to pass a law with these kinds of economic ramifications isn’t really helping the situation much either. As much as people hate to admit it, our economy needs immigrants from Mexico for our agriculture sector to work. It is just a little known fact.

 

The new law isn’t the only law at issue in this article. Connie Horner of Georgia tried to legally hire workers through the government’s visa program. She soon found it is too costly for her to do and too time consuming, so instead Ms. Horner is turning to machines. The fact that visas are that hard to attain for workers is also part of the reason the immigrants come illegally. Rather than spending more money to watch the boarder how about the government figure out a way for the bureaucracy of the immigration process to move quicker. This isn’t an issue of 2011 either when the article was written. Listening to the news, I have heard farmers complain about the visa program for years. No wonder immigrants come over illegally and then citizens get angry at these people. Really, American’s should be more annoyed with their government’s ineffective stance on boarder control. 

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Video: "EAT" by Rick Mereki

Foods from around the world...This is a playful video clip that leads students to have more questions than answers about different places.  The spirit of exploration and experimentation is at the heart of this global traveler's montage of delightful dishes.  Watching this encourages viewers to open their minds to new ideas, cultures and places. 


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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 7:58 PM

Watching this video made me hungry hahaha. This video is a good example of why we should try different food. Living in the united state has giving me the opportunity to learn about different culture. I feel that  if we try different food we are not only becoming less judgmental but we are also contributing economically. We don’t have to go to Italy to enjoy a great pizza. We can go stay here and spend our money here. At the long run it will help our economy to grow more efficiently. Made In America!!!

Alison Antonelli's curator insight, December 4, 2013 9:48 AM

This is an interesting video because some people are extremely particular with what they eat. I like this video because it makes the viewers of the video wonder what they actually could be missing out on with all of the wonderful food they could be consuming. 

Courtney Burns's curator insight, December 8, 2013 1:55 PM

Even though this video barely had any words it still said a lot. It showed so many different foods from so many different places. It was pretty awesome to see the different foods that different cultures put together. One thing that I thought was funny was when the guy was eating the candy apple with popcorn attatched to it. I've had a candy apple and I've had popcorn, but never together. It would be intersting to know what country that was from. Also another thing that really cuaght my eye in the video was when the guy ate the cricket! What country eats crickets as part of their meal? That is so crazy. Meals really do tell a lot about the culture of a particular place. It is amazing to me that just from a simple dish you can learn so much about a countries culture. The first thing I always do when I go somewhere new is try the food. I have to say I loved Italy!

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Exploring Languages: Gullah Net

Exploring Languages: Gullah Net | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Explore Gullah culture in South Carolina with Aunt Pearlie-Sue.

 

The audio component is the most crucial part of this site, since it allows students to hear Gullah being spoken for a language unit.  Is Gullah a separate language from English?  Is it a dialect, accent or pidgin?   


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, October 25, 2011 8:48 PM
I dont know how I feel about this website. I feel as though the way Aunt Pearlie Sue is speaking or this Gullah language is just a accent. Although this accent is prejudging that, that is how down in South Carolina they speak but, doesn't every state have its own accent? For example Rhode Islands accent of words such as car, park where we don't pronounce the letter endings.
Seth Dixon's comment, October 28, 2011 2:19 PM
It most certainly is at least an accent, but I'd argue that it is also a distinct dialect for English. The words, sentence structure and pronunciation are distinct and the vocabulary is born out a cultural experience that evokes a greater difference from "standard English" that the Rhode Island "bubbler" for "wicked smart" kids.
Are regional dialects a hinderance economically? Should we culturally seek to preserve them?
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The truth and it's opposite: Japanese Addresses

How Japanese addresses work, and other opposites, by Derek Sivers - http://sivers.org...

 

What is true is often dependent on your perspective, the context and is situated within a particular paradigm.  This is a mind-blowing video because it exposed our framework (which might go unquestioned as universal) to be but one of many ways in which to organize the world and the information within it.  

 

Those of you who are stymied by a school's filter and feel you can't use YouTube in the classroom, try YouTube Downloader: http://youtubedownload.altervista.org/ ;


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Alex Smiga's curator insight, October 4, 2015 11:30 AM

Nice little eye opener for when you think you know anything for certain

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The Geography of Educational Performance

The Geography of Educational Performance | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
A new report from the Department of Education puts all the latest educational data at your fingertips.

 

Partly geography education, but this link is more the geography of education within the United States.  The top 10 states are in green, with the bottom 10 in red.  What factors play a role in the distribution patterns visible?   


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America's Fertility Class Divide

America's Fertility Class Divide | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Since the average American woman has 2.1 children, you might think we aren't experiencing a national fertility crisis.

 

This article effectively conveys the global trend of lower fertility rates coinciding with higher rates of female education, wealth and development.  As a bonus, it shows that within a given country, fertility rates are not uniform, but vary between demographic classes. 


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Seth Dixon's comment, September 28, 2011 10:42 AM
My pleasure...
Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 24, 2014 2:24 PM

In the article, Lerner details why the United States' healthy birthrate of 2.1 children per woman is a deceiving number. While other first world nations like England and Germany are suffering from overall low birthrates, the United States is suffering due to the low birthrates in high-income brackets and high birthrates in low- income brackets. This discrepancy is reinforced by a lack of paid leave laws for new parents in the US, making having a child a burden for potential parents with aims of furthering their careers. Similarly, lower income women do not have enough access to publicly funded family planning programs.

 

This dichotomy in birthrates in the US will likely have a negative effect on the nation's economy going further. If most of the nation's children are being born into poor families the next generation of Americans are more likely to have worse access to education and be unable to obtain higher paying jobs than if the birthrate were more uniform across income brackets.

Kendra King's curator insight, January 28, 2015 7:48 PM

This article showed how when you average the birth rate in the United States, it obscures a larger issue between classes. According to the article, the birthing rate for “poor women” is more than that of the “wealthier” “professional” women by a fair amount. The poor will typically have a few children whereas the wealthier may now choose to have none.  Looking at numbers in this manner is important because the full picture obviously needs to be seen in order for more effective policy reform to ever happen. Yet, the idea of “choice” and type of reform needed is something the author and I differ greatly on.

 

The author did a poor job asserting upper class women’s lack of “choice” when it comes to the amount of children they have. The author said some “successful” women would rather get ahead in their career instead of have a family. Thus there is this added layer to the problem of choice outside the unplanned pregnancies of the “poor.” However, there are enough fluff pieces in magazines of late proclaiming women can have it all because “successful” women, as this article called them, typically do have the resources to balance family and work. What I think is more common through is that wealthier women (who want children) are now having children later because they are finishing their schooling and establishing their careers. While the women who don’t have kids, just plain make a choice not to have a child. Because honestly, more affluent people are actually able to plan and decide if they want kids. Whereas an unplanned pregnancy takes the deliberate action of planning out the equation all together. Therefore mentioning the obstacles some women have to plan around in conjunction with the actual issue of poverty just confuses the meaning of choice.

 

The article also touched upon the idea of better child care, which is obviously needed in the US, but not for the reasons mentioned in this article. As mentioned earlier, the more successful women have the money to pay for child care because they have the money/job to do so. Whereas the people with lower paying jobs can’t make ends meet partly due to the way maternity and child care in this country runs. So I think the country would need to change the system, not to cater to the upper class so they procreate more like the author implies, but to increase the mobility of the poor class. Doing this could decrease the amount of people growing up in poverty in order to raise the quality of life for some children. To me, this logic is a better reason to implement more affordable child care rather than the author’s classist concern that poor people are going to outnumber the amount of rich babies born in the US.  

 

Overall, I think this article makes a good point about showing the problem in terms of pregnancy rates being obscured. However, the manner in which the author discussed the “successful” classes “choice” and situation in relation to women in poverty aggravated me.    

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NYTimes Video: City of Endangered Languages

NYTimes Video: City of Endangered Languages | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
New York has long been a city of immigrants, but linguists now consider it a laboratory for studying and preserving languages in rapid decline elsewhere in the world.

 

This is an excellent video for showing the diffusion of languages in the era of migration to major urban centers.  It also shows the factors that lead to the decline of indigenous languages that are on the fringe of the global economy and the importance of language to cultural traditions.   Article related to the video available at: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/29/nyregion/29lost.html?adxnnl=1&adxnnlx=1317132029-I36HNrdg4+dXkbgUQXnK6w


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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 29, 2014 10:25 AM

This article and video were very interesting.  They point out how a city full of immigrants can help preserver a dying language.  The work being done to learn about and preserve these obscure languages is great.  The fact that in New York you will hear language spoken more there than in their home country is astounding to me and very interesting.  This fact is key to preserving these language as they are from areas of the world were the technology level is much lower and less likely to be preserved.  It is also interesting as it shows where people are coming from to live in NY.  The city draws immigrants like a sponge draws in water and this adds to the cultural mosaic that is NY city.

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"It's Not My Mountain Anymore"

"It's Not My Mountain Anymore" | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"First-hand accounts of profound experiences and mountain living in rural Appalachia."

 

This book touches on important themes.  In our rush to strengthen the economic vitality of our urban areas, what are the cultural and environmental impacts within rural areas?  This nostalgic look at a bygone era also exemplifies the concept of "place" as a geographic term, and the deep emotional attachments that it evokes in so many.


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Drug war sparks exodus of affluent Mexicans

Drug war sparks exodus of affluent Mexicans | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Tens of thousands of well-off Mexicans have moved north of the border in a quiet exodus over the past few years, according to local officials, border experts and demographers.

 

The migration from Mexico to the USA has slowed tremendously in the 21st century, but due to the drug violence, the demographic profile of the migrants has changed significantly. 


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Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 2014 1:22 PM

Despite Mexico making improvements to make Mexicans want to stay below the border. The drug trafficking violence does make people want to leave. Tens of thousands of well-off Mexicans, wealthy businessmen and average Mexicans are fleeing Mexico and have moved north of the border in a quiet exodus, and they're being warmly welcomed, unlike the much larger population of illegal immigrants. Mexicans are fleeing cartel wars that have left more than 37,000 Mexicans dead in just 4 years, 

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 29, 2014 2:12 PM

This article is interesting because we were used to seeing poorer immigrants from Mexico looking for work and a new way of life.  However, the more affluent communities are migrating North to the U.S. and legally because of the turmoil of the drug wars in their country.  It is disappointing to see that drugs, violence and murder are pushing away people from their own country

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 3, 2014 1:23 PM

For more affluent Mexicans the ability to migrate north is much easier than for the poor. They have the money and the skills to move into the United States. Also with the open lines of communication and ease of flux with business over the border make moving to the U.S. an excellent way to avoid being caught in the cross fire among drug cartels. For the poor however they are either forced to find work with the cartel or risk being an innocent bystander. It also makes you think about the terminology we use to describe Mexican immigrants, are they not refugees of this drug war?

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AfriGadget

AfriGadget | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

One of the coolest websites ever..."solving everyday problems with African ingenuity." While the developed world lives in a commercial, disposable society, Africans often need to maximize the useablity of all objects.  The solutions they come up with can show students that it is not all doom and gloom in Africa.  


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Cam E's curator insight, March 18, 2014 12:31 PM

This is some really cool stuff! This is a good showcase of human ingenuity. We have no need to create our own helicopters here in the United States in our backyards, but this shows that with the technical know-how, a lot of savings money, and raw supplies, it's entirely possible for anyone to build one. The impressiveness in this article lies in the ability for these individuals to make something extremely complex on their own rather than rely on pre-built, expensive models.

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'Where Children Sleep'

'Where Children Sleep' | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
James Mollison wanted to portray children's diverse worlds. What better way to do so than to photograph their bedrooms?

 

Pictures with the children and the space they inhabit, creates a more personal touch to geographic context for students.  It builds what I call "geographic empathy," which builds on commonalities, instead of just reinforcing stereotypes.   


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Ellen Van Daele's curator insight, March 22, 2015 4:06 PM

This article is very interesting as it shows so much cultural difference by just taking pictures of a child's bedroom. The pictures portray the family's wealth, religion, technological advancements, and parenting style. 

 

When you look at the difference between some of the pictures it is horrible. Some of the children have an abundance of toys, while others don't even have their own room or have to sleep on the ground. It is also interesting to see how some pictures portray the person's lifestyle. Some have a very minimalist room with little luxuries, which can be for religious reasons or personal style. 

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Development and Demographic Changes: "The last woman..".

Development and Demographic Changes: "The last woman..". | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

While global population now is almost reaching 7 billion, mainly to due high birth rates in the developing world, many of the more developed parts of Asia (and elsewhere) are facing shrinking population as fewer women are choosing to marry and have children. 

 

This is a very concrete way to discuss the Demographic Transition Model and population issues around the world.   Cultural values shifting, globalization and demographics all merge together in this issue. 


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Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 20, 2015 2:05 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This article is about how many countries in the world are experiencing a shrinking population in women. In about 83 countries women are going on marriage strikes by refusing to get married. This has caused a severe drop in the amount of women being born. There are predictions that some countries such as Hong Kong will see their last woman born in the year 2798. Many places are now trying to encourage people to have daughters in order to offset the low female composition. 

 

This relates to unit 2 because it deals with population and sex composition. In man countries the female population is dramatically dropping and scientist are predicting women to die out. This also relates to government policies because some places are trying to change the outcome and encourage females. This shows what technology and visualization of populations can do to predict the future. 

Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 2015 7:25 PM

Summary:  This article provides an optimistic outlook on future population growth.  Stating that in wealthy countries and cities with no migration population may even disappear.  

 

Insight:  While this article seems very hard to believe considering what we've learned I think it represents Unit 2 very well because it still analyzes population growth over time based on female wealth.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, March 23, 2015 10:36 PM

This article illustrated how women are becoming more independent and educated. The article tells you that women, "... are preferring the single life, to marital yoke." This leads to the decrease of fertility rates. As women start to focus more on themselves and their career; instead of building a family, they tend to wait on having kids. This trend is occuring especially in Asian countries. Statistics from the UN conclude that if fertility rates don't increase, in 83 countries, women will not have daughters to replace them. For example Hong Kong, it is predicted that 1,000 women will only produce 547 daughters. The drop is now having reseachers predict when populations will see, "...birth of its last women". The female population in Hong will decrease from 3.75 million to 1 million in 25 generations. Researchers say Hong Kong will see the last, "...birth of its last women" in 2798!  The article used a country-year diagram to show what year the countries will see the last birth of its women.

 

This article relates to topics in Unit 2: Population and Migration. It uses a composition model to organize and efficiently show its data. The article and model shows patterns of fertility and prediction and facts of how a change in the lifestyle of women are affecting populations all over the world. Populations are greatly affected to the point where they can become eradicated. The article was really interesting and I was surprised at how short the predicted amount of time is for the last birth of a women in a population. This article also really illustrates and reveal how women play a big part in - what was- a man dominating world.

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TED Talk: Wade Davis on endangered cultures

TED Talks With stunning photos and stories, National Geographic Explorer Wade Davis celebrates the extraordinary diversity of the world's indigenous cultures, which are disappearing from the planet at an alarming rate.

 

This is a fantastic look at indigneous cultures around the world.


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Jesse Gauthier's comment, December 8, 2012 5:21 PM
The first thing that struck my attention in this video was when the speaker said that other cultures teach us about alternative ways to orient ourselves, as humans, on Earth. I never thought about cultures in that sense. When I would look at another culture that is much different from my own culture I just couldn’t comprehend their way of life. But, each culture is just using the Earth’s resources in many various ways, making us not so different in the end. It also makes it much easier to comprehend stranger cultures than our own.
Don Brown Jr's comment, December 10, 2012 10:27 PM
This video brings to light a real dilemma concerning the “plight” of indigenous cultures in the modern world. The forces of globalization has been accelerated by improvements in communication and transportation technologies which have made interaction seem almost instantaneous compared to previous centuries. Yet, this globalized world is changing our notions of significance and attachment to place due to this relative ease of mobility. I have to acknowledge that this is something the indigenous cultures haven’t lost. As Davis clearly explains, the relative isolation that these societies adapted to is becoming increasingly difficulty to maintain, as the forces of global economic integration is binding the world closer to gather (whether people like it or not).
Also another issue that concerns me revolves around the unintended consequences of trying to preserve these cultures. It is possible that we may be accelerating their extinction as external pressure from us may cause these indigenous cultures to become specialized areas which eventually become subject to “exotic” tourism and research, inevitably changing the culture of what was intended to be preserved.
John Caswell's curator insight, February 6, 2014 9:59 AM

Important watch.

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Latinization of Southern Space and Place

Latinization of Southern Space and Place | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Latinization of Southern Space and Place project investigates how the myriad discourses of migration and globalization have become manifest graphically across social spaces and street graphics in the contemporary American South.

 

As local demographics change, so does the cultural landscape and--as evidenced by Alabama writing the toughest anti-immigration law in the U.S.--the political landscape.   


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Racial Profiling on an “Industrial Scale”

Racial Profiling on an “Industrial Scale” | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

FBI Using Census Data to Map and Police Communities by Race: "The ACLU uncovers an FBI program that pairs Census data with 'crude stereotypes' to map ethnic communities."

This is not an impartial article, but the issue of cultural bias and profiling in "objective analysis" raises some serious questions.  What is appropriate to map?  By whom?  For what purposes? 


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GIS student's comment, November 3, 2011 4:24 PM
This article reminds me of what we discussed in the beginning of the semester when we discussed some of the potential problems with GIS. Some of those problems included using maps to and google earth to examine what people are doing with certain certain land that they own. The article discusses how information can be represented in an unconstitutional way. The question is then raised, is it appropriate to map such information and who should be able to see this map? I personally don't believe that the GIS portion should be targeted. When the FBI gathers this information its much different from when they represent the same data with a map.
cookiesrgreat's comment, November 3, 2011 4:29 PM
Reminds me of WWII when they arrested Japanese Americans for potential terrorist acts. The security of this country is A1 however we can not cross over into areas where we become like the countries that are out to destroy us. Lets not rot from the interior. The census data is for the census only. Yes
Don Brown Jr's comment, July 8, 2012 10:27 PM
Their is to much emphasis on reacting to crime and not enough effort put into investing into programs that can prevent it. This lack of understanding in what causes criminal activity makes discrimination much easier. The government should be focusing more on reducing factors that cause crimes such as low education levels and scarce job opportunity if they really wanted have a positive impact.
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Perspectives: Reconsider Columbus Day

Reconsider Columbus Day Presented by Nu Heightz Cinema rethink columbus day reconsider christopher columbus anti columbus day...

 

Without need to adopt one particular ideological perspective, this can be used to discuss distinct cultural perspectives and show how we frame geographic and historic information in our own context.


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Daily Show: The Amazing Racism - Geographical Bigotry

Wyatt Cenac reports on racially charged geographical names in America.

 

Discretion is advised since there is some offensive language in this comedy sketch.  Yet underneath is a serious point about racially insensitive toponyms and their legacy in the United States (recently in the news with Gov. Perry in Texas).  Geographer Mark Monmonier tackles this topic in his book, "From Squaw Tit to Whorehouse Meadow: How Maps Name, Claim, and Inflame."


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NYTimes: One Roof, Three Generations

NYTimes: One Roof, Three Generations | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
In a converted apartment building in Chinatown, five adults and seven children blend traditional values and rituals with modern roles and responsibilities.

 

This article from the New York Times by Sarah Kramer leads to many cultural question worth exploring.  How does migration impact the culture of families?  How is culture maintained and reproduced?  Why is maintaining cultural connection so vital to these families?  


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Why is King Abdullah willing to let Saudi women vote but not drive cars?

Why is King Abdullah willing to let Saudi women vote but not drive cars? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
King Abdullah announced on Sunday that  Saudi women will be allowed to vote and run for office in municipal elections beginning in 2015.

 

Driving a car as simple as it may sound, is a method of enhancing mobility and that means freedom of spatial expression.  This decision to allow women to vote has only demonstrated the cultural constraints of gender roles and how much more progress is needed.  


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James Hobson's curator insight, October 21, 2014 7:04 PM

(Central Asia topic 5 [independent topic])

The decrees made by Saudi Arabia's King regarding women's future rights are being viewed as empty promises. On top of that, this topic is at the convergence of not just political, but also social and religious topics. Political, social, economic, and religious interests are all tugging issues such as women's rights to vote and drive in different directions.

I am surprised this article did not mention something which I had heard before: the Saudi government still does not allow women to drive not only out of social custom, but also because their highways are facing a congestion problem. Giving women drivers licenses could roughly double the number of cars on the already-gridlocked roads, making commuting and transportation even more of a hassle.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 12:51 PM

What I find interesting is that allowing women to vote seems like a big step towards equality but it may be more superficial at addressing the real issue at hand. Women in this country are living with so much constraint, letting them vote may not be the giant step forward it seems to be. There are still cultural and institutional barriers that restraint the freedom and natural rights of women.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 23, 2015 6:40 AM

This decision is absolutely meaningless. Elections matter little in Saudi Arabia. The nation is an Absolute Monarchy. The Kings word on all issues is absolute. On the other hand driving a car, is a much more important symbol of freedom. Allowing women to drive, would give them a sense of mobility. Driving in all most every culture is associated with independence. The car allows you to travel anywhere you want, and avoids the trap of relying on others for transportation. By driving a car, you essentially achieve a certain level of independence. By keeping women from driving, you keep them from achieving independence, and force them to be dependent on the males in their lives.    

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Ground Zero "mosque" opens without protests

Ground Zero "mosque" opens without protests | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The proposed construction of an Islamic center near Ground Zero in New York caused outrage when it was announced two years ago. Now days after the 10-year anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the facility opened last night to no opposition.

 

This is an intriguing swing based on the initial reaction a few years ago about this Islamic cultural center.  Why the fervor 2 years ago?  Why the silence now?  These are worthwhile questions to explore with our students. 


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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 12, 2013 9:47 PM

In my opinion trying to stop the building of this was awful. American prides itself on being the land of the free and that includes freedom of religion regardless of what the horror that took place on 9/11. What was done on 9/11 can not be blamed on a whole population, race, or religion when it was the doing of one group. The rest of these innocent people who were are part of the United States of America were just as affected as the rest of us and it is good to see that this building was allowed to happen in peace.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:49 PM

The outrage over the "Ground Zero Mosque" several years ago was incredibly senseless and entirely discriminatory. This mosque was not on Ground Zero ans was in fact several blocks away, the only reason this became an issue is that select news sites (Fox) built up the issue relying on many Americans' Islamophobia in order to help their ratings and further the political cause of a select few. This is shown to be true as now no one is concerned at all as the story is "old". The actions of our biased media is disgusting at times.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, February 6, 2015 11:06 AM

This was a very interesting development.  Even more interesting was the reaction by many of the public.  On first glance, I guess it is understandable for one to say that it is "odd" developers decided to build a Muslim "mosque" within blocks of the 9/11 attacks.  Then after a little research you should be able to rationalize the situation and put it in perspective.

 

For beginners, it is not a "mosque" but a "community center" of sorts.  Secondly, I would ask critics whether they think a Christian church should be allowed in Oklahoma City, considering Terrorist Mcveigh of the 90's bombed buildings there.  Just because a certain "type" of individual commits a crime does not mean every person associated with that person's ethnicity or religion should be outcasted. One would think that this behavior would have been destroyed after the "mongolian" camps of California in the 1800's and the Japanese internment camps of the 1900's.  It is amazing that America being such a "civilized" country continues to react in such "savage" ways.

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Where are the people of color in national parks?

Where are the people of color in national parks? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
While the American public has grown increasingly diverse in the last decade, black and Hispanic-Americans remain underrepresented in visits to U.S. national parks, according to a new report.

 

What factors help to explain the differences in National park visitations between?  What does this say about the United States from a cultural perspective?


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Why Foreign Students are Hired for Alaskan Fish Processing Jobs

Why Foreign Students are Hired for Alaskan Fish Processing Jobs | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Foreign students come to Alaska under a special cultural exchange visa.

 

Globalization, migration, culture and economics all merge in this issue...good for bringing things together as a "synthesis" piece.  


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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 12:31 PM

I have a mixed opinion on hiring foreign students for this job.  I have many close friends who came to the US as international students, and it can be extremely difficult for them to find jobs. This job provides students with a rare opportunity to work in the American workforce, while earning a decent wage. From the perspective of a foreign student it is a wonderful idea.  If I lived in Alaska I may not have such a sympathetic opinion.  I would probably feel like hiring foreign students for certain positions is taking away jobs from the locals who participate in the community. The article says that locals work in the more skilled positions, and the foreign students work the smaller jobs.  I can understand why the owner would make this move.  The article stated that the student workers work hard and out in long hours and appreciate the opportunity, and come back.  If an appreciates the opportunity they are given and thoroughly enjoys their work, no matter ho w difficult, the end result will be better all around.  As it said, the student was moved to laundry and saw it as a step up. It shows globalization in North America because it is blending the American culture of a hard day's work, earning a wage and being part of the economic community.

David Lizotte's curator insight, January 27, 2015 10:50 AM

I can relate to this article, to a certain degree. When I was studying at RIC, in 2012 or so, I saw a flyer posted in Gaige Hall. It was in regards to working in Alaska on a fish gutting line. Basically the job described in this article, minimum wage, time and a half as an option, but most importantly room and board covered. I thought it to be an excellent opportunity to make some money but also take the money I've made and adventure back to the east coast however I wanted to do so. Apparently I'm not the only one whom was planning such a journey. Long story short, I stayed in Rhode Island... a good decision non the less.

Its clear that the individuals coming to Alaska on the work visa have no other options in there own country. The students are young, want/need money, but also I have a wanderlust and thirst for knowledge of other cultures. This is wonderful and the opportunity is certainly a unique experience. It takes jobs away from citizens, however how many people are truly effected by this? The industry clearly needed workers if it opened its doors to foreign help. If citizens were working this job, the industry wouldn't need more workers from around the globe. 

The only other thing that comes to my mind is that its cheaper to pay non-citizens working through a visa as oppose to enrolling a tax paying  Citizen. If this is the case... such is business.  

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Insecure Space and Precarious Geographies

Insecure Space and Precarious Geographies | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is an intriguing look into security, terrorism, politics and the city.  The most interesting places are often the most unconventional and places like Jerusalem with it's geopolitical importance, makes for a very compelling urban landscape. 


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Which country has the smallest gender gap?

Which country has the smallest gender gap? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
How narrow is the gender gap in the United States compared to some other countries? 

 

This article is good for analyzing global cultural, economic and political patterns, especially within a gender unit.


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