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N. Koreans weeping over death of Kim Jong-il

Footage taken from North Korean state media. Follow https://twitter.com/Alex_Ogle for photos and news updates.

 

This is intriguing on many levels. One, with the overwhelming state propaganda that the North Koreans have grown up with, this is the culmination of that secularized catechism. Kim Jong-Il has been deified and they are acting accordingly. I don't believe that all North Koreans feel that way, which leads to my second reason for posting this link: the biased nature of state-run media in North Korea and the ideological impact that has on the population. What impact do state-run media have on local populations and the political landscape? How might it influence you?


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JR McKenzie's comment, January 30, 2012 2:45 PM
I was listening to the news and they reported that they were actually arresting people for not crying enough....
Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 2014 11:14 AM

At the time of Kim Jong-il's death I was very interested in North Korea and followed the matter closely. It's absolutely true that he and his father are made out to be deities in the country, but of course not everyone truly believes it. Though the effect still remains the same, as it's something that they likely won't talk about in their day to day life for fear of punishment. Insults to either Kim il Sung or Kim Jong Il are heavy crimes in North Korea, and it's likely that putting on a spectacle such as this would do good to keep citizen's standing with the military in a good position.

Angelica Halsey. Lily Garcia's curator insight, October 28, 2014 12:43 PM

The topic of this article is religion. This article is religion because they believe that Kim Jong-il is like god, they  worship him and praise him for everything plus they believe that he is perfect.  This is a big loss for North Koreans because Kim Jong-il was a main aspect of daily life. This article describes the sadness and remorse that North Koreans are feeling because of the death of their great leader. 

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A Tit for Tat: A Spratly Island Spat!

If you haven't yet discovered http://www.plaidavenger.com/ I recommend exploring it (numerous World Regional resources). You'll find its brand of geography has a whole lot of personality; you'll decide soon enough whether that personality works for your classroom.  This particular 'plaidcast' discussion focuses on political geography, the Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ), and the strategic importance of overseas exclaves using the Spratly Island example in the South China Sea.

Minor correction to video: Territorial waters only extend 12 miles offshore, not the 200 miles of the exclusive economic zone. 


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:30 PM

This is definitely an interesting tool to use in the classroom. But it also gives the viewer an animated expression of geographic topics. The EEZ that make countries fight over small useless islands because it allows for access to profitable seas. I like this goofy host and the way he takes on serious topics in a way that makes them engaging for people who would otherwise be bored when just reading about it in a text book.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 17, 2014 8:08 PM

I truly believe that if a World War III erupts, it will solely be the fault of China. China isn't contempt with the current land it possesses. As one of the world's super power, China is trying to expand its territory to become a holder of the global economy. Not solely on China, but countries that lie on the South China Sea are claiming the scattered island that lies in the middle of the sea. But the problem comes with the definition of how much land outside of a country can a country possess? If China were to possess this land, what would happen to all of the natives?

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 4:06 PM

what i would like to know about in relation to this would be what the people of these islands see themselves as. also i think that one of the reasons these countries especially china wants these islands is because it would expand their territory in the ocean (200 miles off the coast) that they would now own.

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Hungary Destroys Monsanto GMO Corn Fields

Hungary Destroys Monsanto GMO Corn Fields | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Hungary has taken a stand against biotech giant Monsanto and genetic modification by destroying 1000 acres of maize grown with genetically modified seeds.

 

Peru and Hungary have both banned GMOs. What are the reasons that many are critical of GMOs? What should the government's role be in agriculture and food systems? Are bio-tech companies too strong?


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Courtney Holbert's curator insight, February 3, 2013 10:57 PM

With Monsanto having such a large political power, this is very interesting tat Hungary took a stand. 

Maria Bustamante's comment, February 22, 2013 11:56 AM
This article is about countries that are taking a stand against the company Monsanto. Many people in those countries are critical against the use of GMOs because they're not sure about how the genetic engineering will affect the crops. Already GMOs have had negative effects. The use of GMOs reduces the variety between the seeds. Not only that but the farmers are no longer getting the money the deserve for their hard work and they are not allowed to save their seeds. The government should have little control over the agriculture and what they decide to plant. They should take more precautions against the GMOs and they should make sure that the food system companies in charge of checking the safety food should not have a connection to the very food companies they are supposed to be condemning. Bio-tech companies are getting too strong because they're gaining too much control of the fields due to the patents they hold on their GMOs. This is dangerous because they could end up having a monopoly on the franchise and when they due if something happens to their crops it will happen to all the crops. It will be, for lack of a better word, very bad.
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The role of social networking in the Arab Spring

The role of social networking in the Arab Spring | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
A case study for our World Development text book...

 

How useful was digital technology, particularly social networking sites, to democracy protesters in Tunisia and Egypt?  How important are the democracy protests in the Middle East and North Africa to world development?  Social media has fundamentally changed the cultural and political paradigms. 


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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 1, 2014 9:40 PM

While we sit here on Facebook and Twitter for a way to connect with friends, share photos of our vacations or follow our favorite celebrities every move places in North Africa and some of the Middle East are using social media to change their country.  In countries like Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt people have used these social media sites to disperse information to the general public.  Where a rally will be held, a map of where police forces will be located, and what to do in the event teargas is used are all topics for discussion on social media.  With the use of these websites a larger group of people are able to take part in the overthrow of the government.  With leaders restricting the access to the web even more people were intrigued to join the protests.  When people can't follow along on the internet the events they decided to go take part in the events themselves.  With the use of these social media websites the Arab Spring in these areas was able to be as successful as it was.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 27, 2015 5:27 PM

I think it is important that technology plays a role in these revolutions. Before, if a revolution happened, the dictator could just silence its population. Now the population has things like Facebook and Twitter to mobilize their plans of attack for meeting places and advice about how to confront the government. As such, the power of the citizens has grown and according to the article some argue it was this power that made the government officials in Egypt and Tunisia stand down. I tend to agree since the coverage of the event helped increase the size of the demonstrations.  

 

I love that these protests for democracy are being led by the citizens. Since the citizens actually want this type of government, there is actually a chance that this might  be what the country needs. As you mentioned during the Solar Diem video, what works for one society may not translate to another. The author of this piece is more than likely from a western democracy given how the author thinks "democratic change offers the only solution"  to issues like poverty and internal strife within "Arab" countries. Yet, that isn't the case in the Middle East. By forcing a democratic revolution on Iraq,  the region is more destabilized than it was under the harsh command of Saddam Hussein. As you mentioned in class, Iraq needed a dictator like Hussein to keep peace though. So as helpful as technology might be  for democratic revolutions, democratic revolution might not be the answer to every countries problems.

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 26, 2015 2:46 PM

The Arab Spring owes its origins to the mass use of social media websites to get organized and launch the protests that ultimately overthrew several dictators in the region. Social media was crucial for the movement to spread like wild fire, as young people all over North Africa and the Middle East banded together against the tyranny of their governments. Protests broke out in every capital of the region, noticeably in Cairo, where the protests briefly transcended ethnic and religious disputes in the name of freedom for all. Although the movement has long since fizzled out in the face of increased violence, instability, and the lack of a consensus among protesters as to what their next move should be, the Arab Spring served as a powerful example as to extent of which the Internet will now play in global affairs. It is a powerful tool that has completely revolutionized the way we live our everyday lives, and it has completely changed the game for much of North Africa and the Middle East.

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Political Geography: Borders

Political Geography: Borders | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The American-Canadian border, famously said to run straight across the 49th parallel for hundreds of miles, is neither straight nor along the 49th parallel.

 

This is a good historical way to discuss the stages of border creation, especially demarcation and delimitation.  The history of where to place a border, as the border itself, is not so straight forward.   


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Top 10 Reasons Alabama’s New Immigration Law Is a Disaster for Agriculture

Top 10 Reasons Alabama’s New Immigration Law Is a Disaster for Agriculture | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Alabama’s new immigration law, H.B. 56, is already devastating the state’s agricultural sector."

 

Does teaching agriculture have to be boring?  This particular issue is an excellent current topic that combines politics, culture and demographics within agriculture.   

 


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Mac steel's comment, March 8, 2013 10:09 AM
Technoloy
Valorie Morgan's curator insight, November 7, 2013 10:13 AM

The new immigration laws have caused farmers to cut back on crops due to low empolyment rate. The immgrants that were currently working for farmers, ran off in fear of being captured. I'm against this law, I see exactly where the farmers are coming from. I believe these laws are pointless, it's just people trying to make an honest buck in the hot sun. Alabama is losing a great deal of agriculture due to this new law. Even though, they say its againast the law. I don't see the point. Why be so hard on these farmer??

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 12:08 AM

This article shows how important it is to follow the natural way of agriculture. With the new laws in Alabama being passed it now allows people to grow crops in an unnatural way which is devastating predicament to the agricultural world. 

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Cyprus, political divisions and protests

Cypriots join the global protest movement to heal their divisions...

 

Cyprus has a long history of violence between Greek and Turkish Cypriots, so the buffer zone protest which follows the #occupy model, has greater political, ethnic, historical and geographic implications.  Will this grassroots effort open a political dialogue to resolve the island’s divisions?  Here is the group's Facebook page.  The video is long, but the first few minutes are especially relevant with a nice overview. 


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NPR: In Arab States, It's Good To Be The King

NPR: In Arab States, It's Good To Be The King | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The past year has seen enormous change and political unrest across the Arab world. But the region's revolutionary wave has largely bypassed Middle East monarchies."


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After Alabama Immigration Law, Few Americans Taking Immigrants' Work

After Alabama Immigration Law, Few Americans Taking Immigrants' Work | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
ONEONTA, Ala. -- Potato farmer Keith Smith saw most of his immigrant workers leave after Alabama's tough immigration law took effect, so he hired Americans.

 

Geography is all about the interconnected of themes and places.  This issue in Alabama is displaying these interconnections quite vividly.  Economics, immigration, culture, politics and agriculture are intensely intertwined in this issue.   


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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 29, 2014 9:57 AM

This is another article that highlights the skill deficit in this country.  People seem to be afraid of doing hard work and would rather do nothing then work hard to learn this skill.  If it were a choice between no job and this type of job people would take the jobs but the third choice of unemployment payments makes people who might do these jobs decide not to.  As long as they are paid more to not work then work, they will not do the jobs that need workers.  The farmer made a good point that a skilled picker can make $200-$300 a day but an unskilled worker doing the job makes only $24 a day.  The work ethic of this country needs to be changed, young people today do not want to work hard or put in the effort.  When farmers can no longer get workers how long will it be before there is a food problem as well as a worker problem in this country.  It is possible to make a good living doing these types of jobs but not as long as people feel the work is beneath them or they are unwilling to do the hard manual labor required to do the job well.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, January 28, 2015 12:26 PM

i see this as a very good law. America is on the verge of recovering from an economic recession and the United States can benefit from every job given to a natural born american citizen. i do see the problems that a  farmer can have such as receiving a decline in profits if they must pay more for the product. in the article the farmers also say that Americans just do not work like seasoned Hispanics and production is way down. another looming problem that the Americans have is that they are slow, and want to call it a day after lunch, and expect to get paid more. 

Kendra King's curator insight, February 2, 2015 5:36 PM

As the title implies, this is about how Americans are not cut out for doing intensive farming jobs because the workers just quit quickly. A few politicians mentioned in the story, Governor Robert Bentley and Senator Scott Beason, said they received thank you messages from constituents who found work. This was supposed to be evidence of Americans benefitting from jobs that immigrants took, but I would love to know how many of those people actually stayed with the job. Furthermore, I find it a bit too suspicious that none of the people wanted to speak with the press as the author mentioned or that the names just weren’t given. I am more inclined to believe the owners of the famers mentioned in the article, who said they can’t keep Americans on their site happy due to lack of pay and benefits. Mind you now it wasn’t just one owner who said this either. I think this is telling as well because the owners are the individuals who best know the industry as they work it every day.

 

From the farmers perspective the new law is now a huge problem that could also affected consumers. They lost steady “Hispanics with experience,” who they knew could handle the work. For some farmers, according to the article, has made it so the produce is left on the vine rotting because it isn’t picked. So in essence, what the Arizona law just did was harm agriculture and the buyers too because if enough of that food perishes the price will go up. Now I can understand a state being aggravated over illegal immigration (it is a serious problem that is nowhere close to being solved), but to pass a law with these kinds of economic ramifications isn’t really helping the situation much either. As much as people hate to admit it, our economy needs immigrants from Mexico for our agriculture sector to work. It is just a little known fact.

 

The new law isn’t the only law at issue in this article. Connie Horner of Georgia tried to legally hire workers through the government’s visa program. She soon found it is too costly for her to do and too time consuming, so instead Ms. Horner is turning to machines. The fact that visas are that hard to attain for workers is also part of the reason the immigrants come illegally. Rather than spending more money to watch the boarder how about the government figure out a way for the bureaucracy of the immigration process to move quicker. This isn’t an issue of 2011 either when the article was written. Listening to the news, I have heard farmers complain about the visa program for years. No wonder immigrants come over illegally and then citizens get angry at these people. Really, American’s should be more annoyed with their government’s ineffective stance on boarder control. 

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NYTimes: In Praise of Borders

NYTimes: In Praise of Borders | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
A new series explores the mysteries that maps and borders can hide - and reveal.

 

This is brimming with potential for a unit on political geography and a discussion of borders.  The Google Earth embedded link to the Belgian/Dutch town of Baarle is especially useful. 


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Miles Gibson's curator insight, February 14, 2015 9:45 AM

Unit 4 political geography 

This picture explains how political boundaries can interfere and neglect cultural and linguistic boundaries. This shows the political and cultural boundaries of the Belgian and Dutch limberg where there is much dispute of cultural hearths and other entities of culture.

This article relates to unit 4 because it shows how borders dawn by states do not always coincide with the nation's  intentions and therefore lack the respect of many nations and doubt their own enhancement as an ethnic nation. This overall relates to unit 4.

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NYTimes: Wall Street Protest Shows Power of Place

NYTimes: Wall Street Protest Shows Power of Place | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Occupy Wall Street is a potent reminder of the ancient civic ideal of public space, and how far we have drifted from it in the modern era.

 

"Imagine Zuccotti Park, one protester told me, as a Venn diagram of characters representing disparate political and economic disenchantments. The park is where their grievances overlap. It’s literally common ground."  Posted in many sites, but since this article treats the important of place as its central point, it merits reposting.  This article also situates the current protests within a deeper historical context as so many movements have 'taken to the streets.'  


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NYTimes: Russian Anger Grows Over Chechnya Subsidies

NYTimes: Russian Anger Grows Over Chechnya Subsidies | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Resentment over the lavish federal subsidies paid to Chechnya and other regions in the North Caucasus could become a liability for Prime Minister Vladimir V. Putin of Russia.

 

Multi-ethnic states, political geography and Russia's geopolitical complexities. 


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 20, 2013 3:39 PM

The article brings back memories of this past year and the Boston Marathon where the two bombers were found out to be from the Chechen region.  Due to social networks and word of mouth, many people jumped to assume that the attack was because of "the Russians".  Little was known about Chechnya and the people within the area, but it showed that in America at least, there was quite a bit of ignorance and assumption floating around.  Even political figures and in news reports there was confusion of the exact boundaries and ethnic backgrounds that the region possessed.  It shows the media gives people what they want to hear, and the listeners are seldom to do their own research to understand the truth.

Russia and its surrounding region has constantly been changing since the fall of the Soviet Union.  New countries form and more ethnicities arise constantly and with all these new developments form even newer confusion.  Many of these areas intertwine various languages, religions, cultures, and at times putting a barrier between them is nearly impossible.  As reports unravelled, they showed actual conflict between Chechnya and those of the Russian capital, Moscow.  There had been hostage situations and terrorist plots carried out by people suspected to be from the Chechen region and even the Russian president Vladimir Putin had grown angry about being apart of Chechnya.  With all these events and learnings, it shows that some countries still have people and areas within its boundaries that have little known about them.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 6, 2014 8:56 PM

Vladimir Putin was once a symbol of efficiency in Russia, but now that tensions are growing due to the subsidies that are being paid to Chechnya. As the article states, Putin's policies are starting to seem like a dead end and will only get more expensive as time goes on.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 12:23 PM

We don't usually hear about Chechnya subsidies usually it has to do with growing tensions or terrorism. In Russia there are so many ethnic and political divisions that it make sense the Russians feel allegiance to their ethnic group rather than Russia and there for when the government subsidizes Chechnya they see it as Russia subsidizing a population that really isn't "Russian".

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Palestine is but one of many aspiring to the United Nations

Palestine is but one of many aspiring to the United Nations | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Admission to the General Assembly of the UN is not open to all. The Palestinian Territories are just one of several regions without a seat at the world's top table.

 

Palestine's bid for statehood and international recognition is making the political geography definition for state all the more relevant?  What is a state and what is not?  What function does UN membership play in the process of statehood and sovereignty?


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Kendra King's curator insight, May 3, 2015 2:19 AM

In order to be recognized as a sovereign entity from the UN the country must have the full vote of the UN acknowledging that the state exists. However, given the set up of the security counsel, that makes becoming a state really hard. Currently, China & Russia oppose Europe and the United States' desires and vice versa. As the article shows, the  countries seeking statehood outside of Palestinian all seem to have one member of the team on board, but not the other. As such, I don't foresee recognition in the future anytime soon.

 

The whole limbo status, is astonishing to be. I find it weird that a place, like Palestine, can have a flag and a national language, and many other elements of most countries, but not be a country as the article mentioned. From this angel, it amperes international acceptance is the most important factor. This made me wonder, even if the security counsel did have similar interests would accepting any of the nations in would be a good idea? Many of the countries that want to be admitted are from the former soviet union block, which as mentioned in class is often shattering among ethnic groups. However, due to all of the different ethnicity and people within the region, how many smaller countries should be carved out when these were accepted? Also, at what point does this just create further instability?

 

As much as I don't agree with the UN security counsel excluding the voices of the developing world, the current set up does block hastily adding new countries to the world. Given the present too many new nations could set in unstable regions, this might be better for the world. Or I could be wrong because skirmishes could continue until someone recognizes a party. Since I don't want to keep play the what if game, I am just going to end by saying that if the security counsel is ever change, the geopolitical consequences would need to be analyzed heavily. This situation alone is case and point.     

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Corruption versus human development

Corruption versus human development | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Which countries/regions struggle the most with corruption in their political institutions?  Which countries/regions struggle with development?  Why does corruption seem to be correlated with development? 


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 4:40 PM

It seems that New Zealand is the country to live in because it has less corruption. But one day the corruption will start and that would be the country no one would like to be living in. the United States is also a great place to live in but in certain areas. That goes for New Zealand also. But what I am curious why in other countries there is so much corruption in all these other countries like Congo and Afghanistan. Maybe that one day will change.

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A Keyhole into Burma

A Keyhole into Burma | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
On my last afternoon in Bagan, I went in search of a meal that would serve as both lunch and dinner, before boarding my flight...

 

As a notoriously closed society, glimpses into Burma become all the more important as Burma shows signs of (possibly) opening up politically for the first time in decades.


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Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 2014 12:23 PM

Yet another collection of pictures I'm scooping, but this time there's over 100 of them! Getting a western view into the insulated society of Burma is a rare opportunity, this shows some interesting pastimes such as Water buffalo surfing, but also things of major cultural significance, such as the importance of Buddhism.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 4:41 PM

This article depicts the differences and the little things that we in the USA take for granted for instance in this case it is a cd that is known as the "Western" type of misc and mass media culture that has been transported in this Burmese society.  It truly is the little things such as the Robbie Williams CD that is being depicted as not only the Western musical society but also being grouped with Bob Marley songs that would depict from the Burmese translation the Western society. And even though the people in this society don't know what the lyrics mean they can still be moved by the melody.  

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 10:51 PM

I found the fact that the government of Burma banned certain music, it seems like an odd thing to refuse the people of the country, but we forget that it is the small things that we take for granted in the US, that are seen as luxuries in other parts of the world and that is an interesting idea to wrap your mind around.

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Parag Khanna maps the future of countries

TED Talks Many people think the lines on the map no longer matter, but Parag Khanna says they do. Using maps of the past and present, he explains the root causes of border conflicts worldwide and proposes simple yet cunning solutions for each.

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Dovid's curator insight, October 17, 2013 8:24 AM

Move on from border conflicts by using infrastructure that allows for the economic independence of every region.  

Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, November 8, 2013 9:25 AM

This TED talk focuses on political geography, specifically, borders of the past and the present.  Parag Khanna proves that borders matter because they explain conflicts between spaces that made these spaces sovereign nation-states and countries.  Borders explain who was in power at certain times in history and what resources and materials were sought after at that particular time.  With 200 countries represented on a political map today, the borders separating all of these countries were formed for particular reasons.

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Blueseed: Business' New "Spatial Fix"

Blueseed: Business' New "Spatial Fix" | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Many site outsourcing as a way in which global corporatations are seeking to avoid the typical economic limitations that have been imposed on job production based on geography.  Some refer to it as a 'spatial fix,' a way to get around the high cost of workers in the developed world being reworking how business gets done.  

 

This takes that to an entirely different level.  The benefits of agglomeration and collaboration help to explain the importance of Silicon Valley.  Entrepreneurs from other countries do not all have access to a comparable location with a high concentration of intellectually driven enterprises that amplify their impacts.  The Blueseed Project intents to, in essence create a floating city in international waters (just off the coast of California) that is outside of U.S. governmental jurisdiction, but easily accessible for Silicon Valley executives.   

 

More questions than answers arise from this project.  How are economic restructurings altering governance?  Are borders becoming less or more important with increased technological advances?  Would this be a benefit to developing world economies or strengthen the Silicon Valley's economic importance in research and development?     


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Latin American integration: Peaks and troughs

Latin American integration: Peaks and troughs | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

The financial crisis surrounding the Euro has led many to feel that supranational organizations and regional coalitions are more trouble than they are worth.  The OAS (Organization of American States-which the USA is a part of) may dissolve and the CELAC might be its successor.  The CELAC's (Community of Latin American and Caribbean States) emergence shows that the United States "is declining in a region it once called its 'backyard.'"  Spain is also diminishing in influence among its former colonies are forging new economic and political ties while Mexico and Brazil are exerting more regional influence. 


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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 21, 2013 10:04 PM

The United States influence is delining in an area it called "its back yard". Along the financial crisis causing this, it has also begun to declin Spains influence in there former colonies as well. I think this could be a good thing as far these areas finally getting out from under other countires control even though they have been free for so long. But it could be bad because know that they are doing things on their own what will they do   

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Redrawing the United States of America

Redrawing the United States of America | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Borders are all-important imaginary lines that affect our lives in myriad ways. They define in a very literal sense where we live, who we call neighbors, and how we are governed. But in a world defined by instantaneous communications and commutes that can just as easily involve airports as train stations, many borders are relics of a bygone era."

 

Most semesters I have students redraw the United States map into regions and it is a productive session to understand the concepts of region, place and culture.  This article echoes the proposal of geographer Etzel Pearcy to divide the country into 38 states.  This comes from an excellent blog about density: http://persquaremile.com/  


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How did Pakistan get it's name?

How did Pakistan get it's name? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The name of the country Pakistan has a fascinating history - it is essentially an acronym!  Prior to 1947, the country now known as Pakistan was a British colony. In 1947 the United Kingdom granted independence to the region under a new name, Pakistan. The name had been developed by a group of students at Cambridge University who issued a pamphlet in 1933 called Now or Never."

 

In a country with such great ethnic divisions, a common religion is a powerful nationalizing force.  As the capital city of Islamabad's toponym powerfully states (the house or abode of Islam), religion remains an important element of national identity for Pakistanis.   


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 28, 2015 3:15 PM

Pakistan is simply abbreviated from it's nations or nations that border Pakistan. P stands for Punjab, A stands for Afghania, K stands for Kashmir, I stands for Iran, S stands for Singh, T stands for Tukharistan, A stands for Afghanistan. However, there is no "N." Instead we classified the last letter as Balochistan but because "stan" is the Persian pronunciation for "country." Pakistan decided to abbreviate "N" as a silent so they can successfully abbreviate "Pakistan" instead of "Pakista."

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, November 9, 2015 3:03 PM

Re-scooped from Professor Dixon, primarily for how ridiculous it is. Most of us figured there was some decent reason (like the neighboring 'Stan's) for why  and how Pakistan got its name. Nope, there really wasn't any good reason to name it Pakistan, it is an acronym. One that makes absolutely no sense whatsoever.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 6:47 PM
Until reading this, I thought this was another country that had a "stan" name just like the rest. I never knew that Pakistan received it's makeshift name my a bunch Cambridge University students. It is composed of lands taken from homelands: Punjab, Afghania,, Kashmir, Iran , Sindh, Tukharistan, Afghanistan, and balochistaN.
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
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NPR: Saudi Women Drive Change Despite Mixed Signals

Authorities continue to go after women who flout Saudi Arabia's ban on female drivers, but King Abdullah has pledged to give women more political power in the coming years.

 

This article focuses on public space and differentiated cultural norms that created deeply gendered spaces that are onerous to navigate. Gender, Place and Culture are all intertwined.   


Via Seth Dixon
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Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
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Countries must plan for climate refugees

Countries must plan for climate refugees | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The world's governments and relief agencies need to plan now to resettle millions of people expected to be displaced by climate change, an international panel of experts said on...

Climate change and political geography should merge, but unfortunately not in this way. 


Via Cathryn Wellner, Seth Dixon
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Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
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NYTimes: Battles to Shape Maps, and Congress, Go to Courts

NYTimes: Battles to Shape Maps, and Congress, Go to Courts | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The once-a-decade process of drawing Congressional districts has prompted lawsuits in more than half the states over issues like partisan gerrymandering and accusations of discrimination.

Via Seth Dixon
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Anneli's curator insight, November 9, 2014 8:12 PM

EXTRA CREDIT 

Gerrymandering- manipulating the boundaries of an electoral constituency to favor one party or class. 

 

This article talks about many lawsuits related to redistricting, have been put against  in more than half the states, asking judges to decide whether or not new maps take "partisan gerrymandering too far or discriminate against minority voters."

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
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Public Space, Private Rules: The Legal Netherworld of Occupy Wall Street

Public Space, Private Rules: The Legal Netherworld of Occupy Wall Street | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Had the protest begun almost anywhere else in New York City, it almost certainly would have been shut down far sooner.

 

While I'm sure we have readers across the political spectrum, the spatial component to this movement is undeniably a "teaching moment."  Occupy symbolically laden space to strengthen your discursive case?  This is a classic strategy (think Tiananmen Square and Tahrir Square for starters).  The actual place occupied is privately owned, and ironically can therefore function as a public place of protest more effectively.  What will you discuss?  


Via Seth Dixon
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A Burmese spring?

A Burmese spring? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"THE recent news from Myanmar, that beautiful, blighted land formerly known as Burma, has offered an all-too-rare cause for optimism." 


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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 8, 2014 12:10 PM

This is interesting and hopefully turns out to be a good thing for Myanmar.  After being under so much oppression from not only its own government but from other countries as well.  Having this improved more relaxed government that works more for the people is a definite improvement for Myanmar.  Standing up to China about closing the dam because the people that live in Myanmar aren't benefiting from it and are still poor.  Stepping up and listening to the people that live in the country and standing up to others that are taking advantage of the country is a huge step in the right direction on improving the lives of those in the country.