AP Human Geography Education
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Map as Art

Map as Art | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
There are many amazing examples of artists who turn to cartography and geography for inspiration. Whether through the lens of a camera, paint, ...

 

This series of cartographically-inspired art works changes how we look at maps.  Some of these artists also make us think of places that are on the Earth as explicitly "mappable" features.  I think the Google Maps push-pin in the city center is my favorite.  Which do you prefer? 

 

Tags: art, mapping, place, cartography. 


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GeoMapGames's curator insight, March 4, 2014 12:47 AM

Amazing map art! I like Google Maps push-pin in the city center :)
Which do you prefer?  #geomapgames

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Making National Geographic Maps

Making National Geographic Maps | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This map of Cuba, National Geographic's first map of Cuba in over 100 years, has an incredible backstory. 

 

While touring the National Geographic headquarters, the cartographer Juan Valdés (pictured here with me) told me the story of his early days living in Cuba before Castro,  Pictured is one of his 36 meticulous drafts produced to create this cartographic masterpiece of his home country.  To hear it in his own words, embedded in this link is a 18 minute video of his talk at National Geographic on Cuba and the production of the map.  The last 7 minutes are especially helpful for mapping students to see all the decisions and stages involved in creating a professional reference map.

 

Tags: cartography, mapping, National Geographic, Latin America, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples.


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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 9:54 PM

For starters, these pictures were fascinating to look at. It was amazing to see how much time and effort goes in making just one map. The video was informative and really gives you an idea of the unique process that is being done. The pictures fascinated me the most though. You could just tell just by looking at the pictures that they take what they do seriously. Also, you can tell that they are passionate about what they do. You can especially tell that you yourself had a great time and that you were really interested in what was going on. It is really awesome that National Geographic interviewed you about your visit. In the video, it was nice that he started off with some background information about Cuba and the special times that he shared with his father that made him go into cartography. Overall, the pictures and the video were really a sight to see.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 11, 2015 10:11 PM

This was a great presentation. I cant imagine how long it must take to make an accurate map, especially when these cartographers are so passionate about their work and their craft.  You can tell that to be a cartographer, you must be extremely passionate and dedicated to your craft.

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, April 16, 2015 4:58 PM

It's absolutely crazy to be that Juan Valdes had up to thirty-six different drafts of the map of Cuba, just to come up with the one, most accurate map of the country. When I see maps, I never think of how long it must have taken to get it exactly the way it is to be the most accurate map possible.  It also makes me wonder how completely accurate our maps are, because when comparing multiple, you can see slight differences.

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Manifest Destiny in 141 Maps

Manifest Destiny in 141 Maps | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This data visualization project is a great way to demonstrate the geographic expansion of the United States.  This is much more interactive than the typical time lapse video since you can scroll through the maps and explore each map through the interactive features. 

 

Tags: historical, USA, visualization, mapping.


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 5, 2012 11:24 AM
I really like the display of these changes in our country throughout the years. It's a great way of showing centuries of change into something easy to understand. This would help young students in a social studies class for sure.
Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 6, 2012 10:35 PM
i LOVE THIS! I can see this being such a valuable tool to use in a classroom. Students get the visual and written representation. Having the visual changes that took place in the United States is a better way to present to the students instead of them just reading a book. Will definitely save this article for future reference.
benjamin costello's curator insight, April 29, 2015 6:36 PM

This is great idea. I wonder if I can use something like this for my project.

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Ingrid Dabringer’s Map Paintings: Finding Whimsy in Geography

Ingrid Dabringer’s Map Paintings: Finding Whimsy in Geography | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is a great gallery of clever artwork that puts the "art" in cartography (The Earth without art is just "eh"). 


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United States MapMaker Kit

United States MapMaker Kit | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
MapMaker Kit. Download, print, and assemble maps of the United States in a variety of sizes. The mega map occupies a large wall, or can be used on the floor.

 

Have you every wanted to create a giant map but aren't sure if you can logistically pull it off?  The National Geographic's MapMaker kit is just that, a kit for you to create wall maps from a standard printer and tile them together.  The assembly itself is a great spatial thinking and fun exercise for students (and there are large world maps as well). 

 

Tags: NationalGeographic, cartography, mapping, K12.


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Arezza Network's comment, October 19, 2012 9:20 AM
#Geography is key to shaping the #culture of a community
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Mapping functional distance: the communte

Mapping functional distance: the communte | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

As described by Manu Fernandez, "MySociety developed this project that perfectly illustrates the utility of georeferenced data. Mapumental tool displays the travel time to reach a certain point from anywhere in the city, thereby helping to understand the temporal distance mobility, a much more useful and practical information than just physical distance."

 

This type of mapping shows the Space-Time Compression as well as the unevenness of that compression.  Why are some areas 'functionally closer?'  What makes some places 'functionally farther apart?'   How do technology, density and infrastructure influence this phenomenon?


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juanchosierrar's comment, December 19, 2011 5:10 AM
Excellent application of isochronism in geomarketing studies have great use with them we know the areas of influence at 5, 10 or 15 min.

This tool in combination with demographic data can be known potential areas of my future clients.

Currently working with a company in which we develop these products. I leave you some examples of isochrones lins.

http://cartoo.dyndns.org/

http://cabsa.wordpress.com/2011/11/24/geomarketing-areas-de-influencia-con-winab/

adeu
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 27, 2013 10:19 PM

This type of mapping shows the Space-Time Compression as well as the unevenness of that compression.  Why are some areas 'functionally closer?'  What makes some places 'functionally farther apart?'   How do technology, density and infrastructure influence this phenomenon?

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Global data geovisualized

Global data geovisualized | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Learn about the world by changing the familiar map. Select a subject from the top menu and watch the map resize. A countrys total area no longer represents land mass, but items relevant to the subject (i.e.

 

The geovisualization in this interactive map is outstanding (translation: I could play with this all day).  This displayed map shows the destination countries for migrants, with links to the data and information to read up on the topic.  Truly impressive.   For the live link, see: http://show.mappingworlds.com//world/?lang=EN


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Making a Topographic Profile

Demonstration on how to make a topographic profile for an Earth Science Lab.

 

This is an excellent way to teach elevation, landforms and cartography without high-tech tools.  Not a quick project, but very good for a class with a large physical geography component.   


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Religious Geography of the United States

Religious Geography of the United States | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

A set of 2000 census maps that focus on religion in the United States.  Even in secular societies, religion can play an important role within society, both culturally and politically.  Include are links to many more religious maps.  


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Rebecca!Morgan Geography's curator insight, November 21, 2013 1:30 PM
Geography- these maps show the diverse religions and the distribution of them.
Andrew and Tom's curator insight, November 25, 2013 3:11 PM

This map shows the consentration of religion in the US and how ut mainly is in the south.

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Migration in America - Forbes

Migration in America - Forbes | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
More people left Phoenix in 2009 than came. The map above visualizes moves to and from Phoenix; counties that took more migrants than they sent are linked with red lines. Counties that sent more migrants than they took are linked with blue lines.

 

I've sent this link out before, but Forbes now has four articles attached to interactive mapping tool that analyze the data (including one by geographer Michael Conzen).  Also the new data has been added and the visualization has also been improved...very cool features with tremendous amounts of teaching applications. 


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Rachael Johns's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:21 AM

In this day and age we see more people migrating then staying. People move for numerous things, a trend that causes a lot of migration is when people retire they move to southern Florida. They get tons of sun rays and meet a lot of people their age there. Another reason people migrate is for jobs. If their job tells them they have to move across state they do which causes more migration. ~R.J~

AmandaWilhiteee's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:25 AM

The map is what originally attracted me to this article, but I must admit that the actual article was very interesting. Lots of the moves were from Phoenix, Arizona. Why people moved from Phoenix was not information that was disclosed in the article, but because of that, it made me wonder and want to learn more about this topic. AW :)

Nolan Walters's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:30 AM

I've seen something like this before.  More people leaving a location than entering it.  Something may have caused them to move, Push and Pull factors are both in this.  Job opportunities or the extreme heat of Phoenix may have caused them to leave.  It shows that most people went to the Northeast, where it is cooler and has more people.

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xkcd: Map Projections

xkcd: Map Projections | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Geo-geek humor -- A cartoon strip on the projector in the 3 minutes before class can be a good thing.  I'm a Robinson. 


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Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 10, 2012 11:06 AM
I feel the Robinson map is a closest representation of the world that is translated onto a 2-D map. All of the land masses and oceans look to be accurate without flattening the map completely and still having a curvature to it; which is more of a representation of the globe.
Emily Bian's curator insight, September 28, 2014 8:36 PM

This cartoon strip shows the different types of map projections, and has a caption of what your personality is like if you like the map projection.

I thought this was really funny, especially the caption for the Peters Projection. I'm a Robinson for sure, because I just like the way it looks. I think all the different types of maps are good and useful in their own way, even the Peters... I guess...

We also learned all the different types of map projections in class, which helped me recognize these maps. This is also a humorous way for people who don't know the different map projections to learn it while still having a fun and good time. Maps are an important element in APHUG, because everyone should know how to read maps. It's part of Unit 1, because it shows the landmasses, and some maps can show different perspectives on things.

This quirky and humorous map will help the students in next year's APHUG class the different map projections, while having fun and finding out their personality that goes along with the different maps.

1) key geographical skills

Elle Reagan's curator insight, September 28, 2014 11:37 PM

This is a good overview of some different types of map projections and it has some humor too! I like how all the different types of map are all in one place. Also, each picture  is fairly detailed so that I can really see how one map is different from the next. I'm hoping this will be a good study tool in studying for the AP exam if there are any questions about different types of map projections.

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Worldmapper: The world as you've never seen it before

Worldmapper: The world as you've never seen it before | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Worldmapper is a collection of world maps, where territories are re-sized on each map according to the subject of interest."
Among the many compelling cartograms on this site is this one showing the prevalance of HIV.


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Lou Salza's comment, September 26, 2012 4:04 PM
Love the visual impact of this map especially for kids with learning differences!
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Map My Followers

Map My Followers | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is a great site that combines the power of geography, social media and geospatial technologies.  You can map where your twitter followers are (if they make the data publicly available).  Additionally, you can pan, zoom and identify specific followers and map their networks.  Can you find yourself on this map (followers of @APHumanGeog)? 

 


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Interactive World Statistics

Interactive World Statistics | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

The Brazilian government's geographic department (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística-roughly equivalent to the U.S. Census Bureau) has compiled an fantastic interactive world factbook (available in English and Spanish as well as Portuguese).  The ease of navigation allows the user to conduct a specific search of simply explore demographic, economic, environmental and development data on any country in the world.    

 

Tags: population, worldwide, statistics, mapping, zbestofzbest.


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Leonardo Martins's comment, October 20, 2012 11:08 AM
So cool…thank you very much!
Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 24, 2012 10:23 AM
The world, here, is literally at your fingertips. It is a simple way for anyone to locate a multitude of data about any given place around the world. It is another way that brings the whole world that much closer in this technological era.
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OpenStreetMap

A animation showing edits to http://OpenStreetMap.org over the period 2007-2012.

 

OpenStreetMap recently had it's "State of the Map" conference (Oct. 13-14) in Portland, Oregon. This video was embedded in a great article entitled "The New Cartographers" that summarizes some of the current issues discussed at the conference as well as concerns that confont the project.  The project has experienced exponential growth and is a major player in the world of online mapping (think Wikipedia for maps).  

 

Questions to Ponder: What are some advantages (and disadvantages) to an open source mapping data set?  What do you imagine is the future for the world largest open-source mapping data?  

 

Tags: mapping, cartography, geospatial, social media.


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Matthieu CLEMENT's comment, October 22, 2012 11:34 AM
excellent !
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Twitter Languages in London

Twitter Languages in London | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This map is a fantastic geovisualization that maps the spatial patterns of languages used on the social media platform Twitter.  This map was in part inspired by a Twitter map of Europe.  While most cities would be expected to be linguistically homogenous, but London's cosmopolitan nature and large pockets of immigrants influence the distribution greatly.

   

Tags: social media, language, neighborhood, visualization, cartography.


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Betty Denise's comment, November 7, 2012 1:13 PM
Thank you – again – for your tremendous partnership
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
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Election Results Map

Election Results Map | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Live election results from The Huffington Post. Romney vs. Obama, Senate, House and ballot measures.

 

This is one of many election maps that I am continually refreshing.  When I lived in California I would always try to stay up for the results--now that I'm on the East Coast I don't think that is going to happen tonight (FYI: I've refreshed this map too many times to count). 


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Jeff F's comment, November 9, 2012 4:41 PM
I projected this map for President Obama a few months ago. After his first debate disaster I said Florida would probably go to Romney as well.
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Puzzles that Make Geography Fun

Puzzles that Make Geography Fun | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Ever since London mapmaker and engraver John Spilsbury pasted one of his maps on a sheet of hardwood and cut it into small pieces with a marquetry saw (circa 1760), jigsaw puzzles have been used as a tool to teach children geography. Today, they are still a fun way for kids to learn more about their own country as well as the nations of the world."


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Day vs. Night population maps

Day vs. Night population maps | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

A great image for showing the pulsating rythmns of a dynamic urban system.  We treat population density as a static metric, but how many people are in a given place would truly be difficult to fully quantify.  What logisitic difficulties would this shift present for cities?  


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Wildcardspades58's comment, December 16, 2011 11:44 AM
I would be interested to find out how these were created and how the data was recorded.
Darius Kidd's comment, August 27, 2013 10:44 AM
There is not much Definiton on this map......
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The Best Maps of 2011

The Best Maps of 2011 | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
A round-up of the maps in 2011 that were popular, engaged users, innovated, and raised the bar for cartographic standards.

 

This could easily be 10 posts in one...This is an excellent collection of engaging maps that all have teaching applications. 


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Tweepsmap.com

Tweepsmap.com | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

While I prefer the mapping tools of www.mapmyfollowers.com this website, www.tweepsmap.com provides statistics about where your followers are from.  For example, my top four cities are: London, Houston, New York and Providence.  Top countries are: U.S. (46%) U.K. (18%) Canada (4.9%) Australia (4.1%) and Spain (3.2%).  Maps and statistics...what a great combination. 


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World Large Urban Areas 1905-2050

World Large Urban Areas 1905-2050 | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
In 1950, the world population was 2.5 billion and according to United Nations estimates, the world population reached seven billion sometime around October 31st this year.

Want some global population data sets to map for a GIS project?  Historical GIS? Here it is.


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Historypin

This is a video introduction to www.historypin.com which might just prove to be a very useful and important project.  It's historical geography powered by collaborative mapping that is infused with social media dynamics.  Backed by Google, they are geo-tagging old photos to recreate the historical geographies of all places and comparing them with current street view images.  You can search by topic, place or date...this has the potential to be very big.   


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4995songs's comment, November 16, 2011 4:13 PM
Absolutely brilliant! The possibilities that this offers are staggering. If museums, galleries, and archives all got on board with this, they could create an incredible database that would allow teachers to add so much more depth to their lessons. I feel like having a visual timeline paired with geographic references in this capacity would give students (and everyone else!) a stronger understanding of how deeply history and geography are connected.
Seth Dixon's comment, November 16, 2011 6:40 PM
Agreed, this is conceptually amazing...but what a vast undertaking. I'm half-tempted to upload some pictures but I know that I've got too many pet projects at the moment and think that this one has the potential to overwhelm me time-wise.
GIS student's comment, November 17, 2011 3:37 PM
Awesome site! As an aspiring teacher, this website can be great for then and now projects. When explaining different eras or time periods this not only shows where certain things took place, but what they looked like as well. Definitely something that will become more popular in the social media aspect of society. Definitely a site I can spend hours on.
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Google Maps "Real-Time"

Google Maps "Real-Time" | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This doesn't exist, but as we image geospatial technologies of the future, this is a glimpse into what real-time satellite imagery streaming could potentially look like (I understand some of the technical hurdles, this is sci-fi). This still image is a sorry visual approximation for this dynamic visual rendering; follow the link for the video version of this imaged, futuristic landscape. 

 


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Dania's comment, November 12, 2011 8:21 PM
This future google maps “real-time” application will be very interesting because it will convenience for my thing however in the other side it will be a violation of private. Insurance companies could use it against you or for you defend, the same in the case of FBI or other state office or government Issues. Everyone will uncover and public to everyone. It is something to think about it.
Seth Dixon's comment, November 12, 2011 10:27 PM
While I don't think we are anywhere near the satellite coverage to mimic millions of video cameras simultaneously filming earth at high resolution, it is fun to imagine the possibilities. Yet it is also a big concern depending on who could potentially access this data.
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BatchGeo: geocoding to create custom maps

BatchGeo: geocoding to create custom maps | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Make maps from a list of multiple addresses, create a mobile optimized map or locator. Free hosting for your custom interactive map or locator." 

Super easy to use, you can paste addresses from a spreadsheet to produce maps with your own data.   For a video about how to use BatchGeo see: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RiGSw9VccOo&feature=player_embedded


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Kim Vignale's comment, November 15, 2011 11:14 PM
Geocoding can give anybody the power to create their own maps of locations they encounter on a daily basis. It can help organize different groups and locations that are visited often. This is a great tool to create a visually appealing and organized map. If this program can be integrated with your gps device, it would make it easier to find a location with a click of one button.
Seth Dixon's comment, November 16, 2011 7:09 PM
Considering how easy this is to use, I think that many are scared away from making their own maps since it sounds harder than it really is. This brings mapping power to the people.