AP Human Geography Education
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The Big Religion Comparison Chart

The Big Religion Comparison Chart | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Big Religion Comparison Chart is a comparison chart of religions that compares the origins, beliefs, practices, and texts of world religions, small religions, ancient cults and new religious movements.

 

While I might disagree with a few of the nuances of their doctrinal generalizations, this is a great way to compare global religions with a similar framework (and to be fair, summarizing a 'world view' in few than two paragraphs is inherently problematic). 


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Dominique Kwon's curator insight, January 3, 2014 6:44 PM

This Chart is a convenient way for people to compare and contrast religions that are more common. This chart also tells the origin of the religion and the number of adherents. Which is talked about in much detail in Key Issue 1 of Chapter 6:Religions. 

-Dominique Kwon

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TED Talk: Readings of the Qu'ran

Lesley Hazleton explores the Quran and finds much that is quite different from what is reported in commonly cited accounts. A psychologist by training and Mi...

 

An excellent reading of the Qu'ran that situates what some well quoted (and misquoted) verses mean in the original Arabic. 


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 12:04 PM

Interesting video. We also see how interpretations can be warped with the Quran but that is not exclusive to this one text. The Bible for instance falls victim to the same circumstances.

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A Rio Runs Through It: Naming the American Stream

A Rio Runs Through It: Naming the American Stream | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Displayed is a map originally produced by Derek Watkins.  This map is a fantastic combination of physical and cultural geography.  While most flowing bodies of water will be called rivers or streams, the lesser used terms (brook, fork, bayou, run, arroyo, etc.) show a striking regionalization of toponym regions.  What do these patterns indicate?  Why are in those toponyms found in those particular places? 


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cookiesrgreat's comment, February 2, 2012 5:12 PM
This is one of my favorite maps. Combines geography, language and history
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:23 PM

unit 3

Devyn Hantgin's curator insight, March 23, 2015 9:27 PM

How to define regions and evaluate the regionalization process

This maps shows the different names to describe a river. The colors show regions based on what they call the body of water. Language is a great way to separate a population into regions.

This relates to our unit of study because we talk about regionalization and the different ways populations are divided into regions. When we look at the USA we tend to see patterns between the North and the South and the way they name things differently. 

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iPhone's Siri Has Trouble with Accents

iPhone's Siri Has Trouble with Accents | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

The computer programming is designed to understand voice patterns, but whose voice patterns?  Several accents, ranging from Scottish to Hispanic, are not recognized as "English" by the voice recognition command in the new iPhone.  So what does this mean as we try to understand the culture of technology?  The geography of language?      


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Isabelle Zahn's curator insight, January 2, 2014 7:56 PM

This article applies to language because of the whole accents concept. It als fits into pop culture because it is talking about the phone that millions of people around the world have. In this article it talks about how Siri the i phone voice recognition command can tell many languages and accents. The only accent that Siri cannot comprehend is that of a Latino. This has relevance in many communities because lots of people all over the world have i phones and use Siri including Latinos. In places that is a majority of Latinos the i phone if it wants to really apply to them should be able to understand their accent just like it could of anyone else. Short term effects could be people listening to what Apple had to say and just trying to use it more so that it will recognize them just like it would any other accent. A long term effect would be Apple making Siri understand the accent and maybe do other things with the i phone to make it apply more to Latinos making their market even bigger.

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NYTimes Video: Transforming Gulou

NYTimes Video: Transforming Gulou | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
A government-initiated redevelopment plan will transform one of the oldest neighborhoods in Beijing into a polished tourist attraction.

 

This 2010 video showcases one of China's urban transformation projects.  Urban revitalization plans are not without critics, especially those who see the cultural transformation of a neighborhood they deem worthy of historical preservation. 


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Albert Jordan's curator insight, April 17, 2014 1:20 PM

Progression or destruction? Out with the old and in with the new or the selling of ones soul? Of course those that are affected or disagree will say one thing and those that wish to develop will say another. While many will see this as a desecration of the past; at some point at a larger scale change must come. It is important to realize that China needs to do something with its people, whom are only multiplying. Much of the old towns and structures are not up to modern day standards of safety. As more people need to support themselves and their dependents, they will need jobs. The main, larger cities, can only support so much. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 1:57 PM

Is this not gentrification in China. Old neighborhoods being transformed to suit more profitable ventures. Makes you wonder what will happen to the people who live in Gulou if tourism comes to the area. Furthermore, the identity of Gulou is at risk, if China is to develop old historical areas, I think it would be best to do so in a way that works with in the framework of the existing local culture and preserves the history of the area.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:43 PM

Stories such as this are incredibly sad but also rather controversial, On one side of the issue the Chinese Government wishes to modernize its nation to be able to compete with the other global powers and to do so they seek to rebuild many of its old cities, The other side of the issue is that these cities marked to be destroyed and rebuilt have vast historical significance to both China and the whole region. It seems short sighted of China to destroy their past looking only to the future. 

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Top 10 Reasons Alabama’s New Immigration Law Is a Disaster for Agriculture

Top 10 Reasons Alabama’s New Immigration Law Is a Disaster for Agriculture | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Alabama’s new immigration law, H.B. 56, is already devastating the state’s agricultural sector."

 

Does teaching agriculture have to be boring?  This particular issue is an excellent current topic that combines politics, culture and demographics within agriculture.   

 


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Mac steel's comment, March 8, 2013 10:09 AM
Technoloy
Valorie Morgan's curator insight, November 7, 2013 10:13 AM

The new immigration laws have caused farmers to cut back on crops due to low empolyment rate. The immgrants that were currently working for farmers, ran off in fear of being captured. I'm against this law, I see exactly where the farmers are coming from. I believe these laws are pointless, it's just people trying to make an honest buck in the hot sun. Alabama is losing a great deal of agriculture due to this new law. Even though, they say its againast the law. I don't see the point. Why be so hard on these farmer??

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 12:08 AM

This article shows how important it is to follow the natural way of agriculture. With the new laws in Alabama being passed it now allows people to grow crops in an unnatural way which is devastating predicament to the agricultural world. 

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Folk Cultures: Fiddler on the roof

Folk cultures are rural, religious, agricultural, family-based and in a word: traditional.  This classic movie's opening 10 minutes are a good primer for markers of folk cultures and struggles that folk cultures have to maintain there vitality in a globalizing world.  

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A Fight to Save One of Latin America's Oldest Neighborhoods

A Fight to Save One of Latin America's Oldest Neighborhoods | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
In Panama City, a plan to build a marine viaduct around a colonial-era neighborhood has residents up in arms...

 

Urban preservation, the historical geography of communities and the cultural character of the urban environment are themes that are deeply embedded in this quick yet potent article by geographer, Thomas Sigler. 


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Paige Therien's curator insight, February 12, 2014 11:34 PM

This is an issue that citizens and governments struggle with all around the world.  Spots like this one, which is "the oldest continuously inhabited European settlement on the Pacific coast of the Americas", are treasured by residents, citizens, and tourists alike.  But when does a historical area need to adapt to growing populations (and therefore increasingly congested streets)?  Or should they at all?  Projects like these take a lot of time, effort, and money to complete.  When visual reminders of local history are taken away, it risks the chance of the knowledge of  the history being lost as well.  The funny thing is, this development is felt to be necessary in order to better accommodate large influxes of tourists which are attracted to this historical site, which if the development takes place, may ruin the charm of the neighborhood; it is a viscous cycle.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 29, 2014 2:23 PM

The preservation of this neighborhood is important for one's sense of place.  The marine viaduct would take away for the history that is embedded in Panama City. While a viaduct would be incredibly useful and profitable, i understand why residents would be concerned.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 10:23 PM

Just from looking at this picture, this doesn't really look like a bad neighborhood to live in, despite it being one of the oldest in Latin America. They wish to turn the old neighborhood into a highway with six lands of traffic. The neighborhood was founded back in 1673 by the Spanish Crown. It is described as a charming colonial-era World Heritage Site and as previously stated, the oldest European settlement on the Pacific coast. The cobblestone streets, Spanish colonial architecture and majestic plazas have earned a considerable amount of international acclaim in the past 10 years, attracting tourists. Back and forth the debate goes about whether or not to demolish this neighborhood. A neighborhood resident and real estate agent has been fighting against the project. She got a group together and so far they have been successful at protesting and even meeting with the President to voice their opinion. At the moment, it is unclear at what the outcome will be.

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How did Pakistan get it's name?

How did Pakistan get it's name? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The name of the country Pakistan has a fascinating history - it is essentially an acronym!  Prior to 1947, the country now known as Pakistan was a British colony. In 1947 the United Kingdom granted independence to the region under a new name, Pakistan. The name had been developed by a group of students at Cambridge University who issued a pamphlet in 1933 called Now or Never."

 

In a country with such great ethnic divisions, a common religion is a powerful nationalizing force.  As the capital city of Islamabad's toponym powerfully states (the house or abode of Islam), religion remains an important element of national identity for Pakistanis.   


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 28, 2015 3:15 PM

Pakistan is simply abbreviated from it's nations or nations that border Pakistan. P stands for Punjab, A stands for Afghania, K stands for Kashmir, I stands for Iran, S stands for Singh, T stands for Tukharistan, A stands for Afghanistan. However, there is no "N." Instead we classified the last letter as Balochistan but because "stan" is the Persian pronunciation for "country." Pakistan decided to abbreviate "N" as a silent so they can successfully abbreviate "Pakistan" instead of "Pakista."

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, November 9, 2015 3:03 PM

Re-scooped from Professor Dixon, primarily for how ridiculous it is. Most of us figured there was some decent reason (like the neighboring 'Stan's) for why  and how Pakistan got its name. Nope, there really wasn't any good reason to name it Pakistan, it is an acronym. One that makes absolutely no sense whatsoever.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 6:47 PM
Until reading this, I thought this was another country that had a "stan" name just like the rest. I never knew that Pakistan received it's makeshift name my a bunch Cambridge University students. It is composed of lands taken from homelands: Punjab, Afghania,, Kashmir, Iran , Sindh, Tukharistan, Afghanistan, and balochistaN.
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UNESCO World Heritage sites

UNESCO World Heritage sites | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Combines information from UNESCO, Google Earth and Wikipedia to deliver visual and written information on over 900 World Hertitage sites." 

An excellent resource for student projects. 


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Body Ritual of the Nacirema

Body Ritual of the Nacirema | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Written by Harold Miner, the Body Ritual of the Nacirema was written in part to parallel an early 20th century cultural anthropology report on a culture this can be used to discuss culture and different perspectives of culture groups.  This could be very fun, especially waiting to see when the "aha" moment comes and they understand just who the Nacirema are (the SPOILER will be embedded in the comment section).  It is lengthy and written as academic paper, so for K-12 use, I'd recommend using snippets and having them work in groups to analyze the seemingly bizarre cultural rituals of the Nacirema.  


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Seth Dixon's comment, November 11, 2011 2:17 PM
**SPOILER ALERT** The NACERIMA are is modern American society (American spelled backwards). This little bit of information drastically changes the reading.
Seth Dixon's comment, November 14, 2011 4:05 PM
The "Nacirema" are "American" spelled backwards (or interpreted backwards).
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NPR: Saudi Women Drive Change Despite Mixed Signals

Authorities continue to go after women who flout Saudi Arabia's ban on female drivers, but King Abdullah has pledged to give women more political power in the coming years.

 

This article focuses on public space and differentiated cultural norms that created deeply gendered spaces that are onerous to navigate. Gender, Place and Culture are all intertwined.   


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NPR: In The Hills Of Rio, Shantytowns Get A Makeover

Rio de Janeiro, which is hosting soccer's World Cup in 2014 and the Olympics in 2016, is trying to remake its hundreds of favelas.

 

There are urban geography applications obviously, but what about the cultural, political and economic logic of purging the slums before "the world comes to visit?"  We've seen this recently in Beijing and in other sites of international events.  Why now?  Why not before?   


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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, October 6, 2013 9:02 PM

The facelift that Rio de Janeiro is receiving in anticipation of the World Cup in 2014 and the Olympics in 2016 is sapping up a large amount of Brazil's resources, resources that some lower class Brazilians argue should be allocated to improving roads or schools. The government led make-over reminds me of the upper-class driven gentrification of urban areas in places like NYC that were previously neighborhoods for lower-class residents. I don't think we will be able to understand the effects of this remodeling until after the Cup and the Olympics have come and gone. If Brazil keeps it up and continues to "improve" outlier areas, what will Brazil look like in 20 years?

Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 16, 2013 1:04 PM

There are urban geography applications obviously, but what about the cultural, political and economic logic of purging the slums before "the world comes to visit?"  We've seen this recently in Beijing and in other sites of international events.  Why now?  Why not before?  

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 11:21 AM

I find it sad that although Rio de Janiero obviously has a huge socioeconomic gap between the wealthy and the poor, it takes the prospect of the World Cup and Olympics for them to act. Furthermore their solution to cover up their slums is short sighted and they refuse to look at the deep seeded roots of the issue.

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Inside a halal slaughterhouse in Queens

This is the story of a halal slaughterhouse in Queens. It is a bit graphic at times, but the culture, history and passion behind the business is fascinating.

 

While a bit gruesome in moments, this video is an excellent view into the inner workings of an ethnic neighborhood.  Why are the cultural connections to a 'homeland' so important to immigrants?  Why is halal meat more expensive than what you would find in a grocery store?  Why is food such an important part of culture?  For more about this NY company and what halah is, see: http://madanihalal.com/ ;       


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elsa hunziker's comment, January 30, 2012 2:24 PM
D:
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 8, 2014 3:51 PM

While a bit gruesome in moments, this video is an excellent view into the inner workings of an ethnic neighborhood.  Why are the cultural connections to a 'homeland' so important to immigrants?  Why is halal meat more expensive than what you would find in a grocery store?  Why is food such an important part of culture?  For more about this NY company and what halah is, click here.     

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Christmas in Mexico

Christmas in Mexico | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
There are some very special traditions surrounding Christmas celebrations in Mexico.

 

Yo quiero encontrar un lugar en New England con buñuelos!


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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 15, 2014 11:18 PM

Merry Christmas! Feliz Navidad as they say in Mexico. There are many different unique ways that Christmas is celebrated here. Some of their Christmas traditions originated in Spain and other's developed in Mexico. Christmas celebrations usually take place throughout the whole month of December. Holiday foods are of course a big part of the celebration. Dishes include ensalada de Noche Buena and ponche Navideno. Mexico has other famous traditions as well. There is one tradition that takes place every year from December 16th up until Christmas, where processions reenact Mary and Joseph's search for Bethlehem. Also, like the US, nativity scenes are present throughout the holiday season. Another thing done in Mexico that is similar to the US is the idea of Christmas carolers. However, in Mexico, they call them Villancicos. Although some traditions remain the same, there are some different, more unique ones that we here in the US do not include in our Christmas celebrations.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 10:12 PM

I love reading about holidays like Christmas and how the traditions surrounding it varies, or are similar to our own. For instance i notice that the Christmas tree is a symbol of Christmas the seems to be very global however the food served for the holiday is drastically different between different cultures. Definitely would make a cool research project.

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iTunes: Geography Videos

iTunes: Geography Videos | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Two videos from a TV producer who is now in the geography classroom are available for free in the iTunes store.  The 1st video shows a lot of great examples of material culture items found during archeological digs called "The Ancient Agora." 

 

The 4th is a 30 minute film on the Kathmandu Valley of Nepal, which shows many sacred sites, burial/cremation practices, and other aspects of Nepali culture.  For more work by this fellow geography teacher see: http://www.agiftforthevillage.blogspot.com/


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Interactive Sistine Chapel

Interactive Sistine Chapel | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

One of the amazing memories of my trip to Europe was visiting the Vatican and developing a kink in my neck from marveling at the ceiling in the Sistine Chapel.  No photography is allowed to preserve reverence in what many consider not only a cultural heritage site, but a holy site.  This link is the next best thing to being in the Vatican staring at the Sistine Chapel.  We might not be able to travel the world with our students, but this can help us bring the world to our classroom.


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Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 2014 10:50 AM

This is a very cool opportunity due to the fact that photography isn't usually allowed in the Sistine chapel. Of course it can't compare to the beauty of the place in person, but in some ways it's almost more powerful as this room is usually filled to the brim with tourists, seeing it empty is a bit more striking as you can appreciate the fool instead of missing it in the crowds of people.

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NYTimes: The Geography of Thanksgiving Foods

NYTimes: The Geography of Thanksgiving Foods | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The terms cooks enter into search engines can provide clues as to what dishes are being cooked around the nation.

 

Some fascinating (if not entirely scientific) maps that show the most common searches on www.allrecipes.com and regional differences in food preferences.  More importantly, it also is an interesting glimpse into the geography of language.  Some similar dishes are called by more regional names (e.g.-"Stuffing" in the Northeast and West, "Dressing" in the Midwest and South).  This set of maps also reinforces the concepts of regions.  This is a fun way to teach some actual content and enjoy the holiday.


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Religious Geography of the United States

Religious Geography of the United States | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

A set of 2000 census maps that focus on religion in the United States.  Even in secular societies, religion can play an important role within society, both culturally and politically.  Include are links to many more religious maps.  


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Rebecca!Morgan Geography's curator insight, November 21, 2013 1:30 PM
Geography- these maps show the diverse religions and the distribution of them.
Andrew and Tom's curator insight, November 25, 2013 3:11 PM

This map shows the consentration of religion in the US and how ut mainly is in the south.

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Linguistic diversity dwindling

Linguistic diversity dwindling | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"80% of all web communication is in ten languages, yet 95% of humanity speaks roughly 300 languages.  Could Apple Siri and Google Voice help save the world's languages?"

 

This graph stunningly displays the result of dwindling linguistic diversity in this era of globalization and technological innovation.  Why have so many languages been dwindling?  Why are an important few growing? What is the future of the majority of the world's languages that have so few native speakers?   


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GIS student's comment, September 18, 2012 10:57 AM
I think there is a lot of emphasis in this article based on help. The only way certain languages are going to survive is if people help promote them. I feel that most Americans are blind to the substantial amount of languages that exist because everywhere we look people are tuning English as there primary language. Global advertisements are commonly seen in English. The Olympics had an incredible amount as well. I think the root of this problem starts with education of new languages, especially in America. Language is definitely something that needs to be embraced especially at a younger age.
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LEARN

"3 guys, 44 days, 11 countries, 18 flights, 38 thousand miles, an exploding volcano, 2 cameras and almost a terabyte of footage." 

This video beautifully encapsulates the spirit of a globalized educational experience and the value of geographic understanding in an ever-interconnected world.   Geography is about broadening our minds to other places, other cultures and other ways of doing things.  In a three part series including 'Eat' and 'Move.' 


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 27, 2011 10:04 PM
I agree completely with geography is about broadening our minds to other places, other cultures, and other ways of doing things. You need to be apart of other cultures, and other country norms in order to truly respect them and learn about them. Overall you need to explore other places, and cultures with all your five senses. You need to be able to see the beauty of the place, taste the foods of the culture, listen to the sounds arounds you, smell the the distinctive scents, and touch and feel the concrete piece of land.
Seth Dixon's comment, November 29, 2011 5:49 PM
I'm a sucker for these video clips since they embody the joy of experiencing the new and the different.
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 12:30 PM

This is great because it shows people are round the world what great people and cultures are available for people to explore. It also shows that great spirit that people are exposed to. It also shows that people are outgoing and do not let nothing bring them down.

 

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Google Search reveals religious biases/ stereotypes

Google Search reveals religious biases/ stereotypes | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Not saying that Google Search itself is biased, but that it can reveal the bias of internet users and all of the "information" posted online.  Within the proper context, seeing potential searches can be very informative about cultural perceptions, online communities and prejudices.   Be cautious and judicious in how (or if) you use this within a classroom setting.   See comments for additional results of additional "religious" searches. 


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Seth Dixon's comment, November 13, 2011 2:48 PM
For the search "why are mormons so..." the results were 1) nice 2) happy and 3)rich.
Seth Dixon's comment, November 13, 2011 3:40 PM
For the search "Why are atheists so..." the results were 1) angry 2) hated and 3) mean.
Seth Dixon's comment, November 13, 2011 3:43 PM
For the search "Why are Hindus so..." the results were 1) afraid of Muslims 2) angry with Avatar 3) cheap and 4) smart.
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Plastic Bottle House, Developmental Association for Renewable Energies

Plastic Bottle House, Developmental Association for Renewable Energies | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

One person's trash is another person’s building material...or so it would seem. In the village of Sabon Yelwa the Developmental Association for Renewable Energies (DARE) has instigated an ingenious scheme to transform the region’s litter problem into a positive future for the community through the construction of new residences.


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Fabián Salazar Bazúa's curator insight, March 11, 2013 7:09 PM

Otro ejemplo de lo que la creatividad e imaginación puede hacer con las construcciones.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 2014 5:53 PM

Creativity at its finest! In Sabon Yelwa new residences are constructed from plastic bottles. It is a great way of using something that does harm for the planet and turning it into something beneficial. DARE uses litter as a way to provide decent shelter and eliminate trash filling the streets. Plus it serves as an interesting focal piece!

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 22, 2014 3:28 PM

Nigeria may have a growing economy, but unfortunately, it suffers from a lack of housing for its growing population. Instead of building houses from non-renewable materials, the Developmental Association for Renewable Energies (DARE), has come up with an ingenious way to battle homelessness and the growing waste problem. Houses are being built out of plastic drink bottles filled with sand that are mortared together to build sturdy, insulated walls. While we do not often correlate developing countries with sustainability, this is truly something that could be utilized throughout the world in order to address homelessness and recycling issues around the world. 

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Language on Twitter

Language on Twitter | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
API Cartographer Eric Fischer plots language shapefiles of Twitter.

 

Some other images show how social media cuts across place, time and culture and communications have 'defeated' geography to unite the world.  This image (besides looking pretty) shows that culture and place still matter within our increasingly interconnected globalized communications.  There are some very real creating obstacles to diffusion and even if the technology exists for "one huge conversation," there are non-intersecting conversations because of cultural and community differences. 


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Emily Bian's curator insight, October 3, 2014 5:13 PM

This is a thematic map showing the different languages spoken on Twitter in Europe. This Europe thematic is really neat to look at, but it also shows globalization in that Twitter is everywhere, and people are more connected because of it. This increases interactions between people living in different countries, and even different continents. 

            3) language and communication

This will help future APHUG students, because Twitter is relatable to a lot of teens and it will open their eyes to the different languages spoken across Europe and the world, and it's not just English. It connects them to the rest of the world. 

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Vanuatu: Meet The Natives

"Five men from the remote Pacific island of Tanna arrive in America to experience western culture for the first time, and force us to look at ourselves through brand new eyes..."

 

This cross-cultural experiment reinforces numerous stereotypes, but also seeks to get viewers to look at issues from a variety of perspectives.  Folk cultures, modernization and globalization are all major themes of this show.     


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Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 10, 2015 7:14 PM

This reminds me of what we learned in class about American people or white folks in general go to a native island and want to see the natives uncivilized and not up with the times of technology, clothes, homes made of up to date material. They want to see grass skirts, old tools, tribal living. The white folks see modern times already they want to see old things.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:19 PM

I think exercises like this are really cool, there are a lot of these experiments that go on with culture swaps and I always find the reactions when returning home to be probably the most interesting, just like in this video it is a large celebrations and it helps to put things in perspective

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:42 PM

This is a show that is based on how we see and view daily life of native people as compared to our own. How ever I feel as though this show is more based on the how these people actually live rather then adapting and learning to the area that they are in. It does show how globalization plays an important role in the show.