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Google Earth for Educators: 50 Exciting Ideas for the Classroom

Google Earth for Educators: 50 Exciting Ideas for the Classroom | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Find ideas for any age student and a handful of virtual tours that will not only help you instruct your students, but might even teach you something along the way.

 

Ideas for all grade levels, ages and abilities. 


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Europe's four big dilemmas

Europe's four big dilemmas | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The BBC looks at four big questions that need to be answered if the eurozone crisis is to be laid to rest.

The crisis of our times...


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The Atlantic: Where in the World? A Google Earth Puzzle

The Atlantic: Where in the World? A Google Earth Puzzle | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Looking at the world through via Google Earth offers striking images of the diversity of our planet and the impact that humans have had on it. Today's entry is a puzzle.

 

This article provides 25 amazing views of the earth and challenges us to use geographic clues to arrive at an educated guess as to where on Earth it is.  Besides being beautiful, this is a ready-made class activity for analyzing the physical or cultural landscape (complete with an answer key and even a written clue!).


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Video: Fighting Poverty with Ingenuity

I absolutely love creative, out-of-the-box, innovative people! People who use their creativity to make a difference in the World.... Incredible! "We want to ...

 

Find out more about this organization at: http://isanglitrongliwanag.org/

 


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Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, November 30, 2015 2:50 PM

This video shows ingenuity of a persons mind and plastic bottles. This is a use of something that seems to useless but plays a very large roll in daily life of the people. This plastic bottle filled with water and placed in thecut out of tin roofs created natural sunlight for the the people in the poorest communities. This cut power bills and it also created a safer living situation for the people. It shows the use for something so useless in our area of the community but so usefull to other areas of the world.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:12 PM

this is a great invention, however the use of these light bottles would be restricted to environments where water never freezes. however, in regions which are economically in trouble where it is generally warm, it can be a cheap source of light in a normally dark building.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 4:01 PM

people making the best of their situation and being inovative and creative is insperational and the rest of the world should follow suit

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Perspectives: Reconsider Columbus Day

Reconsider Columbus Day Presented by Nu Heightz Cinema rethink columbus day reconsider christopher columbus anti columbus day...

 

Without need to adopt one particular ideological perspective, this can be used to discuss distinct cultural perspectives and show how we frame geographic and historic information in our own context.


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A Burmese spring?

A Burmese spring? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"THE recent news from Myanmar, that beautiful, blighted land formerly known as Burma, has offered an all-too-rare cause for optimism." 


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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 8, 2014 12:10 PM

This is interesting and hopefully turns out to be a good thing for Myanmar.  After being under so much oppression from not only its own government but from other countries as well.  Having this improved more relaxed government that works more for the people is a definite improvement for Myanmar.  Standing up to China about closing the dam because the people that live in Myanmar aren't benefiting from it and are still poor.  Stepping up and listening to the people that live in the country and standing up to others that are taking advantage of the country is a huge step in the right direction on improving the lives of those in the country.

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Turning Old Gas Stations into Good Urbanism

Turning Old Gas Stations into Good Urbanism | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Aurash Khawarzad looks at three projects that turned crude into gold, as old gas stations are quickly updated into a movie theater, a cafe and a restaurant.

 

Different models of energy usage and urban form would lead to a radically distinct urban environment. 

 


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ALLEGRET Nicolas's curator insight, December 2, 2014 10:46 AM

Ce petit article évoque la réutilisation d'anciennes stations services de carburant pour de nouveaux usages comme en faire des cafés, des restaurants et même des théâtres ! 

 

On pourrait appeler cela de la réhabilitation urbaine ou bien des "changements de destination" de ces bâtiments, ces termes techniques en urbanisme désigne parfaitement l'action qui est menée sur ces projets. 

 

Il faut aussi évoquer qu'en faisant cela les rues voient leur cachet augmenter, il n'y a donc à première vue que des aspects positifs. 

ZiyCharMatt's curator insight, March 3, 2015 8:59 PM

This artice talks about how these old gas stations changed into something urban like Movie theater, malls and etc.

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Timelapse - The City Limits

*UPDATE May 10th: Here's a video interview that I did this morning for MSNBC : http://on.msnbc.com/juqWHz ---------- I shot this timelapse montage from late 2010 through early 2011. One year in the making.

 

With the intention of showing the duality between city and nature the time lapse, Dominic Boudreault created a beautiful montage of the urban landscape that is a thought-provoking piece. Locations include Montreal, Quebec, Toronto, New York and Chicago.


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Video: "Way Back Home"

Way Back Home is the incredible new riding clip from Danny MacAskill, it follows him on a journey from Edinburgh back to his hometown Dunvegan, in the Isle o...

 

This extreme sports clip is infused with gorgeous physical landscapes and marvelously quaint, iconic cultural landscapes.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 18, 2014 9:11 AM

This extreme sports clip is infused with gorgeous physical landscapes and marvelously quaint, iconic cultural landscapes (and I love the music).  This is one of my favorite videos, and in my based-paced geography videos collection.  


Tag: Scotland, sport, landscape.

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The truth and it's opposite: Japanese Addresses

How Japanese addresses work, and other opposites, by Derek Sivers - http://sivers.org...

 

What is true is often dependent on your perspective, the context and is situated within a particular paradigm.  This is a mind-blowing video because it exposed our framework (which might go unquestioned as universal) to be but one of many ways in which to organize the world and the information within it.  

 

Those of you who are stymied by a school's filter and feel you can't use YouTube in the classroom, try YouTube Downloader: http://youtubedownload.altervista.org/ ;


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Alex Smiga's curator insight, October 4, 2015 11:30 AM

Nice little eye opener for when you think you know anything for certain

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Large Cities: Where the Skills Are

Large Cities: Where the Skills Are | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Human progress, to a large degree, has depended on the continual expansion of social networks, which enable faster sharing and shaping of ideas. And humanity’s greatest social innovation remains the city.

 

Urban networks depend on increasing interaction and collaboration...and it pays off.  This article details the correlation between population size of a city and the earning potential of its citizens.


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Seth Dixon's comment, October 5, 2011 9:36 PM
My pleasure!
Thomas Robson's curator insight, May 20, 2014 8:34 AM

This article details the correlation between population size of a city and the earning potential of it's citizens. Human progress, to a large degree, has depended on the continual expansion of social networks, which enable faster sharing and shaping of ideas. And humanity’s greatest social innovation remains the city. As our cities grow larger, the synapses that connect them—people with exceptional social skills—are becoming ever more essential to economic growth."The bars on this map show three types of job skills—analytic, social, and physical. The height of each bar is a measure of the average mix of skill within a given city’s labor force—the higher the bar, the more advanced the skill level within that city." 


The fact that the article call them all city is an example of Urban Hierarchy, a theory discussed in our AP Human Geography Urban Unit. This article does not touch on any of the zone models we learned in our unit. The article is able to show through this map that the more analytic jobs there are in a cities Central Business District the higher the average pay the city has. (As evidenced by New York and Boston being much higher then say Albuquerque).  

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Europe moves to end passport-free travel in migrant row

Europe moves to end passport-free travel in migrant row | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
European interior ministers agree to 'radical revision' of Schengen amid fears of a flood of migrants from north Africa...

 

The Schengen Treaty is one of the most important aspects that facilitate the free flow of People goods and capital in Europe.  With increasing cultural anxiety connected to immigration during economic rough times, will this signal a reversal of Europe's trend towards increasing regional integration? 


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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 9:32 PM

European nations moved to reverse decades of unfettered travel across the continent when a majority of EU governments agreed the need to reinstate national passport controls amid fears of a flood of immigrants fleeing the upheaval in North Africa. In a serious blow to one of the cornerstones of a united, integrated Europe, EU interior ministers embarked on a radical revision of the passport-free travel regime known as the Schengen system to allow the 26 participating governments to restore border controls. They also agreed to combat immigration by pressing for "readmission accords" with countries in the Middle East and north Africa to send refugees back to where they came from. The policy shift was pushed by France and Italy, who have been feuding and panicking in recent weeks over a small influx of refugees from Tunisia. But 15 of the 22 EU states which had signed up to Schengen supported the move, with only four resisting, according to officials and diplomats present.

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Hot-Dog Factory Jobs Prove Tough Sell in Struggling Oklahoma Town

Hot-Dog Factory Jobs Prove Tough Sell in Struggling Oklahoma Town | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
A hot-dog and ham plant has had a tough time filling its jobs even in struggling Seminole, Okla.

 

It's not just jobs that Americans want; it's the right kind of job that they feel is compatible with their education, training and lifestyle.  Not too surprisingly, those willing to work this job include immigrants.  This year old-article shows some of the difficulties in promoting secondary sector jobs, especially in rural America. 


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Coral Reefs Most at Risk

Coral Reefs Most at Risk | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
A new map ranks the world's coral reefs by the risks they face from warming oceans, overfishing and other stress factors, which will help scientists focus on conserving the reefs with the most likely success.

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Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 17, 2014 9:00 PM

With this know fact of Coral Reefs at risk for disappearing, what are we to do. I believe in order to preserve our coral reefs around the world, more education on the importance of having the coral reefs on our coast. While there is little things we can do in regards to the rise of temperatures, we can reduce our human activity on the coast such as fishing and coastal development.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 13, 2015 9:28 PM

This map makes me think the beginning of the semester when you were showing us all the different ways maps can look based on the data. I never would have choose to make a map based on the coral reefs, but clearly there is a need for one. I don’t fully understand the math behind all the variables that shows how this map was made, but given the amount of variables mentioned in the article I think this is a very comprehensive map. So even though other maps may come up with different results, I would stand by this one due to the sheer volume of information analyzed.

 

I hope that the map is able to actually save some of the reefs around the Middle East and Australia (the highest risk areas) because I couldn’t even begin to imagine the damage the disappearance of one would have on the ecosystem. I know the article mentioned that the some of the prime factors were "surface temperature" and "ultra violet radiation," which supposedly couldn't be helped. However, I learned in my GEO 100 class that increase in surface temperature and ultra-violet radiation relates to global warming, Since global warming is partially man made, I do wonder why the prime factors can't be managed more though. Or is it that the impact of global warming can't be revered quickly enough so the ones most damaged are too far gone? Regardless, hopefully some of the other factors can be controlled enough to make a difference. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:07 PM

This map of the coral reefs that are in the most danger shows that the Polynesian reefs are the most t risk. This is due to warming sea temperatures and overpopulated fishing. The second being the area of the Carribbean. This is a area of constant sunlight which is good for the reef but at the same time can be bad because of the warming of the sea temperatures. 

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BBC: Development-How bottles bring light to world's poorest

BBC: Development-How bottles bring light to world's poorest | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
A simple initiative in the Philippines is bringing a bit of brightness into the lives of the country's poorest people.

 

This clip is brimming with classroom potential.  Development is a key component to this clip, but it could also become a service learning project as students adopt a great project to help others in more difficult financial situations.  Learn more about the project at: http://isanglitrongliwanag.org/


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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:31 PM

This is very innovative as people in the Philippines have found a way to light their homes with just a plastic bottle. Using bleach and water and a piece of metal, there is temporary light for many people who would otherwise live in darkness. Starting with just 1 bottle in 1 home, this homemade product's total is now 15,000 units. I was very impressed that something as simple as a bottle filled with water can cost just $1 to make and give off even more light than an average light-bulb. I predict that this mini invention will become even more widespread as more poor countries catch on to this new, resourceful idea. 

Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 26, 2015 3:45 PM

The solution to a problem in this video owes itself to geographical factors, had this been a problem in the US, the solution would have been different.  Having said this, the "American Way" to solve problems isn't always the best way to do so.  The Philippines is a collection of islands and they are ravaged by hurricanes, so to put above ground powerlines would be highly expensive, and to connect the whole nations infrastructure would require the nation running very expensive powerlines underneath the ocean.  What the man does in this video is ingenious given the location and the solution to the problem.  Since the Philippines are a warm country and the houses only have a single roof layer, by cutting a whole in the roof taping a coke bottle into the whole (filled with water and a bit of chlorine) allows a cheap and effective source of light.  By doing this, the people will not have to spend a great deal on electricity (if it is in their region) and if they do not have electricity then they still have a source of light. 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 9:26 PM

what a genius! of course as mentioned in class this works in the Philippines because of the tin roofs and the climate. You could not do this in cold places because the water would freeze. but this is just another sign that communities figure out ways to survive. What works in one place isn't always good for others but this sure works here.

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NYTimes video: Sweden's Immigrant Identity

NYTimes video: Sweden's Immigrant Identity | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
One out of four Swedes are immigrants or have a parent with an immigrant background.

 

Demographic shifts leading to political and cultural tensions.   Europe, which historically has been a source of migrants, is relatively new to be a destination for migrants and that has heightened some of the conflicts. 


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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 2014 6:29 PM

This video is shows the changing demographics of Sweden. Sweden and several other wealthier countries of Europe are now destinations for immigrants where they were once the origin of them. The change is difficult for these nations as they are somewhat unprepared economically and politically for significant immigration.

 

The immigrants end up feeling unwanted in their new country and their old. This feeling of being unwanted is possibly worse than it would be in the United States, a country more accustomed to immigration.

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, March 29, 2014 8:07 PM

This growingly intense immigration situation parallels that of our own here in the U.S. and in many other countries throughout the world. World citizens, refugees, don't feel at home in their birth country nor do they feel welcomed in their current home or host country. This puts a lot of stress and pressure on these already punished populations. That's not to say that the host countries concerned citizens don't have a reason to be worried, but are their responses appropriate or productive?  

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 11:29 AM

Europe is a place that makes traveling to different countries relatively easy. This makes sense that their would be migration that is inter-european. 

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Urban Density and Design

http://www.ted.com How can cities help save the future? Alex Steffen shows some cool neighborhood-based green projects that expand our access to things we wa...

 

Urban density and design connected with energy usage and climate change. 


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Samantha Fuller's curator insight, September 27, 2013 1:44 PM

We think that the climate change has to do with using fossil fuels. And althogh creating a clean sourse of energy is a good plan it doesn't solve everything. Soon we will not be able to create enough energy for everyone who uses it.

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NYTimes: Russian Anger Grows Over Chechnya Subsidies

NYTimes: Russian Anger Grows Over Chechnya Subsidies | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Resentment over the lavish federal subsidies paid to Chechnya and other regions in the North Caucasus could become a liability for Prime Minister Vladimir V. Putin of Russia.

 

Multi-ethnic states, political geography and Russia's geopolitical complexities. 


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 20, 2013 3:39 PM

The article brings back memories of this past year and the Boston Marathon where the two bombers were found out to be from the Chechen region.  Due to social networks and word of mouth, many people jumped to assume that the attack was because of "the Russians".  Little was known about Chechnya and the people within the area, but it showed that in America at least, there was quite a bit of ignorance and assumption floating around.  Even political figures and in news reports there was confusion of the exact boundaries and ethnic backgrounds that the region possessed.  It shows the media gives people what they want to hear, and the listeners are seldom to do their own research to understand the truth.

Russia and its surrounding region has constantly been changing since the fall of the Soviet Union.  New countries form and more ethnicities arise constantly and with all these new developments form even newer confusion.  Many of these areas intertwine various languages, religions, cultures, and at times putting a barrier between them is nearly impossible.  As reports unravelled, they showed actual conflict between Chechnya and those of the Russian capital, Moscow.  There had been hostage situations and terrorist plots carried out by people suspected to be from the Chechen region and even the Russian president Vladimir Putin had grown angry about being apart of Chechnya.  With all these events and learnings, it shows that some countries still have people and areas within its boundaries that have little known about them.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 6, 2014 8:56 PM

Vladimir Putin was once a symbol of efficiency in Russia, but now that tensions are growing due to the subsidies that are being paid to Chechnya. As the article states, Putin's policies are starting to seem like a dead end and will only get more expensive as time goes on.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 12:23 PM

We don't usually hear about Chechnya subsidies usually it has to do with growing tensions or terrorism. In Russia there are so many ethnic and political divisions that it make sense the Russians feel allegiance to their ethnic group rather than Russia and there for when the government subsidizes Chechnya they see it as Russia subsidizing a population that really isn't "Russian".

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Gallery of Tombolos

Gallery of Tombolos | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Pictures of these rare sandbars that extend to a nearshore island.

 

Coastal physical geography produces beautiful landforms...these tombolos (some famous like Mont St. Michel) provide visual examples of numerous geomorphological processes. 


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AIDS/HIV Video: Development and Disease

Justine Ojambo, co-founder of the SLF-funded project PEFO in Uganda, talks about losing his mother to AIDS and PEFO's work to support children orphaned by AI...

 

THis is a great video on AIDS/HIV in Africa.  So many show Africans as passive victims of global and environmental forces beyond their control, this one is of empowered and inspiring people seeking to change the world.  For more inspiration AIDS/HIVS videos from Africa, see: http://stephenlewisfoundation.org/news-resources/multimedia/video-clips


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Peter Siner's comment, November 16, 2011 10:08 PM
it seems as though there is little we can do to help help end this horrible plague in africa besides donate money or food , relgion is such a huge factor in their decision making process
Crissy Borton's curator insight, December 11, 2012 9:31 PM

One thing that stuck out to me in this video is when he spoke about the making sure the children’s basic needs are met so they can concentrate on school. That is such a problem in our education system today that people don’t wish to address. I wonder how our education system would be if we made sure our children also had their basic needs met.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 16, 2014 8:11 AM

Ojambo has founded a project that addresses the extremely sad issue of orphans who have lost their parents to AIDS. These children need help because they do not have parents to support them, leaving them with their Grandparents who struggle to support these children. This video made me think of AIDS in Africa in a different way. When I thought of AIDS in Africa, I always focused on how many people were dying and how tragic that was. I seldom thought of the people they were leaving behind and what their death would mean to those still living.

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Animated U. S. Population Pyramid (1950-2010)

Animated U. S. Population Pyramid (1950-2010) | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is a simple, yet incredibly powerful graphic that helps to show the changing nature of population structure as a country moved to a different stage in the demographic transition (the link takes you to the animated version).  


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Raven Blair's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:19 AM

This population pyramid of the United States in 1976 show that there were many younger people there are under 25. The largest percent of the people, by age separation, are around the age of 10-15, which could be a result of the Baby Boom in 1964. Eventually, our population pyramid may become upside-down because as the larger population groups move up the pyramid based on their age, they start to have less children, which means a smaller base. 

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Detroit: The 'Shrinking City' That Isn't Actually Shrinking

Detroit: The 'Shrinking City' That Isn't Actually Shrinking | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
We're often told that Detroit has been abandoned—but the metro area is stable, and addressing sprawl is still a challenge...

 

Population size and physical size...not always as correlated as one might assume in this age of urban sprawl.  This details some of the difficulties in revitalizing abandoned sections of a city when the economic motive to expand outward is so easy. 


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Wyatt Fratnz's curator insight, May 26, 2015 8:59 PM

This article investigates the possibilities of the progression of the city of Detroit, despite all the negative connotations. They show us the math behind it's decreasing populations along with it's past expansion, what's behind it and the urban sprawl of it all.


This is a great real-world example of uneven development, zones of abandonment, disamenity, and gentrification. It goes to show how all of these factors afflict with the city as a whole.

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Sustainable cities must be compact and high-density

Sustainable cities must be compact and high-density | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
George Monbiot: As the balance of the world's population tips from rural to urban, we need strict urban planning to keep cities from collapse...

This article provides perspectives on the future of urbanization and the ecological framework within which we build our cities. 


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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 9, 2012 8:47 PM
This article makes me think about the organization of urban demographics in Rhode Island. It puts into question the significance of the invisible lines that separate the boarders of Cranston, Central Falls, Pawtucket, Providence and East Providence today.
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Daily Show: The Amazing Racism - Geographical Bigotry

Wyatt Cenac reports on racially charged geographical names in America.

 

Discretion is advised since there is some offensive language in this comedy sketch.  Yet underneath is a serious point about racially insensitive toponyms and their legacy in the United States (recently in the news with Gov. Perry in Texas).  Geographer Mark Monmonier tackles this topic in his book, "From Squaw Tit to Whorehouse Meadow: How Maps Name, Claim, and Inflame."


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PBS video: Last Train Home

PBS video: Last Train Home | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Every spring, China’s cities are plunged into chaos as 130 million migrant workers journey to their home villages for the New Year in the world’s largest human migration.

 

The cultural importance to New Year's and the massive migratory shift is an incredible topic worth looking at.  The full video is online only until Oct 27th. 


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BandKids13-14's curator insight, September 16, 2013 10:15 AM

This happens every spring. Most people don't even get to visit their family, but they risk their lives in the chaos of the world's largest human migration to spend Chiniese new year with them. Life is pointless of they can't spend new years with thier family. They are just trying to help out their family by getting a "decent" paying job. And the most important time in China they don't even get to spend with their families. ~Jessica