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Body Ritual of the Nacirema

Body Ritual of the Nacirema | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Written by Harold Miner, the Body Ritual of the Nacirema was written in part to parallel an early 20th century cultural anthropology report on a culture this can be used to discuss culture and different perspectives of culture groups.  This could be very fun, especially waiting to see when the "aha" moment comes and they understand just who the Nacirema are (the SPOILER will be embedded in the comment section).  It is lengthy and written as academic paper, so for K-12 use, I'd recommend using snippets and having them work in groups to analyze the seemingly bizarre cultural rituals of the Nacirema.  


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Seth Dixon's comment, November 11, 2011 7:17 PM
**SPOILER ALERT** The NACERIMA are is modern American society (American spelled backwards). This little bit of information drastically changes the reading.
Seth Dixon's comment, November 14, 2011 9:05 PM
The "Nacirema" are "American" spelled backwards (or interpreted backwards).
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NPR: Saudi Women Drive Change Despite Mixed Signals

Authorities continue to go after women who flout Saudi Arabia's ban on female drivers, but King Abdullah has pledged to give women more political power in the coming years.

 

This article focuses on public space and differentiated cultural norms that created deeply gendered spaces that are onerous to navigate. Gender, Place and Culture are all intertwined.   


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Asia's rise -- How and When?

"TED Talks Hans Rosling was a young guest student in India when he first realized that Asia had all the capacities to reclaim its place as the world's dominant economic force."

 

Regions, cultures and economies are not static in this era of globalization.  However, in the United States we are accustomed to a position of prominence that is assumed to be a 'birthright.'  The data presented here shows how countries such as India and China might "catch up" to the United States and United Kingdom later in the 21st century (2048?). 


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cookiesrgreat's comment, April 12, 2012 6:54 PM
India could out pace China in the Global Market, but it needs to address its infrastructure, Islam-Hindu conflict and become a first world country not a third world sidekick.
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More resources on Delicious...

More resources on Delicious... | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

A fantastic AP Human Geography Teacher is compiling geography education links and thematically organizing them into 'stacks.'  It is still a work in progress but is reaching a point of being more useful and organized. Use either the 'stack' or links' to locate websites that are useful for AP Human Geography and other geography courses.  Good job David! 


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Google Maps "Real-Time"

Google Maps "Real-Time" | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This doesn't exist, but as we image geospatial technologies of the future, this is a glimpse into what real-time satellite imagery streaming could potentially look like (I understand some of the technical hurdles, this is sci-fi). This still image is a sorry visual approximation for this dynamic visual rendering; follow the link for the video version of this imaged, futuristic landscape. 

 


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Dania's comment, November 13, 2011 1:21 AM
This future google maps “real-time” application will be very interesting because it will convenience for my thing however in the other side it will be a violation of private. Insurance companies could use it against you or for you defend, the same in the case of FBI or other state office or government Issues. Everyone will uncover and public to everyone. It is something to think about it.
Seth Dixon's comment, November 13, 2011 3:27 AM
While I don't think we are anywhere near the satellite coverage to mimic millions of video cameras simultaneously filming earth at high resolution, it is fun to imagine the possibilities. Yet it is also a big concern depending on who could potentially access this data.
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What Will Be Left Then?

What Will Be Left Then? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

A fun thought exercise touching on the themes of energy, resources, consumption and sustainability.  We all know that we are consuming resources quickly; if we (globally) continue at the same rate of consumption, how long with certain resources last?  If a is child born now, what resources would be gone when s/he is a middle aged?  A senior citizen? See the animated version here: http://www.amanda-warner.com/samples/whatleft/  


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Tornado Satellite Imagery: Before and After

Tornado Satellite Imagery: Before and After | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Compare before and after satellite images of tornado damage in Alabama.

 

This is an older image from the Tuscaloosa tornado (April 2011) but still a powerful representation of natural disasters and their impact of both the environment as well as urban systems.   Using current geospatial technologies in the classroom helps to solidify the idea that geography is much more than "just capitals and landforms" in a student's mind. 


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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 6:06 PM

This certainly adds to the concept that geography is much more than capitals and landforms. Geography of a certain area can change someone's entire life, as seen for people who live in the tornado region. Natural disasters have a huge impact on the lives of many as we can see through the recent disasters the US has faced.  Geography not only helps to define these regions but how to detect the disasters and how to recover and collect data from them.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, September 12, 2015 2:23 AM

This interactive map gives you really clear insight into the damage a tornado can do. I found it amazing how clearly you could trace exactly where the tornado touched down and traveled. I had always imagined that their winds alone would just wipe out the whole town. While I am sure other structures in the area had impacted damage to, I was amazed at the difference in damage, between where it had traveled and the surrounding areas. There is a clear line of absolute complete destruction and just some damage. It looks like the tornado literally ripped up the ground wherever it touched...very neat. 

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Worldmapper: The world as you've never seen it before

Worldmapper: The world as you've never seen it before | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Worldmapper is a collection of world maps, where territories are re-sized on each map according to the subject of interest."
Among the many compelling cartograms on this site is this one showing the prevalance of HIV.


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Lou Salza's comment, September 26, 2012 9:04 PM
Love the visual impact of this map especially for kids with learning differences!
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How Economic Inequality Harms Societies

"http://www.ted.com We feel instinctively that societies with huge income gaps are somehow going wrong. Richard Wilkinson charts the hard data on economic inequality, and shows what gets worse when rich and poor are too far apart..."


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The Evolution of Western Dance Music

The Evolution of Western Dance Music | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"An Interactive Graphic Showing The Evolution of Western Dance Music Over The Last 100 Years in Under 20 seconds..."

 

Excellent visualization of diffusion as well as cultural syncretism in the pop cultures affiliated with globalization.  


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Seth Dixon's comment, November 4, 2011 8:36 PM
Thanks to one of my favorite people at my table at the APHG reading in Cincy for posting this link on FB.
Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 9, 2011 3:12 AM
This is a great visual to demonstrate the connection between cultures. We are such a diverse society and I think it is very important to be interconnected with other cultures and be aware of them. Looking at that visual it demonstrates with each year going by more and more pop culture gets connected with other countries.
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Richie Sowa's Man Made Island

Bringing a whole new meaning to the terms "your own private island" and the "creation of place."  An intriguing hook for discussing human and environmental interactions and what resources are needed to sustain life.   


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Seth Dixon's comment, November 4, 2011 2:52 PM
Thanks to "LF ric" for this link...super cool and something I would have never dreamed of (but wish I did).
Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 9, 2011 3:03 AM
Love this video! I think this is amazing!
Michael Aria Mosaffa's comment, February 21, 2013 3:36 AM
this is quite amazing and remarkable! But how does he use the restroom, does he like squat ovoer the edge or something? Or how does he get purified water? How does he get meat? Does he know how to make a fire without a match? How does he get enough food for him, 2 cats, a dog, 2 chickens, and a duck? Besides those questions I think he is a brilliant mad-man!
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TED Talk: Wade Davis on endangered cultures

TED Talks With stunning photos and stories, National Geographic Explorer Wade Davis celebrates the extraordinary diversity of the world's indigenous cultures, which are disappearing from the planet at an alarming rate.

 

This is a fantastic look at indigneous cultures around the world.


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Jesse Gauthier's comment, December 8, 2012 10:21 PM
The first thing that struck my attention in this video was when the speaker said that other cultures teach us about alternative ways to orient ourselves, as humans, on Earth. I never thought about cultures in that sense. When I would look at another culture that is much different from my own culture I just couldn’t comprehend their way of life. But, each culture is just using the Earth’s resources in many various ways, making us not so different in the end. It also makes it much easier to comprehend stranger cultures than our own.
Don Brown Jr's comment, December 11, 2012 3:27 AM
This video brings to light a real dilemma concerning the “plight” of indigenous cultures in the modern world. The forces of globalization has been accelerated by improvements in communication and transportation technologies which have made interaction seem almost instantaneous compared to previous centuries. Yet, this globalized world is changing our notions of significance and attachment to place due to this relative ease of mobility. I have to acknowledge that this is something the indigenous cultures haven’t lost. As Davis clearly explains, the relative isolation that these societies adapted to is becoming increasingly difficulty to maintain, as the forces of global economic integration is binding the world closer to gather (whether people like it or not).
Also another issue that concerns me revolves around the unintended consequences of trying to preserve these cultures. It is possible that we may be accelerating their extinction as external pressure from us may cause these indigenous cultures to become specialized areas which eventually become subject to “exotic” tourism and research, inevitably changing the culture of what was intended to be preserved.
John Caswell's curator insight, February 6, 2014 2:59 PM

Important watch.

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AP Human Geography Course Page

AP Human Geography Course Page | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

An excellent AP Human Geography course page with many solid resources.  The bulk of the resources (activities, graphic organizers, articles, etc.) is within the "unit files" and therefore thematically arranged.  Thanks for sharing your resources; you make Windsor High School proud!    


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Language on Twitter

Language on Twitter | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
API Cartographer Eric Fischer plots language shapefiles of Twitter.

 

Some other images show how social media cuts across place, time and culture and communications have 'defeated' geography to unite the world.  This image (besides looking pretty) shows that culture and place still matter within our increasingly interconnected globalized communications.  There are some very real creating obstacles to diffusion and even if the technology exists for "one huge conversation," there are non-intersecting conversations because of cultural and community differences. 


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Emily Bian's curator insight, October 3, 2014 10:13 PM

This is a thematic map showing the different languages spoken on Twitter in Europe. This Europe thematic is really neat to look at, but it also shows globalization in that Twitter is everywhere, and people are more connected because of it. This increases interactions between people living in different countries, and even different continents. 

            3) language and communication

This will help future APHUG students, because Twitter is relatable to a lot of teens and it will open their eyes to the different languages spoken across Europe and the world, and it's not just English. It connects them to the rest of the world. 

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IPEVO P2V Document Camera

IPEVO P2V Document Camera | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

IPEVO P2V is a sleek, affordable ($69) and powerful document camera that is also highly portable.  This is very high on my Edtech wish list.  If you can't wait for funding to come through for technology into your classroom or an ELMO, this might be a nice solution.


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Stratalogica®

Stratalogica® | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In the United States, roughly half of today’s classrooms have an interactive whiteboard. As the leading producer of maps and globes for schools, Herff Jones-Nystrom saw in this an opportunity to deliver geography, history and other social studies content to educators and their students in a new and innovative way. StrataLogica® is their revolutionary web-based product that delivers layers of age-appropriate, curriculum-based content for use in the classroom, library or home."


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What happens when you flush a toilet in the world's tallest building?

What happens when you flush a toilet in the world's tallest building? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Dubai, in the United Arab Emirates displays an image that is hyper-modern, sophisticated and technologically advanced.  The "Mall of the Emirates" even has a ski lift in it.  Dubai is now home to the tallest skyscraper in the world, matching that image perfectly.

 

But is this perception that is carefully choreographed the full picture?  When you flush in this magnificent building, the waste is removed by truck.  This jarring juxtaposition of cosmopolitanism and under-developed infrastructure shows an intriguing glimpse to the inner workings of urban and economic geographies of the UAE.      


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 4, 2014 6:04 PM

This is an interesting article of cities growing so fast that their infrastructure literally cannot keep us. In Dubai and in India, large skyscrapers are in charge of disposing their own waste because there isn't infrastructure put in place to support them. This seems like a worrisome situation. If these countries don't find a way to build infrastructure to support such large upscale developments then they will find themselves in dire straights. As of now trucks can wait up to 24 hours to dispose of their waste. If these developing cities keep growing the problems will only be amplified more. 

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 2014 7:28 AM

This article highlights an interesting concept, the building up and improving of structures without the industry and logistics to truly support it. In Dubai not only to many have great deals of money but they want to rest of the world to know it as well. This is a immense modern building with state of the art features, all except waste management. Here the buildings have simply cropped up faster than the ground work can be built. In this case all the waste has to be trucked out everyday because their is seemingly no septic or sewer system attached to the building's plumbing.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 7, 2015 9:46 PM

In the worlds tallest building where does the septic go but down when there is no drainage system? Thats right down and into a holding tank located somewhere within the building then emptied out byt a truck. Once emptied this truck takes it to a sewage plant where it can wait for hours. Some implicationsof this in a city that has developed so fast is that not all things were sorted out to make use of the best possible way. This could also cause a health risk for the people working within the buildings. This is a very outdated source of sewer removal in a very rich city.

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Studying "Green"

Studying "Green" | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Green is an unusual film. It is both a hard hitting portrayal of the causes and consequences of deforestation in Indonesia, and a film which captures the tranquillity and calm of wild nature. It contains no narrative or dialogue and yet helps us understand complex commodity chains. Green needs to be taken seriously.  In these pages we present a series of short essays in response to the film." 

 

'Green' is a female orangutan in Indonesia, beset with deforestation and resource exploitation of her habitat.  This is a non-profit film follows her; watch at the film’s website or view the trailer: http://www.greenthefilm.com/

 


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Vanuatu: Meet The Natives

"Five men from the remote Pacific island of Tanna arrive in America to experience western culture for the first time, and force us to look at ourselves through brand new eyes..."

 

This cross-cultural experiment reinforces numerous stereotypes, but also seeks to get viewers to look at issues from a variety of perspectives.  Folk cultures, modernization and globalization are all major themes of this show.     


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Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 11, 2015 12:14 AM

This reminds me of what we learned in class about American people or white folks in general go to a native island and want to see the natives uncivilized and not up with the times of technology, clothes, homes made of up to date material. They want to see grass skirts, old tools, tribal living. The white folks see modern times already they want to see old things.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 14, 2015 5:19 PM

I think exercises like this are really cool, there are a lot of these experiments that go on with culture swaps and I always find the reactions when returning home to be probably the most interesting, just like in this video it is a large celebrations and it helps to put things in perspective

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 15, 2015 1:42 AM

This is a show that is based on how we see and view daily life of native people as compared to our own. How ever I feel as though this show is more based on the how these people actually live rather then adapting and learning to the area that they are in. It does show how globalization plays an important role in the show.

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NPR: In The Hills Of Rio, Shantytowns Get A Makeover

Rio de Janeiro, which is hosting soccer's World Cup in 2014 and the Olympics in 2016, is trying to remake its hundreds of favelas.

 

There are urban geography applications obviously, but what about the cultural, political and economic logic of purging the slums before "the world comes to visit?"  We've seen this recently in Beijing and in other sites of international events.  Why now?  Why not before?   


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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, October 7, 2013 2:02 AM

The facelift that Rio de Janeiro is receiving in anticipation of the World Cup in 2014 and the Olympics in 2016 is sapping up a large amount of Brazil's resources, resources that some lower class Brazilians argue should be allocated to improving roads or schools. The government led make-over reminds me of the upper-class driven gentrification of urban areas in places like NYC that were previously neighborhoods for lower-class residents. I don't think we will be able to understand the effects of this remodeling until after the Cup and the Olympics have come and gone. If Brazil keeps it up and continues to "improve" outlier areas, what will Brazil look like in 20 years?

Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 16, 2013 6:04 PM

There are urban geography applications obviously, but what about the cultural, political and economic logic of purging the slums before "the world comes to visit?"  We've seen this recently in Beijing and in other sites of international events.  Why now?  Why not before?  

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 4:21 PM

I find it sad that although Rio de Janiero obviously has a huge socioeconomic gap between the wealthy and the poor, it takes the prospect of the World Cup and Olympics for them to act. Furthermore their solution to cover up their slums is short sighted and they refuse to look at the deep seeded roots of the issue.

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Geography online games

Geography online games | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"World geography quizzes from Sheppard Software- over 250 fun map games teach capitals, country locations, and more. Also info on the culture, history, and much more."


This has numerous regional quizzes with a wide variety of skill levels making this the perfect 'Goldilocks' activity (student will need to explore, finding that some activities are too easy, some are too hard, before they find the skill level that is just right).  

 


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BatchGeo: geocoding to create custom maps

BatchGeo: geocoding to create custom maps | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Make maps from a list of multiple addresses, create a mobile optimized map or locator. Free hosting for your custom interactive map or locator." 

Super easy to use, you can paste addresses from a spreadsheet to produce maps with your own data.   For a video about how to use BatchGeo see: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RiGSw9VccOo&feature=player_embedded


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Kim Vignale's comment, November 16, 2011 4:14 AM
Geocoding can give anybody the power to create their own maps of locations they encounter on a daily basis. It can help organize different groups and locations that are visited often. This is a great tool to create a visually appealing and organized map. If this program can be integrated with your gps device, it would make it easier to find a location with a click of one button.
Seth Dixon's comment, November 17, 2011 12:09 AM
Considering how easy this is to use, I think that many are scared away from making their own maps since it sounds harder than it really is. This brings mapping power to the people.
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Power of Place: Geography for the 21st Century

Power of Place: Geography for the 21st Century | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The Power of Place: Geography for the 21st Century teaches the geographic skills and concepts that are necessary to understand the world. Geography educators and content experts from around the globe shed light on the physical, human, political, historical, economic, and cultural factors that affect people and natural environments. Maps, animation, and academic commentary bring into focus case studies from 50 sites in 36 countries."

 

A well-known resource for geography teachers, but the list would feel incomplete without this great archive of 26 videos from around the world.  


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BBC: Urbanization

BBC: Urbanization | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

A fantastic interactive map with population charts that show the massive explosion in urbanization since 1950 until the present.


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Seth Dixon's comment, November 4, 2011 3:22 PM
Thanks to my mentor teacher (when I was a student teaching myself in Utah with 9th graders) for finding this link. He's STILL helping me out all these years later...here's to all you mentoring the next generation of educators!
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Map My Followers

Map My Followers | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is a great site that combines the power of geography, social media and geospatial technologies.  You can map where your twitter followers are (if they make the data publicly available).  Additionally, you can pan, zoom and identify specific followers and map their networks.  Can you find yourself on this map (followers of @APHumanGeog)? 

 


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