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The Geography of Stuck

The Geography of Stuck | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
America can be divided into two distinct classes, the stuck and the mobile...

 

Migration as a simply a function of push factors and pull factors needs to be more fully fleshed out.  Not everyone is equally able to move freely (as those of you with mortgages can attest to) and that has a strong spatial relationship within the United States. 


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Mapping migration-China and India

Mapping migration-China and India | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Where are the world's biggest Chinese and Indian immigrant communities? MORE Chinese people live outside mainland China than French people live in France, with some to be found in almost every country.

 

The two most populous countries in the world, India and China, are mentioned frequently when teaching population geography.  However, it is typical in the United States to pass over these countries when discussing migration; this graphic shows the diasporas are quite extensive and highly influential. 


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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 8, 2012 7:47 PM
I wonder if improvements in communication technology and transportation may hinder many immigrants ability to gradually integrate into the nations they have migrated to and thus create demographically distinct areas.
Canberra Girls Grammar GSSF's curator insight, September 1, 2013 10:41 PM

Unit 2

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Immigration to U.S. From Mexico in Decline Amid Tough Economy

Immigration to U.S. From Mexico in Decline Amid Tough Economy | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The number of Mexicans leaving for the United States is just about cancelled out by the number returning, according to statistics provided by the Mexican government.

 

Besides being an important (underreported) political fact, this new migratory pattern can lead to a good discussion of push and pull factors that lead to the geography of migration. 


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Latinization of Southern Space and Place

Latinization of Southern Space and Place | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Latinization of Southern Space and Place project investigates how the myriad discourses of migration and globalization have become manifest graphically across social spaces and street graphics in the contemporary American South.

 

As local demographics change, so does the cultural landscape and--as evidenced by Alabama writing the toughest anti-immigration law in the U.S.--the political landscape.   


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NYTimes: One Roof, Three Generations

NYTimes: One Roof, Three Generations | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
In a converted apartment building in Chinatown, five adults and seven children blend traditional values and rituals with modern roles and responsibilities.

 

This article from the New York Times by Sarah Kramer leads to many cultural question worth exploring.  How does migration impact the culture of families?  How is culture maintained and reproduced?  Why is maintaining cultural connection so vital to these families?  


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Interactive maps Mexico-USA migration channels

Interactive maps  Mexico-USA migration channels | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
In several previous posts we have looked at specific migration channels connecting Mexico to the USA: From Morelos to Minnesota; case study of a migrant...

 

An excellent way to show examples of chain migration and the gravity model...students will understand the concepts with concretes examples. These interactive maps have crisp geo-visualizations of the migratory flows.


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Benjamin DeRita's comment, September 24, 2012 10:28 AM
For the majority of regions the migration percentages are seemingly obvious and to be expected. However, am surprised to see a region such as Guerrero have a high concentration of relocation to Raleigh, NC. Also Guerrero seems unique where it has no clear dominant destination compared to many of its neighbors. Outside of Chicago (1) the next four cities are essentially receiving equal migration.
Blake Welborn's curator insight, November 11, 2013 7:35 PM

This map shows  some of the flows of migration out of Mexico into the US. Provides insight on the immigrant migration and where there are large concentrations of immigrants. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 24, 12:30 PM

These maps show where Mexicans are migrating to in the United States and their state of origin through consulate registration. Though there is an obvious large amount of migration to the border states of Texas, Arizona, California, and New Mexico, there is a significant amount of migration to other, more distant states, particularly from more Southern Mexican states. For example, the top three cities visited by Mexicans of Chiapas are Raleigh, SC; Atlanta, GA; and Orlando, FL. Additionally, large numbers of people from Guerrero and Puebla are heading to Chicago and New York City respectively.

 

These maps are interesting and it is likely that the high migratory numbers to far away American cities are an indication of family and community bonds established in these cities, there could be a number of other factors which contribute to these figures.

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Why Foreign Students are Hired for Alaskan Fish Processing Jobs

Why Foreign Students are Hired for Alaskan Fish Processing Jobs | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Foreign students come to Alaska under a special cultural exchange visa.

 

Globalization, migration, culture and economics all merge in this issue...good for bringing things together as a "synthesis" piece.  


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Interactive Map: Where Americans Are Moving

Interactive Map: Where Americans Are Moving | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
More than 10 million Americans moved from one county to another during 2008. The map below visualizes those moves. Click on any county to see comings and goings: black lines indicate net inward movement, red lines net outward movement.

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Mark V's comment, August 27, 2012 8:15 AM
I thought this was interesting showing the flight from the northeast and midwest
Natalie K Jensen's curator insight, January 30, 2013 7:45 AM

This is a dynamic illustration of international migration in the US that fits nicely within Chapter 3.

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Top 10 Reasons Alabama’s New Immigration Law Is a Disaster for Agriculture

Top 10 Reasons Alabama’s New Immigration Law Is a Disaster for Agriculture | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Alabama’s new immigration law, H.B. 56, is already devastating the state’s agricultural sector."

 

Does teaching agriculture have to be boring?  This particular issue is an excellent current topic that combines politics, culture and demographics within agriculture.   

 


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Mac steel's comment, March 8, 2013 7:09 AM
Technoloy
Valorie Morgan's curator insight, November 7, 2013 7:13 AM

The new immigration laws have caused farmers to cut back on crops due to low empolyment rate. The immgrants that were currently working for farmers, ran off in fear of being captured. I'm against this law, I see exactly where the farmers are coming from. I believe these laws are pointless, it's just people trying to make an honest buck in the hot sun. Alabama is losing a great deal of agriculture due to this new law. Even though, they say its againast the law. I don't see the point. Why be so hard on these farmer??

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 18, 2013 9:08 PM

This article shows how important it is to follow the natural way of agriculture. With the new laws in Alabama being passed it now allows people to grow crops in an unnatural way which is devastating predicament to the agricultural world. 

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Migration in America - Forbes

Migration in America - Forbes | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
More people left Phoenix in 2009 than came. The map above visualizes moves to and from Phoenix; counties that took more migrants than they sent are linked with red lines. Counties that sent more migrants than they took are linked with blue lines.

 

I've sent this link out before, but Forbes now has four articles attached to interactive mapping tool that analyze the data (including one by geographer Michael Conzen).  Also the new data has been added and the visualization has also been improved...very cool features with tremendous amounts of teaching applications. 


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The Crew's curator insight, September 16, 2013 7:18 AM

This is mainly about migration in the states . There is alot of movement that goes unseen . People move for better jobs and opertunities also people move for their jobs. People even move in the same county just differnt location. Many people leave to go to the big cities . -Landon ;) 

Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 17, 2013 6:32 AM


I've sent this link out before, but Forbes now has four articles attached to interactive mapping tool that analyze the data (including one by geographer Michael Conzen).  Also the new data has been added and the visualization has also been improved...very cool features with tremendous amounts of teaching applications.

Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 9:36 AM

This map makes sense. Most of the areas in blue are the areas which are filled with diversity and mixed cultures. The areas in red or more rural or subarb areas which probably are filled with (not all) but lots of racist people who wouldn't normally accept mixed groups. This map kind of tells a lot about politics too, because most of where the migrants are settling is normally where a lot of Democrats tend to be, vs. the red and ALSO, the areas with neither blue or red, tend to vote more Republican. I also think it's interesting to see how the people who are mostly coming in our scattered around, but most stayed in the middle or east coast of the map. And the red areas are the west coast and the southern part of the east coap and the map.

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After Alabama Immigration Law, Few Americans Taking Immigrants' Work

After Alabama Immigration Law, Few Americans Taking Immigrants' Work | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
ONEONTA, Ala. -- Potato farmer Keith Smith saw most of his immigrant workers leave after Alabama's tough immigration law took effect, so he hired Americans.

 

Geography is all about the interconnected of themes and places.  This issue in Alabama is displaying these interconnections quite vividly.  Economics, immigration, culture, politics and agriculture are intensely intertwined in this issue.   


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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 29, 6:57 AM

This is another article that highlights the skill deficit in this country.  People seem to be afraid of doing hard work and would rather do nothing then work hard to learn this skill.  If it were a choice between no job and this type of job people would take the jobs but the third choice of unemployment payments makes people who might do these jobs decide not to.  As long as they are paid more to not work then work, they will not do the jobs that need workers.  The farmer made a good point that a skilled picker can make $200-$300 a day but an unskilled worker doing the job makes only $24 a day.  The work ethic of this country needs to be changed, young people today do not want to work hard or put in the effort.  When farmers can no longer get workers how long will it be before there is a food problem as well as a worker problem in this country.  It is possible to make a good living doing these types of jobs but not as long as people feel the work is beneath them or they are unwilling to do the hard manual labor required to do the job well.

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PBS video: Last Train Home

PBS video: Last Train Home | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Every spring, China’s cities are plunged into chaos as 130 million migrant workers journey to their home villages for the New Year in the world’s largest human migration.

 

The cultural importance to New Year's and the massive migratory shift is an incredible topic worth looking at.  The full video is online only until Oct 27th. 


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BandKids13-14's curator insight, September 16, 2013 7:15 AM

This happens every spring. Most people don't even get to visit their family, but they risk their lives in the chaos of the world's largest human migration to spend Chiniese new year with them. Life is pointless of they can't spend new years with thier family. They are just trying to help out their family by getting a "decent" paying job. And the most important time in China they don't even get to spend with their families. ~Jessica  

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Summit will bring leaders together to discuss region's 'brain drain'

Summit will bring leaders together to discuss region's 'brain drain' | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
An upcoming summit in Huntingburg, Ind.will bring together rural community leaders to tackle the issue of 'brain drain.'...

 

This issue of brain drain is not only one that impacts less developed countries, but it is also visible in rural parts of the developed world on a smaller scale.   Fundamentally, it is a geographic issue as the economics, job opportunities and cultural amenities impact the demographic profile of places. 


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Drug war sparks exodus of affluent Mexicans

Drug war sparks exodus of affluent Mexicans | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Tens of thousands of well-off Mexicans have moved north of the border in a quiet exodus over the past few years, according to local officials, border experts and demographers.

 

The migration from Mexico to the USA has slowed tremendously in the 21st century, but due to the drug violence, the demographic profile of the migrants has changed significantly. 


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 16, 2013 8:20 AM

This is change is the immigration from Mexico will also change the deographics of the area into which they are moving.  Higher incomes, more businesses, more employment in that area that will hopefully spread to other areas.  This is an unforseen result of the drug wars and although it is a positive result, the violence will need to stop.  As it improves the economic situation in the US it worses in the area of Mexico where these type of people are needed.  Legitimate businesses are leaving Mexico leaving a vacume that is going to be filled by the cartels, which will make the problems grow.  While this is a postive for the US in the areas where they are moving to, it is also a negative for Mexico and in the long run a negative for the US.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 24, 12:02 PM

This article is about a recent rise in affluent Mexicans immigrating to the United States to escape the drug war violence in Mexico. These wealthy Mexican immigrants are in stark contrast to the stereotype of the poor illegal-boarder-crossing Mexican immigrant. They come to the United States and live in expensive homes, drive fancy cars, and invest in business. While these immigrants are a boon to the United States economy, Mexico is losing some of the most important citizens; the ones with the wealth to create jobs.

 

The article highlights just how damaging the drug cartels are to Mexico's future.

Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 10:22 AM

Despite Mexico making improvements to make Mexicans want to stay below the border. The drug trafficking violence does make people want to leave. Tens of thousands of well-off Mexicans, wealthy businessmen and average Mexicans are fleeing Mexico and have moved north of the border in a quiet exodus, and they're being warmly welcomed, unlike the much larger population of illegal immigrants. Mexicans are fleeing cartel wars that have left more than 37,000 Mexicans dead in just 4 years, 

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Gates of Vienna--Anti-Muslim immigration sentiment in Europe

Gates of Vienna--Anti-Muslim immigration sentiment in Europe | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This website is one I've always referenced to highlight the growing trend of right-wing/anti-immigration parties in Europe (I DO NOT CONDONE THE IDEAS OF THE BLOG OBVIOUSLY).  After the terrorist attack in Norway, it was discovered that this particular blogger was enormously influential on the thinking of the terrorist.  Why Gates of Vienna?  In his words, "At the siege of Vienna in 1683 Islam seemed poised to overrun Christian Europe. We are in a new phase of a very old war." 

 

The Demographic Transition, Migration and politics all merge in this geographic restructuring of Europe.


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