AP Human Geography Education
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Agriculture and Rural Development Day UN Climate Talks

Agriculture and Rural Development Day UN Climate Talks | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Farmers are at the forefront of dealing with climate change around the world. How are they coping, and what opportunities do the shifts present?

 

An excellent set resources discussing the plight of farmers various regional and ecological situations.  From the famers in Mozambique impacted by unreliable rainfall to Guyana farmers at risk from rising sea fells, climate change is impacting the most vulnerable (and the least responsible) the hardest.  


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NYTimes: The Geography of Thanksgiving Foods

NYTimes: The Geography of Thanksgiving Foods | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The terms cooks enter into search engines can provide clues as to what dishes are being cooked around the nation.

 

Some fascinating (if not entirely scientific) maps that show the most common searches on www.allrecipes.com and regional differences in food preferences.  More importantly, it also is an interesting glimpse into the geography of language.  Some similar dishes are called by more regional names (e.g.-"Stuffing" in the Northeast and West, "Dressing" in the Midwest and South).  This set of maps also reinforces the concepts of regions.  This is a fun way to teach some actual content and enjoy the holiday.


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Top 10 Reasons Alabama’s New Immigration Law Is a Disaster for Agriculture

Top 10 Reasons Alabama’s New Immigration Law Is a Disaster for Agriculture | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Alabama’s new immigration law, H.B. 56, is already devastating the state’s agricultural sector."

 

Does teaching agriculture have to be boring?  This particular issue is an excellent current topic that combines politics, culture and demographics within agriculture.   

 


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Mac steel's comment, March 8, 2013 10:09 AM
Technoloy
Valorie Morgan's curator insight, November 7, 2013 10:13 AM

The new immigration laws have caused farmers to cut back on crops due to low empolyment rate. The immgrants that were currently working for farmers, ran off in fear of being captured. I'm against this law, I see exactly where the farmers are coming from. I believe these laws are pointless, it's just people trying to make an honest buck in the hot sun. Alabama is losing a great deal of agriculture due to this new law. Even though, they say its againast the law. I don't see the point. Why be so hard on these farmer??

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 12:08 AM

This article shows how important it is to follow the natural way of agriculture. With the new laws in Alabama being passed it now allows people to grow crops in an unnatural way which is devastating predicament to the agricultural world. 

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Feeding 7 billion & our Fragile Environment

Feeding 7 billion & our Fragile Environment | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This photoessay puts together a diverse set of issues that are interconnected.  Industrial agriculture and metropolitan pollution; rising energy prices to sustain consumptive lifestyles with environmental degradation linked to oil spills; regions susceptible to climate change and regions producing that change...thought-provoking.  


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Daniella Tran's comment, February 21, 2013 11:03 PM
I had always known that the amount of humans on this planet was way too much, but i had never realized that our daily consumption of all these resources can result in the issues that are shown in these pictures. These pictures show areas that are highly polluted and it is overwhelming to think that the beautiful earth that we live in is filled with images like that. The number of factors that affect our environment is countless, especially with the growing figures of pollution, waste, use of natural resources and food production. The photo that stood out to me the most from this collection, is the one where the polar bear had to resort to eating a polar bear cub. It is difficult to think that the polar bear did that act as a sign of desperation because of the lack of food affected by the changing environment.
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After Alabama Immigration Law, Few Americans Taking Immigrants' Work

After Alabama Immigration Law, Few Americans Taking Immigrants' Work | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
ONEONTA, Ala. -- Potato farmer Keith Smith saw most of his immigrant workers leave after Alabama's tough immigration law took effect, so he hired Americans.

 

Geography is all about the interconnected of themes and places.  This issue in Alabama is displaying these interconnections quite vividly.  Economics, immigration, culture, politics and agriculture are intensely intertwined in this issue.   


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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 29, 2014 9:57 AM

This is another article that highlights the skill deficit in this country.  People seem to be afraid of doing hard work and would rather do nothing then work hard to learn this skill.  If it were a choice between no job and this type of job people would take the jobs but the third choice of unemployment payments makes people who might do these jobs decide not to.  As long as they are paid more to not work then work, they will not do the jobs that need workers.  The farmer made a good point that a skilled picker can make $200-$300 a day but an unskilled worker doing the job makes only $24 a day.  The work ethic of this country needs to be changed, young people today do not want to work hard or put in the effort.  When farmers can no longer get workers how long will it be before there is a food problem as well as a worker problem in this country.  It is possible to make a good living doing these types of jobs but not as long as people feel the work is beneath them or they are unwilling to do the hard manual labor required to do the job well.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, January 28, 2015 12:26 PM

i see this as a very good law. America is on the verge of recovering from an economic recession and the United States can benefit from every job given to a natural born american citizen. i do see the problems that a  farmer can have such as receiving a decline in profits if they must pay more for the product. in the article the farmers also say that Americans just do not work like seasoned Hispanics and production is way down. another looming problem that the Americans have is that they are slow, and want to call it a day after lunch, and expect to get paid more. 

Kendra King's curator insight, February 2, 2015 5:36 PM

As the title implies, this is about how Americans are not cut out for doing intensive farming jobs because the workers just quit quickly. A few politicians mentioned in the story, Governor Robert Bentley and Senator Scott Beason, said they received thank you messages from constituents who found work. This was supposed to be evidence of Americans benefitting from jobs that immigrants took, but I would love to know how many of those people actually stayed with the job. Furthermore, I find it a bit too suspicious that none of the people wanted to speak with the press as the author mentioned or that the names just weren’t given. I am more inclined to believe the owners of the famers mentioned in the article, who said they can’t keep Americans on their site happy due to lack of pay and benefits. Mind you now it wasn’t just one owner who said this either. I think this is telling as well because the owners are the individuals who best know the industry as they work it every day.

 

From the farmers perspective the new law is now a huge problem that could also affected consumers. They lost steady “Hispanics with experience,” who they knew could handle the work. For some farmers, according to the article, has made it so the produce is left on the vine rotting because it isn’t picked. So in essence, what the Arizona law just did was harm agriculture and the buyers too because if enough of that food perishes the price will go up. Now I can understand a state being aggravated over illegal immigration (it is a serious problem that is nowhere close to being solved), but to pass a law with these kinds of economic ramifications isn’t really helping the situation much either. As much as people hate to admit it, our economy needs immigrants from Mexico for our agriculture sector to work. It is just a little known fact.

 

The new law isn’t the only law at issue in this article. Connie Horner of Georgia tried to legally hire workers through the government’s visa program. She soon found it is too costly for her to do and too time consuming, so instead Ms. Horner is turning to machines. The fact that visas are that hard to attain for workers is also part of the reason the immigrants come illegally. Rather than spending more money to watch the boarder how about the government figure out a way for the bureaucracy of the immigration process to move quicker. This isn’t an issue of 2011 either when the article was written. Listening to the news, I have heard farmers complain about the visa program for years. No wonder immigrants come over illegally and then citizens get angry at these people. Really, American’s should be more annoyed with their government’s ineffective stance on boarder control. 

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China's farming history misapplied in Africa

China's farming history misapplied in Africa | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Sub-Saharan Africa is being sold misguided agricultural policies based on hybrid seeds and chemical inputs.

 

Written by Bill Moseley, a geography professor from Macalester College, this is a fantastic example of the importance of not simply using a mass-produced "one-size-fits-all" approach to economic develop and agricultural policies throughout the world.  (Not so) Surprisingly, geography, place and local context matter. 


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Cam E's curator insight, March 18, 2014 12:38 PM

This is a big deal for me, as I'm always interesting looking into the far future for humanity as a whole. It's very important that a mistake is not made with the vast agricultural power that lays in the soil of Africa. Experiments with hybrid seeds and new technologies can yield a higher production, but at a cost we are not yet fully aware of. Many years down the line it's unclear as to what the result of this sort of farming will be, and I believe the last thing we want to do is to put all our eggs in one basket with this situation, as it could yield a worst case scenario where most of earth's farmland becomes useless for the purposes of growing due to an unforeseen long-term consequence of artificial seeds and the like. We should pursue technology with all haste and push forward without fear, but we need a reliable backup in case things go wrong.

 

Wyatt Fratnz's curator insight, March 19, 2015 10:22 PM

This article first tells us about the different regions in Africa agriculturally, dealing with famine, economic, and distributive conflicts. It then tells a story about the famine killing 36 million in Chins, and how they would strategically select crops from the West in attempt to produce another "Green Revolution". Experts are saying that Sub-Saharan Africa should follow in their footsteps, but the two nations have many social, economic, and especially agricultural differences.

 

This write-up says a lot about how nations react to situations such as famine, and the distribution of goods aside that. Different nations have different abilities agriculturally and use these toward their peoples and social crisis's.  

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NYTimes: The Geography of Food

NYTimes: The Geography of Food | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
It’s a myth that chips are cheaper than broccoli. They’re not. So what’s stopping people from eating more healthfully?

 

Is junk food really cheaper?  Is that economic factor the only one that has led to increasingly obesity rates in the Unites States?  What about cultural changes to families' division of labor within the house?  Agricultural changes in production as well as urban systems of consumption all play a role in this complex system.  Economics, culture, urban and agriculture are all interconnected in this article.    


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Seth Dixon's comment, September 25, 2011 10:44 PM
For a while now I've been thinking about this issue since I may or may not have had my obesity issue to deal with (okay, I did). People that say "it's society's fault" f...ail to own up to their personal responsibility and fail to recognize that we are "things to act, not things to be acted upon." At the same time, those that pretend that is is 100% about individual choices fail to account for the social context and the structural situations that lead to so many Americans falling into the same unhealthy patterns. That many people means the problem is both structural (a societal issue) and individual. I guess it isn't a surprise that a geographer thinks that the issue is present on multiple scales is it?

As a follow up, you can read a CNN article about economical ways to address healthy living in the poor urban environment. http://www.cnn.com/2011/HEALTH/09/15/cnnheroes.keatley.nutrition/
Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 4, 2013 2:31 PM

A great article about the food chrsis going on in america. When looking at this fast food trend as a whole its effects extend greatly across the ecnomy. First off the fact that there are 15 fast food resturants to every grochary store is so obsured beacuse studys have proven it cost less to buy food at the store and cook it at home then to eat out at fast food resturants, but who are the poeple eating out at BK the low income familys. Also the fact that such a large amount of food i need to prodce the deamand it has effeced the agrucltual ecnomy beacuse if farmes want to be able to sell there potatos in bulk to these restuansts, they have to  be grown a certain way. So it not just one cheep meal here and there it consistant meals at places like these that has begun to reshape the ecnomy and agruclutral market.

megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 2:10 AM

The biggest excuse for obese Americans today is that junk food is cheaper than healthy food. This is actually false now that i read this article. They even use the example that if you go to McDonalds for dinner and got burgers, chicken nuggest, fries, and sodas it would cost 28.00. Or you can serve a roasted chicken, vegetables, salad, and milk for 14.00. So there is one example of how that stereotype is false. I understand there are things that you can buy that are healthy that are expensive but that is what comes with everything.

 

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How Big a Backyard Would You Need to Live Off the Land?

How Big a Backyard Would You Need to Live Off the Land? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Tags: infographic, food, agriculture, sustainability, urban, urban ecology, locavore, land use, unit 5 agriculture, unit 7 cities.


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Crissy Borton's comment, September 11, 2012 8:36 PM
Looking at purchasing a house in the next year or so and this is one thing we have been looking at. Although we don't want to raise our own meat we would like to grow everything else we eat.
Courtney Holbert's curator insight, February 3, 2013 10:44 PM

Good visual representation of what it would take to be self sufficient.

Chris Scott's curator insight, July 14, 2013 9:51 AM

If you need a backyard that is about 2 acres to live off the land imagine how big of a backyard you would need if you had a family of 8.

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In-Depth Series: Rice 2.0

In-Depth Series: Rice 2.0 | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
A closer look at a tiny grain, with a giant footprint.

 

As the most important food source in the world, we must pay more attention to the geography of rice production and consumption.  


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GIS Lounge: Thanksgiving Maps

GIS Lounge: Thanksgiving Maps | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Want to know where your Thanksgiving food comes from? 

 

This provides the geography of holiday food production with links to the data so you can map out the data with GIS (links produced by Western Illinois University). 


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abontempo's comment, January 30, 2012 2:13 PM
This is so interesting! I never really thought about how our thanksgiving meal is so different from others around the world!
Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 28, 2014 2:52 PM

T-giving map stuff...

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The Geography of Hunger and Food Insecurity

Why are some communities more vulnerable to hunger and famine? There are many reasons, which together add up to food insecurity, the world's no.1 health risk...

 

Excellent summary of the geographic factors that lead to food insecurity and hunger and the main ways NGO's are trying to combat the issues.   This is an incredibly complex problem that, at it's heart, is a geographic issue that can challenge student to synthesize information and make the connections between topics.  


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, December 5, 2011 1:02 AM
This is a incredible clip that does challenge students to synthesize information and make the connections between topics, but it can also help students to realize making a difference at a early age is important. I learned an abundance of facts just from watching, it was informative and intriguing. As I was watching the video I was thinking of ways it can be incorporated into the classroom. This video could get students to learn about the world's number one health risk. Incorporating it into the classroom by holding a food drive, or having a school wide fundraiser to donate to the British Red Cross is also another way to help. Getting our future minds informed and helping the community will make an impact in the future.
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Richie Sowa's Man Made Island

Bringing a whole new meaning to the terms "your own private island" and the "creation of place."  An intriguing hook for discussing human and environmental interactions and what resources are needed to sustain life.   


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Seth Dixon's comment, November 4, 2011 10:52 AM
Thanks to "LF ric" for this link...super cool and something I would have never dreamed of (but wish I did).
Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 8, 2011 10:03 PM
Love this video! I think this is amazing!
Michael Aria Mosaffa's comment, February 20, 2013 10:36 PM
this is quite amazing and remarkable! But how does he use the restroom, does he like squat ovoer the edge or something? Or how does he get purified water? How does he get meat? Does he know how to make a fire without a match? How does he get enough food for him, 2 cats, a dog, 2 chickens, and a duck? Besides those questions I think he is a brilliant mad-man!
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Video: "EAT" by Rick Mereki

Foods from around the world...This is a playful video clip that leads students to have more questions than answers about different places.  The spirit of exploration and experimentation is at the heart of this global traveler's montage of delightful dishes.  Watching this encourages viewers to open their minds to new ideas, cultures and places. 


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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 7:58 PM

Watching this video made me hungry hahaha. This video is a good example of why we should try different food. Living in the united state has giving me the opportunity to learn about different culture. I feel that  if we try different food we are not only becoming less judgmental but we are also contributing economically. We don’t have to go to Italy to enjoy a great pizza. We can go stay here and spend our money here. At the long run it will help our economy to grow more efficiently. Made In America!!!

Alison Antonelli's curator insight, December 4, 2013 9:48 AM

This is an interesting video because some people are extremely particular with what they eat. I like this video because it makes the viewers of the video wonder what they actually could be missing out on with all of the wonderful food they could be consuming. 

Courtney Burns's curator insight, December 8, 2013 1:55 PM

Even though this video barely had any words it still said a lot. It showed so many different foods from so many different places. It was pretty awesome to see the different foods that different cultures put together. One thing that I thought was funny was when the guy was eating the candy apple with popcorn attatched to it. I've had a candy apple and I've had popcorn, but never together. It would be intersting to know what country that was from. Also another thing that really cuaght my eye in the video was when the guy ate the cricket! What country eats crickets as part of their meal? That is so crazy. Meals really do tell a lot about the culture of a particular place. It is amazing to me that just from a simple dish you can learn so much about a countries culture. The first thing I always do when I go somewhere new is try the food. I have to say I loved Italy!

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CSMonitor: Anti-immigration bill, farming and unemployment

CSMonitor: Anti-immigration bill, farming and unemployment | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Farmers in states like Alabama that have passed strong anti-illegal immigration laws are fighting back, saying they are losing labor and that US workers are unwilling to take up farm work.

 

The connection between immigration, job availability and the recession is not as straightforward as some pundits make it out to be.  Why aren't Americans taking these jobs?  What does that tell us about our economy and the recession?  What does this tell us about migrant labor? 


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Rural US Disappearing? Population Share Hits Low - ABC News

Rural US Disappearing? Population Share Hits Low - ABC News | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Ghost Towns: Rural U.S.Disappearing...

 

1910: 72% of USA rural

2010: 16% of USA rural

 

This stark reversal has profoundly reshaped our society.  The patterns noted in Peirce Lewis's 1972 classic article "Small Town in Pennsylvania" have just continued and accelerated.  Critical questions: What forces are driving the change?  What other parts of society are impacted by this shift?


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Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, January 30, 2015 3:41 PM

I think society itself evolves from the past. Alot of new ventures emerge and society adapts to that. Alot of rural areas have evaporated as a new force of urban planning has emerged where more developed cities have increased and more small cities are being recognized and developed into a more open society. Ghost towns are being more destroyed and created into a opportunity where a driven society will create businesses  for people with no jobs.

WILBERT DE JESUS's curator insight, February 12, 2015 6:44 PM

People move from rural areas to urban areas in the US. This pattern has shifted the notion the founder fathers had when creating this great nation when they envisioned a mostly farming society where people own the land.

Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 28, 2016 2:38 PM

New article URL link here

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50 Percent of Food is Wasted-SIWI

50 Percent of Food is Wasted-SIWI | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) is a policy institute that seeks sustainable solutions to the world¡¯s escalating water crisis.

 

This is an excellent bit of information to keep in mind when discussing agricultural systems and methods of food production.  Why does this happen? How can we reduce that our waste? 


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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 23, 2012 10:59 AM
I could only assume that we could come up with better processes of distributing food. Food lost in the field is inevitable to some extent, but there are many ways we could save some just by being more careful. It's understandable that we have a great need for food with 7 billion people on the planet, but that doesn't mean we should expedite things as far as to waste 50% of it.. Even if we only purchased enough to hold us over to the next grocery trip, rather then more just in case, we could help effect this problem.
Jolyn Chia's curator insight, January 24, 2014 9:22 PM

From this article,i can see that more and more people are wasting food. we should not waste food as some other people in other country have no food to eat, and we should really be grateful for what we have and what others dont. when we are wasting food, we must always remind ourselves that other people are not as fortunate to have food to eat, or they might have food that come from the rubbish chute, they wont get enough nutrition. The food that we wasted will be treated as precious stuff in their eyes. I aslo learn that we can help reducing waste by only ordering the portions we think we can handle, and try not to waste food.