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Let's keep it postive!

Let's keep it postive! | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Every state has to be best at something right?  Even Rhode Island gets the lowest coal consumption per capita award (be nice, we already have an inferiority complex).  This map is purely keeping in positive.   But, if you need to know (and I'm sure your students would love you know), here is also a list of what every state is the worst at in this map entitled the United States of Shame:

http://pleated-jeans.com/2011/01/24/the-united-states-of-shame-chart/


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Interactive Map: The Economy Where You Live

Interactive Map: The Economy Where You Live | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The fallout from the recession has cut deeply into the housing security, employment and income of many Americans. But some parts of the country are clearly faring better than others.

 

Do your own local and regional analysis of household incomes, unemployment and foreclosure rates.  What patterns surprise you?  What geographic factors explain the economic situation?     


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Pearl Harbor Attack Map - National Geographic Education

Pearl Harbor Attack Map - National Geographic Education | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Pearl Harbor Interactive (Do you want to learn more about the events of December 7, 1941?

 

Where and when did the Pearl Harbor attack take place?  How did geographic factors play a role in the battle?


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Migration in America - Forbes

Migration in America - Forbes | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
More people left Phoenix in 2009 than came. The map above visualizes moves to and from Phoenix; counties that took more migrants than they sent are linked with red lines. Counties that sent more migrants than they took are linked with blue lines.

 

I've sent this link out before, but Forbes now has four articles attached to interactive mapping tool that analyze the data (including one by geographer Michael Conzen).  Also the new data has been added and the visualization has also been improved...very cool features with tremendous amounts of teaching applications. 


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The Crew's curator insight, September 16, 2013 10:18 AM

This is mainly about migration in the states . There is alot of movement that goes unseen . People move for better jobs and opertunities also people move for their jobs. People even move in the same county just differnt location. Many people leave to go to the big cities . -Landon ;) 

Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 17, 2013 9:32 AM


I've sent this link out before, but Forbes now has four articles attached to interactive mapping tool that analyze the data (including one by geographer Michael Conzen).  Also the new data has been added and the visualization has also been improved...very cool features with tremendous amounts of teaching applications.

Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:36 PM

This map makes sense. Most of the areas in blue are the areas which are filled with diversity and mixed cultures. The areas in red or more rural or subarb areas which probably are filled with (not all) but lots of racist people who wouldn't normally accept mixed groups. This map kind of tells a lot about politics too, because most of where the migrants are settling is normally where a lot of Democrats tend to be, vs. the red and ALSO, the areas with neither blue or red, tend to vote more Republican. I also think it's interesting to see how the people who are mostly coming in our scattered around, but most stayed in the middle or east coast of the map. And the red areas are the west coast and the southern part of the east coap and the map.

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Mother Jones magazine: Economic inequality in the USA

Mother Jones magazine: Economic inequality in the USA | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
A Harvard business prof and a behavioral economist...

 

This is an interesting graphic highlighting the strong economic imbalance in the United States, and that the imbalance is much greater than most citizens (and presumably students) believe it to be. 


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What your state is the worst at – United States of shame

What your state is the worst at – United States of shame | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

And the United States of Awesome, what any state is best at.  This could lead to some humorous, but also engaging discussion--hopefully without the negative stereotypes.  Thanks Danbury HS! 


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Cam E's curator insight, January 29, 1:46 PM

Many interesting things on this map! I'm not surprised to see that Rhode Island comes in number one in drug use, growing up I always was aware of how easy it was to get through friends of friends, and it is a big part of even the High School culture. I thought it was the same everywhere until I began to venture out. Massachusetts having the worst drivers adds cruel truth to the idea of "Massholes," but I was born there myself and I do love the place, as horrible as it is to drive in there. I've personally found Boston easier to drive in than Providence, but that might be just because I'm one of them and don't know it!

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Visualizing US expansion through post offices.

This is a visualization of US expansion in North America from 1700 to 1900, seen through changes in the spatial distribution of post offices.

 

This is a fantastic time lapse map that shows historical trends of spatial expansion and  it is perfect to demonstrate HOW diffusion works. 


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New Balance struggles as last major athletic shoe brand still manufacturing in U.S.

New Balance struggles as last major athletic shoe brand still manufacturing in U.S. | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Nike? Gone. Adidas? Gone. New Balance, the last major athletic shoe brand still manufacturing in the United States, fights to keep jobs here."   This is an excellent portal for discussing outsourcing, deindutrialization, sectors of the economy and globalization. 


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Stacey Jackson's comment, February 7, 2013 5:51 PM
I had no idea that New Balance still manufactured their shoes in the US. Sadly, I assumed they were made overseas as most textiles are these days. I'll have to go out and buy a pair of New Balances now.
Cam E's curator insight, January 29, 2:03 PM

The United States, known for its industrial prowess in the past, has become a shadow of what it used to be. Our economy has taken a major turn to a majority service oriented one, with about 70 percent of our GDP coming from Consumption rather than production. Even since the year 2000 the US has lost around 32 percent of its manufacturing jobs. All that can be said through my limited knowledge on the topic is that a nation which switches from production to consumption will likely fall behind others on the path of technological advancement.

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User Friendly GIS for U.S. Census Data

User Friendly GIS for U.S. Census Data | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Mapping America: Every City, Every Block."  Browse local data from the Census Bureau's American Community Survey, which was conducted from 2005 to 2009.  This is super easy to use for students accustomed to internet browsing. 


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USATODAY.com - Topography of religion

USATODAY.com - Topography of religion | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

An excellent visual aid to process the religious data in the United States.  Roll the cursor over the map (after clicking on the link) to see any particular state's religious data.  What patterns do you notice?  Are there religious regions that could be drawn based on this data? 


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Ryan Randomname's curator insight, January 16, 12:43 PM

Khanh Fleshman's insight: This relates to Key Issue #1 because it gives a state-by-state breakdown on religion, and gives more detailed facts about religions in different states by percentages.

 

Vinay Penmetsa: This map shows how the US is dominated by Protestants and Catholics, and all other religions are minority in here.

 

Graham Shroyer's insight: This relates to this section because it shows how religions are distributed around the US and what is dominant and where.

 

Zahida Ashroff's Insight: This relates to Key Issue #1 because it shows the "demographics" of religion as it is distributed accross the U.S. According to the map, Christianity is the most popular donomination in the U.S, followed by Judaism.

Juliette Norwood's curator insight, January 20, 5:02 PM

This post is scooped to show the percentages of the religions and their adherents in the United States. It relates to the section by showing a bit of the distribution through the percentages. 

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Map of the Day: America's Poverty Belt

Map of the Day: America's Poverty Belt | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The poor in the U.S.are disproportionately clustered in a handful of southern states...

 

This image is worth an entire class period of economic geography...


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Religious Geography of the United States

Religious Geography of the United States | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

A set of 2000 census maps that focus on religion in the United States.  Even in secular societies, religion can play an important role within society, both culturally and politically.  Include are links to many more religious maps.  


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Rebecca!Morgan Geography's curator insight, November 21, 2013 1:30 PM
Geography- these maps show the diverse religions and the distribution of them.
Andrew and Tom's curator insight, November 25, 2013 3:11 PM

This map shows the consentration of religion in the US and how ut mainly is in the south.

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Immigration to U.S. From Mexico in Decline Amid Tough Economy

Immigration to U.S. From Mexico in Decline Amid Tough Economy | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The number of Mexicans leaving for the United States is just about cancelled out by the number returning, according to statistics provided by the Mexican government.

 

Besides being an important (underreported) political fact, this new migratory pattern can lead to a good discussion of push and pull factors that lead to the geography of migration. 


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2008 Election maps

2008 Election maps | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Excellent electoral geography maps from the U.S. presidential election of 2008.  What are the major patterns you see?  What do these patterns in say about the politics, culture and demographics about these places?


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The Shifting Geography of Black America

The Shifting Geography of Black America | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"While many northern cities did see anemic growth or even losses in black population, and many southern cities saw their black population surge, the real story actually extends well beyond the notion of a monolithic return to the South."

 

Demographics, culture, scale, region are some of the applications available. 


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What’s your local HDI (human development index)?

What’s your local HDI (human development index)? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A recently-released online tool enables Californians to see where they stand on a “human development index” – a composite measure of health, knowledge and standard of living developed by the American Human Development Project of the Social Sciences..." 

This is cool.  Instead of aggregating the data at the country level and comparing countries, we can see differences in local levels of human development.  Students see patterns of socio-economic and development vividly, and in an intensely local way tailored to their regional frame of reference.   


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U.S. Obesity Trends

U.S. Obesity Trends | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

It's pretty widely known that Americans are becoming increasingly more obese...but there is a geographic context to this phenomenon.  These maps help students explore these factors.   


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Joshua Choiniere's comment, September 18, 2012 3:01 PM
According to this map obesity occurs all over but is more highly concentrated in the South and Mid West area such as Illinios and Michican. While states in the heartland have no "recorded data" and thus there trying to say they are not obese. I think this map is biased and not accurate because it's implied message is that Americans are not truly obese.
Paige McClatchy's curator insight, September 15, 2013 9:15 PM

The section about obesity and socioeconomic status was the most interesting to me, specifically that richer non-Hispanic blacks are more likely to be obese than their poorer counterparts while wealtheir women tend to be skinnier than poorer women. I've always understood obesity to be a problem largely driven by the nutrition of low-cost foods (McDonalds, KFC, etc.) yet these two statistics seem to contradict each other and require I take a more nuanced look at the epidemic. The fact that the South and the Midwest are leading the data in most obese does not come as a surprise to me. Stereotypes of Southern fried chicken and biscuits are coming to mind while my own experience of the Minnesota State Fair (everything on a stick!) makes the statistics jive with my own mindset. 

Maria Lopez's curator insight, February 6, 2:32 AM

It is very interesting yet alarming to see the growing obesity rates in the United States. As a fellow foodie myself, it makes me think twice about what I am confusing. The map shows that the South in particular has seen a large influx in obesity rates while the West Coast has remained the least changed. Both have entirely different lifestyles from one another so that could be a big factor in the difference of obesity rates. In addition, Rhode Island is the only state in New England besides Maine with a sharp increase in obesity rates. This is not good for the state as a whole.