AP Human Geography Education
7.0K views | +0 today
Follow
AP Human Geography Education
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

U.S. Protestants Lose Majority Status

U.S. Protestants Lose Majority Status | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

For the first time in its history, the United States does not have a Protestant majority, according to a new study.

 

Interestingly, this is not due to the rise of a new religious group, but the rise of secularism in the United States. The fastest growing group in the United States is the religiously unaffliliated. Click here for a simplified AP news story on the report. 

 

Questions to ponder: What are some causal factors that might explain why there is an increase in the non-religious population in the United States today? How does this impact American culture and politics?

 

Tags: religion, USA, culture, unit 3 culture.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's comment, October 9, 2012 9:20 AM
And the report outlines that since 2010 (when the chart data ends) Protestants have continued to lose members.
Ali and bradyn's curator insight, December 1, 2013 1:14 PM

A religious article that shows U.S Protestants Lose Majority Status 

 
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Manifest Destiny in 141 Maps

Manifest Destiny in 141 Maps | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This data visualization project is a great way to demonstrate the geographic expansion of the United States.  This is much more interactive than the typical time lapse video since you can scroll through the maps and explore each map through the interactive features. 

 

Tags: historical, USA, visualization, mapping.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Matt Mallinson's comment, November 5, 2012 11:24 AM
I really like the display of these changes in our country throughout the years. It's a great way of showing centuries of change into something easy to understand. This would help young students in a social studies class for sure.
Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 6, 2012 10:35 PM
i LOVE THIS! I can see this being such a valuable tool to use in a classroom. Students get the visual and written representation. Having the visual changes that took place in the United States is a better way to present to the students instead of them just reading a book. Will definitely save this article for future reference.
benjamin costello's curator insight, April 29, 2015 6:36 PM

This is great idea. I wonder if I can use something like this for my project.

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Election Results Map

Election Results Map | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Live election results from The Huffington Post. Romney vs. Obama, Senate, House and ballot measures.

 

This is one of many election maps that I am continually refreshing.  When I lived in California I would always try to stay up for the results--now that I'm on the East Coast I don't think that is going to happen tonight (FYI: I've refreshed this map too many times to count). 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jeff F's comment, November 9, 2012 4:41 PM
I projected this map for President Obama a few months ago. After his first debate disaster I said Florida would probably go to Romney as well.
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

USATODAY.com - Topography of religion

USATODAY.com - Topography of religion | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

An excellent visual aid to process the religious data in the United States.  Roll the cursor over the map (after clicking on the link) to see any particular state's religious data.  What patterns do you notice?  Are there religious regions that could be drawn based on this data? 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rishi Suresh's curator insight, January 16, 2014 12:43 PM

Khanh Fleshman's insight: This relates to Key Issue #1 because it gives a state-by-state breakdown on religion, and gives more detailed facts about religions in different states by percentages.

 

Vinay Penmetsa: This map shows how the US is dominated by Protestants and Catholics, and all other religions are minority in here.

 

Graham Shroyer's insight: This relates to this section because it shows how religions are distributed around the US and what is dominant and where.

 

Zahida Ashroff's Insight: This relates to Key Issue #1 because it shows the "demographics" of religion as it is distributed accross the U.S. According to the map, Christianity is the most popular donomination in the U.S, followed by Judaism.

Juliette Norwood's curator insight, January 20, 2014 5:02 PM

This post is scooped to show the percentages of the religions and their adherents in the United States. It relates to the section by showing a bit of the distribution through the percentages. 

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Map of the Day: America's Poverty Belt

Map of the Day: America's Poverty Belt | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The poor in the U.S.are disproportionately clustered in a handful of southern states...

 

This image is worth an entire class period of economic geography...


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Religious Geography of the United States

Religious Geography of the United States | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

A set of 2000 census maps that focus on religion in the United States.  Even in secular societies, religion can play an important role within society, both culturally and politically.  Include are links to many more religious maps.  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rebecca!Morgan Geography's curator insight, November 21, 2013 1:30 PM
Geography- these maps show the diverse religions and the distribution of them.
Andrew and Tom's curator insight, November 25, 2013 3:11 PM

This map shows the consentration of religion in the US and how ut mainly is in the south.

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Immigration to U.S. From Mexico in Decline Amid Tough Economy

Immigration to U.S. From Mexico in Decline Amid Tough Economy | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The number of Mexicans leaving for the United States is just about cancelled out by the number returning, according to statistics provided by the Mexican government.

 

Besides being an important (underreported) political fact, this new migratory pattern can lead to a good discussion of push and pull factors that lead to the geography of migration. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Max Minard's curator insight, March 23, 2015 8:57 PM

Back in 2012, the number of Mexican immigrants coming to America had declined due to several push factors, mainly involving the rough economy "north of the border". Despite the fact that many Mexican immigrants are still migrating to America, many have decided against this decision based off factors such as the risk of the making the trek and the more evident reason being that America's economy is going through a rough time. They don't want to show up in America unable to find employment which is the reason they had left their previous country. I personally think this is an accurate outlook considering 2012 experienced many rough patches in the economy which can further result in the decrease in incoming immigrants. Overall, this tough and amid economy in America along with the long, risky trek can both be classified as push factors, pushing away Mexican immigrants from wanting to settle in The United States.

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

2008 Election maps

2008 Election maps | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Excellent electoral geography maps from the U.S. presidential election of 2008.  What are the major patterns you see?  What do these patterns in say about the politics, culture and demographics about these places?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Shifting Geography of Black America

The Shifting Geography of Black America | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"While many northern cities did see anemic growth or even losses in black population, and many southern cities saw their black population surge, the real story actually extends well beyond the notion of a monolithic return to the South."

 

Demographics, culture, scale, region are some of the applications available. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
David Lizotte's curator insight, January 24, 2015 4:33 PM

This was a pretty cool article. I liked how it started with this specific census being the least broadcasted/talked about compared to any other census. The first thing that came to my mind once reading this is racism... In either case, it was a good read.

Throughout the article I kept thinking about natural reasons why people move. For example, its too hot, the winter is a burden, but also natural disasters, like Katrina. I know there was a large population of Katrina refugees whom fled to Texas, specifically Houston, right after the Hurricane struck. This of course would explain the sudden increase in the black population of Houston but also why the population has not increased or rather gone down over the past 5-10 years.

Im sure natural disasters as well as the basic weather motivate individuals to move but the socioeconomic reasoning cannot be ignored. For example the article mentioned lower cost(s) of living in certain cities migrated to by African Americans. A cheaper cost of living is attractive to any one person whom is strapped for cash. Social reasoning can be determined through racial issues in certain cities, education, family or rather long distance family/friend relations. 

This article was written in 2011. It would be interesting to view the most recent census in regards to this topic. As well as brainstorm the statistics and why they are... the way they are. 

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What’s your local HDI (human development index)?

What’s your local HDI (human development index)? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A recently-released online tool enables Californians to see where they stand on a “human development index” – a composite measure of health, knowledge and standard of living developed by the American Human Development Project of the Social Sciences..." 

This is cool.  Instead of aggregating the data at the country level and comparing countries, we can see differences in local levels of human development.  Students see patterns of socio-economic and development vividly, and in an intensely local way tailored to their regional frame of reference.   


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Tracey Sarvis's curator insight, November 9, 2014 8:20 AM

Development and HDI

 

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

U.S. Obesity Trends

U.S. Obesity Trends | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

It's pretty widely known that Americans are becoming increasingly more obese...but there is a geographic context to this phenomenon.  These maps help students explore these factors.   


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Joshua Choiniere's comment, September 18, 2012 3:01 PM
According to this map obesity occurs all over but is more highly concentrated in the South and Mid West area such as Illinios and Michican. While states in the heartland have no "recorded data" and thus there trying to say they are not obese. I think this map is biased and not accurate because it's implied message is that Americans are not truly obese.
Paige McClatchy's curator insight, September 15, 2013 9:15 PM

The section about obesity and socioeconomic status was the most interesting to me, specifically that richer non-Hispanic blacks are more likely to be obese than their poorer counterparts while wealtheir women tend to be skinnier than poorer women. I've always understood obesity to be a problem largely driven by the nutrition of low-cost foods (McDonalds, KFC, etc.) yet these two statistics seem to contradict each other and require I take a more nuanced look at the epidemic. The fact that the South and the Midwest are leading the data in most obese does not come as a surprise to me. Stereotypes of Southern fried chicken and biscuits are coming to mind while my own experience of the Minnesota State Fair (everything on a stick!) makes the statistics jive with my own mindset. 

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Earthscapes

Earthscapes | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The U.S. Postal Service celebrates the beauty and diversity of America's landscapes as seen from above with the Earthscapes (Forever®) stamps.Offering an opportunity to see the world in a new way, the 15 stamps are issued in 3 rows of 5, showing 3...

 

These stamps are the perfect way to decorate your letters while showing your love for the Earth and geography. 

 

Tags: images, art, landscape. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Where Does the South Begin?

Where Does the South Begin? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Roads? Religion? Accent? Food? Which factor dictates where the North ends?

 

This is a great intellectual expercise to help student think about regions and how we define them.  The article can help also inform some of their thinking since one of the main problems for students in drawing regional boundaries is a lack of place-based knowledge.   

 

Tags: regions, USA.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:49 PM

Borders... the first thing I think of was a giant bookstore near my hometown... it now ceases to exist, having been replaced by Barnes and Nobel...  As for the political organization of space, I could apply this situation and laugh.  Borders will cease to be, and they will be called after people's last names!  I think this has already happened, when people unite together in countries such as the USA- although borders are specific, the general federal laws and many policies still apply in all states... generally. And people's names are often the namesakes of places.  I don't like the idea of borders, though, it seems like a bunch of warmongers trying to get ahead in a world where they can't truly cheat death, so they cheat other people of land that may have been decreed in ancient documents as property of their ancestors, or even in accordance with the righteousness of the universe and what should be alloted to whom.  Ownership is a concept of denial, because no one can truly own anything, not even our bodies, which contain trillions of infinite universes the size of the large one around us that we commonly refer to.  Borders are relative, and will likely become recognized as obsolete.  I know this was abstract, but it's my thoughts on the topic.

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Let's keep it postive!

Let's keep it postive! | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Every state has to be best at something right?  Even Rhode Island gets the lowest coal consumption per capita award (be nice, we already have an inferiority complex).  This map is purely keeping in positive.   But, if you need to know (and I'm sure your students would love you know), here is also a list of what every state is the worst at in this map entitled the United States of Shame:

http://pleated-jeans.com/2011/01/24/the-united-states-of-shame-chart/


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Interactive Map: The Economy Where You Live

Interactive Map: The Economy Where You Live | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The fallout from the recession has cut deeply into the housing security, employment and income of many Americans. But some parts of the country are clearly faring better than others.

 

Do your own local and regional analysis of household incomes, unemployment and foreclosure rates.  What patterns surprise you?  What geographic factors explain the economic situation?     


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Pearl Harbor Attack Map - National Geographic Education

Pearl Harbor Attack Map - National Geographic Education | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Pearl Harbor Interactive (Do you want to learn more about the events of December 7, 1941?

 

Where and when did the Pearl Harbor attack take place?  How did geographic factors play a role in the battle?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Migration in America - Forbes

Migration in America - Forbes | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
More people left Phoenix in 2009 than came. The map above visualizes moves to and from Phoenix; counties that took more migrants than they sent are linked with red lines. Counties that sent more migrants than they took are linked with blue lines.

 

I've sent this link out before, but Forbes now has four articles attached to interactive mapping tool that analyze the data (including one by geographer Michael Conzen).  Also the new data has been added and the visualization has also been improved...very cool features with tremendous amounts of teaching applications. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rachael Johns's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:21 AM

In this day and age we see more people migrating then staying. People move for numerous things, a trend that causes a lot of migration is when people retire they move to southern Florida. They get tons of sun rays and meet a lot of people their age there. Another reason people migrate is for jobs. If their job tells them they have to move across state they do which causes more migration. ~R.J~

AmandaWilhiteee's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:25 AM

The map is what originally attracted me to this article, but I must admit that the actual article was very interesting. Lots of the moves were from Phoenix, Arizona. Why people moved from Phoenix was not information that was disclosed in the article, but because of that, it made me wonder and want to learn more about this topic. AW :)

Nolan Walters's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:30 AM

I've seen something like this before.  More people leaving a location than entering it.  Something may have caused them to move, Push and Pull factors are both in this.  Job opportunities or the extreme heat of Phoenix may have caused them to leave.  It shows that most people went to the Northeast, where it is cooler and has more people.

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Mother Jones magazine: Economic inequality in the USA

Mother Jones magazine: Economic inequality in the USA | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
A Harvard business prof and a behavioral economist...

 

This is an interesting graphic highlighting the strong economic imbalance in the United States, and that the imbalance is much greater than most citizens (and presumably students) believe it to be. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What your state is the worst at – United States of shame

What your state is the worst at – United States of shame | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

And the United States of Awesome, what any state is best at.  This could lead to some humorous, but also engaging discussion--hopefully without the negative stereotypes.  Thanks Danbury HS! 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Cam E's curator insight, January 29, 2014 1:46 PM

Many interesting things on this map! I'm not surprised to see that Rhode Island comes in number one in drug use, growing up I always was aware of how easy it was to get through friends of friends, and it is a big part of even the High School culture. I thought it was the same everywhere until I began to venture out. Massachusetts having the worst drivers adds cruel truth to the idea of "Massholes," but I was born there myself and I do love the place, as horrible as it is to drive in there. I've personally found Boston easier to drive in than Providence, but that might be just because I'm one of them and don't know it!

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Visualizing US expansion through post offices.

This is a visualization of US expansion in North America from 1700 to 1900, seen through changes in the spatial distribution of post offices.

 

This is a fantastic time lapse map that shows historical trends of spatial expansion and  it is perfect to demonstrate HOW diffusion works. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 13, 2014 12:46 PM

This video is an interesting look at how expansion started in the northeast in the 1700 and slowly extend to the mid-west and even see some spots pop up in the north west before fully reaching that area in 1900.

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

New Balance struggles as last major athletic shoe brand still manufacturing in U.S.

New Balance struggles as last major athletic shoe brand still manufacturing in U.S. | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Nike? Gone. Adidas? Gone. New Balance, the last major athletic shoe brand still manufacturing in the United States, fights to keep jobs here."   This is an excellent portal for discussing outsourcing, deindutrialization, sectors of the economy and globalization. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Stacey Jackson's comment, February 7, 2013 5:51 PM
I had no idea that New Balance still manufactured their shoes in the US. Sadly, I assumed they were made overseas as most textiles are these days. I'll have to go out and buy a pair of New Balances now.
Cam E's curator insight, January 29, 2014 2:03 PM

The United States, known for its industrial prowess in the past, has become a shadow of what it used to be. Our economy has taken a major turn to a majority service oriented one, with about 70 percent of our GDP coming from Consumption rather than production. Even since the year 2000 the US has lost around 32 percent of its manufacturing jobs. All that can be said through my limited knowledge on the topic is that a nation which switches from production to consumption will likely fall behind others on the path of technological advancement.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 2014 11:10 PM

Unit 6

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

User Friendly GIS for U.S. Census Data

User Friendly GIS for U.S. Census Data | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Mapping America: Every City, Every Block."  Browse local data from the Census Bureau's American Community Survey, which was conducted from 2005 to 2009.  This is super easy to use for students accustomed to internet browsing. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.