AP Human Geography Education
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2011 UN Human Development Report

2011 UN Human Development Report | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Human Development Report (HDR) was first launched in 1990 with the single goal of putting people back at the center of the development process in terms of economic debate, policy and advocacy.

 

With a host of links that connect you to videos, charts, statistics about both the present and projections into that future, this is a fantastic resource for any lesson on development. 


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Seth Dixon's comment, December 3, 2011 8:39 AM
Thanks for recooping the link...I think this one will be incredibly valuable.
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Blueseed: Business' New "Spatial Fix"

Blueseed: Business' New "Spatial Fix" | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Many site outsourcing as a way in which global corporatations are seeking to avoid the typical economic limitations that have been imposed on job production based on geography.  Some refer to it as a 'spatial fix,' a way to get around the high cost of workers in the developed world being reworking how business gets done.  

 

This takes that to an entirely different level.  The benefits of agglomeration and collaboration help to explain the importance of Silicon Valley.  Entrepreneurs from other countries do not all have access to a comparable location with a high concentration of intellectually driven enterprises that amplify their impacts.  The Blueseed Project intents to, in essence create a floating city in international waters (just off the coast of California) that is outside of U.S. governmental jurisdiction, but easily accessible for Silicon Valley executives.   

 

More questions than answers arise from this project.  How are economic restructurings altering governance?  Are borders becoming less or more important with increased technological advances?  Would this be a benefit to developing world economies or strengthen the Silicon Valley's economic importance in research and development?     


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Political Geography: Borders

Political Geography: Borders | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The American-Canadian border, famously said to run straight across the 49th parallel for hundreds of miles, is neither straight nor along the 49th parallel.

 

This is a good historical way to discuss the stages of border creation, especially demarcation and delimitation.  The history of where to place a border, as the border itself, is not so straight forward.   


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Clay Bass's curator insight, April 18, 1:06 PM
This relates to Political Geography in AP Human Geography because it discusses a geometric border between the U.S. and Canada. In my opinion, I find it pretty cool how the border between the U.S. and Canada looks like a straight line separating the two countries on a map.
Madison Roth's curator insight, April 21, 12:20 PM
This relates to my human geography class because it talks about a geometric border.The specific border it is speaks of is the United States and Canadian boundary. I think this is odd because it looks straight and is said to run across the 49th parallel when in actuality its not straight or running across the line.
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Images From Freeport Mine

Images From Freeport Mine | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

With the Freeport Mine strike still in the news, this photo gallery of the world's largest gold mine is an excellent set of teaching images.  For more images, maps and aerial photography of the mine see: https://www.google.com/search?q=freeport+mine&hl=en&client=firefox-a&hs=ZFo&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&prmd=imvns&source=lnms&tbm=isch&ei=ze_TTr_VAuL50gGT2qEn&sa=X&oi=mode_link&ct=mode&cd=2&ved=0CB8Q_AUoAQ&biw=1440&bih=768


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iPhone's Siri Has Trouble with Accents

iPhone's Siri Has Trouble with Accents | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

The computer programming is designed to understand voice patterns, but whose voice patterns?  Several accents, ranging from Scottish to Hispanic, are not recognized as "English" by the voice recognition command in the new iPhone.  So what does this mean as we try to understand the culture of technology?  The geography of language?      


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Isabelle Zahn's curator insight, January 2, 2014 7:56 PM

This article applies to language because of the whole accents concept. It als fits into pop culture because it is talking about the phone that millions of people around the world have. In this article it talks about how Siri the i phone voice recognition command can tell many languages and accents. The only accent that Siri cannot comprehend is that of a Latino. This has relevance in many communities because lots of people all over the world have i phones and use Siri including Latinos. In places that is a majority of Latinos the i phone if it wants to really apply to them should be able to understand their accent just like it could of anyone else. Short term effects could be people listening to what Apple had to say and just trying to use it more so that it will recognize them just like it would any other accent. A long term effect would be Apple making Siri understand the accent and maybe do other things with the i phone to make it apply more to Latinos making their market even bigger.

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Philippines Overtakes India as Hub of Call Centers

Philippines Overtakes India as Hub of Call Centers | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Many companies have moved their customer service lines to Manila to take advantage of workers who speak lightly accented English and are familiar with American culture.

 

The geography of globalization is epitomized by relentless change and marked by continual turnover.  Cultural and economic factors play significant roles in creating potential advantages for receiving outsourced jobs (whether that is beneficially long-term is another discussion). 


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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 10, 2013 8:27 PM

Companies have moved their customer service lines to Manila because there the workers speak a lightly accented English and are more familiar with American culture then they are over in India. This shows the maturation of the outsourcing buisness and shows the preference for American English.  

Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 2014 12:41 PM

The fact that so many Filipinos speak English is an important one to understand. This brings jobs to the Philippines, but at the expense of local culture. High income and social standing in the Philippines is often correlated with English, as many of the high-ranking citizens attend universities in the United States and return with degrees, and in turn teach their children English. This marginalizes their own language in a way, and is something to keep aware of, as it's one thing that the United States does not face in many areas, that most other countries around the world do.  

 

Kendra King's curator insight, April 13, 2015 9:16 PM

I was most shocked by how Americanized these individual were. I understand that the Philippines were under American control for a fair period of time, but the country obtained its sovereign independence of the US sometime in the mid-40s. They have had close to 80 years to develop their own history, yet the author mentioned the citizens were still watching shows like “Friends” and speaking American English better than other foreign English speakers. It just goes to show how a colony is permanently marked by their past. I am not entirely sure this is a good thing, but at least one positive that came out of the US’s impact is that in speaking more American English there are more call center jobs. As the article mentioned, the jobs helped their sluggish economy. Still, the only reason these jobs are being offered is due to the amount companies save. Not only do the companies avoid paying American workers, whose salary is much higher, the companies are also in an area with better infrastructure. So even though the article claims the companies paid more because the Philippine workers cost $50 more than those from India, they save money on overhead and have better satisfied customers! Looking at call centers from the company’s perspective shows that this former colony is just a pawn once again. Therefore, when we look at intent, globalization just becomes negative again.   

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Tweepsmap.com

Tweepsmap.com | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

While I prefer the mapping tools of www.mapmyfollowers.com this website, www.tweepsmap.com provides statistics about where your followers are from.  For example, my top four cities are: London, Houston, New York and Providence.  Top countries are: U.S. (46%) U.K. (18%) Canada (4.9%) Australia (4.1%) and Spain (3.2%).  Maps and statistics...what a great combination. 


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Interactive Sistine Chapel

Interactive Sistine Chapel | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

One of the amazing memories of my trip to Europe was visiting the Vatican and developing a kink in my neck from marveling at the ceiling in the Sistine Chapel.  No photography is allowed to preserve reverence in what many consider not only a cultural heritage site, but a holy site.  This link is the next best thing to being in the Vatican staring at the Sistine Chapel.  We might not be able to travel the world with our students, but this can help us bring the world to our classroom.


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Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 2014 10:50 AM

This is a very cool opportunity due to the fact that photography isn't usually allowed in the Sistine chapel. Of course it can't compare to the beauty of the place in person, but in some ways it's almost more powerful as this room is usually filled to the brim with tourists, seeing it empty is a bit more striking as you can appreciate the fool instead of missing it in the crowds of people.

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NYTimes Video: Transforming Gulou

NYTimes Video: Transforming Gulou | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
A government-initiated redevelopment plan will transform one of the oldest neighborhoods in Beijing into a polished tourist attraction.

 

This 2010 video showcases one of China's urban transformation projects.  Urban revitalization plans are not without critics, especially those who see the cultural transformation of a neighborhood they deem worthy of historical preservation. 


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Albert Jordan's curator insight, April 17, 2014 1:20 PM

Progression or destruction? Out with the old and in with the new or the selling of ones soul? Of course those that are affected or disagree will say one thing and those that wish to develop will say another. While many will see this as a desecration of the past; at some point at a larger scale change must come. It is important to realize that China needs to do something with its people, whom are only multiplying. Much of the old towns and structures are not up to modern day standards of safety. As more people need to support themselves and their dependents, they will need jobs. The main, larger cities, can only support so much. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 1:57 PM

Is this not gentrification in China. Old neighborhoods being transformed to suit more profitable ventures. Makes you wonder what will happen to the people who live in Gulou if tourism comes to the area. Furthermore, the identity of Gulou is at risk, if China is to develop old historical areas, I think it would be best to do so in a way that works with in the framework of the existing local culture and preserves the history of the area.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:43 PM

Stories such as this are incredibly sad but also rather controversial, On one side of the issue the Chinese Government wishes to modernize its nation to be able to compete with the other global powers and to do so they seek to rebuild many of its old cities, The other side of the issue is that these cities marked to be destroyed and rebuilt have vast historical significance to both China and the whole region. It seems short sighted of China to destroy their past looking only to the future. 

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Bridging the Digital Divide

This is an inspiring project that seeks to elevate poor slum-dwelling Indians by providing educational resources to children.  As free computer terminals are made available, their literacy skills soar and possibilities are widened.  Visit the projects homepage at: http://www.hole-in-the-wall.com/ ;


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Seth Dixon's comment, November 29, 2011 5:50 PM
This is a fantastic program that I'm excited to hear about...education for the disenfranchised is one of the best vehicles for positive social change.
Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 19, 2013 2:35 PM

As a child, most of us probably didn't particularly learn through technology or computers but through other hands on methods.  In these slums, getting school supplies which we are fortunate to have may not be so easy.  There are just so many people and living conditions make it harder for each child to be benefit equally.  That being said, these computers just might benefit the youth in the long run.  It might not be traditional, or even equal at times yet it is a type of improvisation that can probably be helpful.  In the video you could see the kids waiting in line, wanting to use the touchscreen, wanting to learn.  It is an abstract approach to education, but with the growth and diversity, it just might work effectively.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 16, 2014 8:15 AM

In the United States we take for granted the resources that are so easily accessed like computers. In this poor neighborhood in India, a computer was put in a wall and the children taught themselves how to use the computer. These slum kids don't have the tools needed to get out of poverty. Given them these computers may seem like a drop of water in the bucket but it is an important step.

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NYTimes: The Geography of Thanksgiving Foods

NYTimes: The Geography of Thanksgiving Foods | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The terms cooks enter into search engines can provide clues as to what dishes are being cooked around the nation.

 

Some fascinating (if not entirely scientific) maps that show the most common searches on www.allrecipes.com and regional differences in food preferences.  More importantly, it also is an interesting glimpse into the geography of language.  Some similar dishes are called by more regional names (e.g.-"Stuffing" in the Northeast and West, "Dressing" in the Midwest and South).  This set of maps also reinforces the concepts of regions.  This is a fun way to teach some actual content and enjoy the holiday.


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Al Jazeera: Gaza Lives On

Al Jazeera: Gaza Lives On | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Israeli blockade may have taken a heavy toll on Gazans, but this film reveals life and hope among the devastation.

 

Not a small clip (47 min.), this film was produced to show regular life in the Gaza strip, and the difficulties that endured by Palestinian because of Israeli blockade.  This film shows the cultural resilience of the Palestinians is the face of political sanctions and how the lack of building materials impairs development. 


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Religious Geography of the United States

Religious Geography of the United States | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

A set of 2000 census maps that focus on religion in the United States.  Even in secular societies, religion can play an important role within society, both culturally and politically.  Include are links to many more religious maps.  


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Rebecca!Morgan Geography's curator insight, November 21, 2013 1:30 PM
Geography- these maps show the diverse religions and the distribution of them.
Andrew and Tom's curator insight, November 25, 2013 3:11 PM

This map shows the consentration of religion in the US and how ut mainly is in the south.

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sharegeography.co.uk

sharegeography.co.uk | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is a fantastic resource for all geography teachers that is regularly updated.  With resources that are tailored for the UK's curriculum, it is technologically innovative.  The majority of the links will be found on twitter at #geographyteacher. 


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In-Depth Series: Rice 2.0

In-Depth Series: Rice 2.0 | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
A closer look at a tiny grain, with a giant footprint.

 

As the most important food source in the world, we must pay more attention to the geography of rice production and consumption.  


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Interactive panoramic view of Paris

Interactive panoramic view of Paris | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

From the Eiffel Tower, you can pan and zoom to see the whole city.  This could be a fantastic 'hook' for an urban geography class.  Paris has been the model for so many urban restructuring projects, that this would work nicely as grist for discuss centering on ideas of urbanism (and it's just stunningly gorgeous).  Enjoy playing with this as it is very easy to manipulate and control.   


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elsa hunziker's comment, January 30, 2012 2:19 PM
Feels like you're there! Love this!
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Social Media for collaboration and professional development

Using Twitter hashtags for lesson inspiration...

 

Social Media is changing how educators work together and collaboration.  This short video highlights that teachers need not only collaborate with their peers at their institutions.  Through social media educators can customize powerful networks that are more than just a method for finding ideas; this is the 21st century's informal method to receive professional development.  #geographyteacher is just one of the many ways to start finding resources and other teachers.  


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Latin American integration: Peaks and troughs

Latin American integration: Peaks and troughs | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

The financial crisis surrounding the Euro has led many to feel that supranational organizations and regional coalitions are more trouble than they are worth.  The OAS (Organization of American States-which the USA is a part of) may dissolve and the CELAC might be its successor.  The CELAC's (Community of Latin American and Caribbean States) emergence shows that the United States "is declining in a region it once called its 'backyard.'"  Spain is also diminishing in influence among its former colonies are forging new economic and political ties while Mexico and Brazil are exerting more regional influence. 


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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 21, 2013 10:04 PM

The United States influence is delining in an area it called "its back yard". Along the financial crisis causing this, it has also begun to declin Spains influence in there former colonies as well. I think this could be a good thing as far these areas finally getting out from under other countires control even though they have been free for so long. But it could be bad because know that they are doing things on their own what will they do   

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The Geography of Stuck

The Geography of Stuck | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
America can be divided into two distinct classes, the stuck and the mobile...

 

Migration as a simply a function of push factors and pull factors needs to be more fully fleshed out.  Not everyone is equally able to move freely (as those of you with mortgages can attest to) and that has a strong spatial relationship within the United States. 


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World of Geography at your fingertips

World of Geography at your fingertips | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Worth exploring...this isn't just a single random link.  Geocube is a portal to numerous topics, regions and themes.  

Having been voted by the American Association of School Librarians as one of the "Top 25 websites for Teaching and Learning," Geocube comes highly recommended, and rightfully so (see: http://www.ala.org/aasl/guidelinesandstandards/bestlist/bestwebsitestop25?mid=53 ).  This is a must-see. 


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Dangerous work

Dangerous work | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
In Guatemala City, a place called "The Mine" can deliver both a means of survival and a grisly death. Every day, dozens of residents salvage a living by scouring the massive dump for scrap metal.

 

This thanksgiving I'd like to discuss one of my goals in teaching a geography course in the developed world. I hope to cultivate a sense of thanksgiving and gratitude for the many good things that are easy to take for granted. Balanced with that, I try to teach that economic disparities are NOT a function of moral, mental or physical superiority.  Therefore I try to instill a sense of thankfulness that does not become boastfulness or entitlement--hopefully that ethos will infuse this day's festivities. Happy Thanksgiving!


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sdion's comment, January 30, 2012 2:23 PM
makes me thankful for the jobs i have. i also wonder what the health side effects are of working in these locations. are the workers experiencing shorter life spans or anything like that?
Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 2014 12:28 PM

As someone who has scoured dumps for things before, this sounds like no fun at all! You can find a lot of cool things that are left at dumps, but this doesn't even begin to compare to what they're facing at "The Mine". The smell and possible injuries must be overwhelming. If left untreated, a cut from anything in one of these places could prove fatal.

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, February 12, 2015 6:12 PM

Looking at this situation made me really sad, and made me realize that we take a lot for granted.  Here I am, sitting in a comfy chair, using my thousand dollar Macbook, and these people are risking their lives just to make $20.  They risk everything, in any weather, just for the possibility of finding something that they can sell to support their families, and these are the things no one thinks about.  This isn't to say that anyone's "bad situation" isn't bad for them personally, but this is unbelievable to me.  

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NYTimes Video: China Halts Shipments of Rare Earths

NYTimes Video: China Halts Shipments of Rare Earths | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
In September, China stopped shipping rare earths, minerals crucial to military, cell phone and green technologies, to countries around the world. A report from the Bureau for International Reporting.

 

This 2010 video shows how a primary sector economic activity is reshaping global industry.  Green technologies are dependent on these mining resources and China is the world's rare earth 'superpower.'  Many factories have relocated in China in part because of cheap labor, but also to gain access to these rare earths.   


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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 2014 10:09 AM

This New York Times video discusses China limiting rare earths exports. Rare earths are the heavy elements which are important components in many technologies as they are the best permanent magnets. By limiting the exports, or just completely denying a country like Japan, China sees two benefits. The first, the country gets to keep most of its rare earth resources for itself. China is on the verge of needing massive amounts of rare earths for its own people as the standard of living rises. Secondly, China is forcing many industries to open their factories in China if they want access to the rare earths China has a monopoly on, opening them up to Chinese taxes and tariffs.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 1:57 PM

This video discusses how rare earths are important for a green future. China has halted its shipments of rare earths, which are used in cellphones, laptops and electric cars. China has the largest population in the world and is wise for not exporting an abundance of its rare earths. It is important that the U.S. starts to mine in places such as California for these minerals. Mining may not be good for the environment, but the path to a green future starts in a mine. 

 

Albert Jordan's curator insight, April 17, 2014 1:05 PM

As the video states, China is now realizing its own domestic needs outweighs the desire to export. China needs to go "green" and fast as well as be able to supply its own domestic corporations with the resources they need to supply their own people. An interesting by product of this internalization though, is that it puts its international competitors at a disadvantage. Almost a win-win for them. Japan is a regional competitor and by lowering the amount available to America and Europe, it forces them to speed time and money looking elsewhere. It is both an economic and strategic move, as the civilian needs are important but so are the military needs of rare earths.

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Worker safety in China

This is an incredible video because of the shocking footage of blatant disregard for worker safety.  This can lead to an interesting discussion concerning how China has been able to have its economy grow.  What other ways has China (or Chinese companies) been "cutting corners?"  How does that give them a competitive edge on the global industrial market?     


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, April 2, 2015 9:45 PM

China has one of the strongest economies in the world. However, I think sometimes, China takes that for granted. They think that just because they have a strong economy, they don't have to worry about safe working environments and they have nothing to lose if something happens to someone. As much as I'm sure China gives good paychecks to manufactured workers because of its wealth, there are some jobs, such as this one, that they think they don't have to pay enough. However at the same time, it's not China's fault. Sometimes, it's the workers faults for not using common sense while working, I'm a firm believer in "work smarter, not harder."

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 2015 4:32 PM

Well nobody ever accused China of being a Union favoring country.  These people are risking their lives because its their job.  This is a country where you have very little leeway to argue for benefits.  If they want to do this, then come to the US.  Although I wonder why they don't just use dynamite?  Faster and few people are involved.  

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:37 PM

Based on the video and the safety of the Chinese workers they tame no precautions to staying safe. If they have this much lack of safety for themselves then how do they regard the safety of the people around them. As China is and has cities up and coming to mega cities with high rises and exponential expanding then how do they create their buildings? As fast as they went up and the city was created then how stable are their buildings?

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GIS Lounge: Thanksgiving Maps

GIS Lounge: Thanksgiving Maps | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Want to know where your Thanksgiving food comes from? 

 

This provides the geography of holiday food production with links to the data so you can map out the data with GIS (links produced by Western Illinois University). 


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abontempo's comment, January 30, 2012 2:13 PM
This is so interesting! I never really thought about how our thanksgiving meal is so different from others around the world!
Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 28, 2014 2:52 PM

T-giving map stuff...

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Top 10 Reasons Alabama’s New Immigration Law Is a Disaster for Agriculture

Top 10 Reasons Alabama’s New Immigration Law Is a Disaster for Agriculture | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Alabama’s new immigration law, H.B. 56, is already devastating the state’s agricultural sector."

 

Does teaching agriculture have to be boring?  This particular issue is an excellent current topic that combines politics, culture and demographics within agriculture.   

 


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Mac steel's comment, March 8, 2013 10:09 AM
Technoloy
Valorie Morgan's curator insight, November 7, 2013 10:13 AM

The new immigration laws have caused farmers to cut back on crops due to low empolyment rate. The immgrants that were currently working for farmers, ran off in fear of being captured. I'm against this law, I see exactly where the farmers are coming from. I believe these laws are pointless, it's just people trying to make an honest buck in the hot sun. Alabama is losing a great deal of agriculture due to this new law. Even though, they say its againast the law. I don't see the point. Why be so hard on these farmer??

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 12:08 AM

This article shows how important it is to follow the natural way of agriculture. With the new laws in Alabama being passed it now allows people to grow crops in an unnatural way which is devastating predicament to the agricultural world.