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McDonald's Goes Vegetarian — In India

McDonald's Goes Vegetarian — In India | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
McDonald's plans to open the first in a series of all-vegetarian restaurants in India next year. But rest assured, in most locations around the world, meat will stay on the menu.

 

Many of the most successful global companies or brands use highly regional variations that are attuned to local cultural norms and customs.  The McAloo Tikki burger— which uses a spicy, fried potato-based patty — is the Indian McDonald's top seller.

 

Questions to ponder: What are the forces that lead towards an accelaration of human connectivity around the globe?  What are the postive impacts of this increased connectivity?  What are some negative impacts?  Are these impacts the same in all places?  Explain. 

 

Tags: Globalization, food, culture, unit 3 culture and SouthAsia.


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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 29, 6:20 PM

I am impressed that McDonald's knows their clientele so well! This is a company that will last since it is very globally conscious and therefore can open a restaurant in any country.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, November 10, 5:07 PM

McDonald's adjustment to producing a mostly vegetarian menu for locations in India is a smart business move on their part, and once again displays the positive affects of globalization on a company, but may hurt any of the smaller businesses in the area.

 

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 11, 8:03 PM

This article was really interesting to read especially because I have been working at a McDonalds for almost three years now. McDonalds is huge franchise that is known all over the world. Of course my McDonald's does not serve anything for vegetarians. India has various reasons for going meatless. One is that cows are sacred to Hindus. Also, Muslims who live in the country do not eat pork. As opposed to my location who has a top seller of a Big Mac, India's top seller is a McAloo Tikki burger. This burger is made out of a potato based patty as opposed to ground beef. The company is also planning to open another vegetarian location.

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State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map?

State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers.  Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers."

 

Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, regions, gerrymandering, political, mapping, census, density.


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McDonald's International

McDonald's International | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2:44 PM

This interactive map accurately presents McDonald's processes of cultural adaptation and how that has allowed the corporation to spread to almost every corner of the world. Instead of opening the same exact restaurants with the same menus all over the world, McDonalds analyzes the cultural aspects of food in every location where it is present. This cultural adaptation allows McDonalds to mesh into the food cultures of different places, targeting the types of specific foods that are popular to a specific place. Globalization of McDonalds presents the diffusion of fast food culture. 

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 4:57 PM

This is a really interesting article because it shows how food we're so familiar with varies so much across the world. To many McDonalds is an extremely American thing and the idea that it would adapt to the counties it operates in is unexpected by many. This changing menu makes a lot of sense for the company as different cultures and nations are accustomed to different foods which may or may not mesh with the typical American diet.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 10:45 PM

We talk about McDonalds as a way of Americanizing the rest of the world. These foods show that it may still be the case but local culture is still infused and desired where McDonalds expands to.

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Visited States Map

Visited States Map | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Create a Map of all the places you've been."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 18, 2:17 PM

This is an incredibly limited mapping platform, but if all you want to do is put states of the United States into two simple categories (such as 'states I have visited' and 'states I have not visited'), then this works. 


Tags mapping, 201, edtech, cartography, mappingUSA.

Joy Kinley's curator insight, November 18, 2:55 PM

This is a pretty cool visual representation of the different US states that you have visited.

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, November 19, 9:45 PM

really cool site!

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23 maps and charts on language

23 maps and charts on language | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Did you know that Swedish has more in common with Hindi than it does with Finnish? Explaining everything within the limits of the world is probably too ambitious a goal for a list like this. But here are 23 maps and charts that can hopefully illuminate small aspects of how we manage to communicate with one another."

 

Tags: language, culture, English, infographic.


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Joy Kinley's curator insight, November 20, 8:54 AM

Interesting visual representation of language and their relationships.  Language defines us.  It doesn't just give us a way to communicate but it also limits how we define and describe our world.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 26, 1:40 PM

Mapping of languages...

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Geography Education

Geography Education | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Global news with a spatial perspective:  Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography teachers and students.
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The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place

The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
How alarmist, racist coverage of Ebola makes things worse. A dressing down of the latest #NewsweekFail.

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Christian Allié's curator insight, October 18, 3:33 AM

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The Newsweek story could generate additional prejudice against African migrants, a population that already suffers from greater prejudice than other immigrant groups. In the psychology study referenced above, researchers found that simply manipulating the geographical origin of a hypothetical immigrant group – from Eastern Africa to Eastern Asia to Eastern Europe — yielded significant differences in attitudes in a study population toward the immigrant group.

 

Fear-mongering narratives about Ebola circulating in the popular media can also have a serious effect on knowledge and attitudes about Ebola. Though there are no cases of person-to-person infection in the United States, a recent poll conducted by the Harvard School of Public Health reports 39 percent of Americans think there will be a large Ebola outbreak in the United States and more than a quarter of Americans are concerned that they or someone in their immediate family may get sick with Ebola in the next year. A similar poll conducted for Reason-Rupe had four in 10 Americans saying an Ebola outbreak in the United States was likely, and conservative Americans were more likely to say an outbreak was likely. These two national surveys show Americans are grossly overestimating their risk of infection.

 

The long history of associating immigrants and disease in America and the problematic impact that has on attitudes toward immigrants should make us sensitive to the impact of “othering” African immigrants to the United States in the midst of the current Ebola outbreak in West Africa. Scare-mongering about infinitesimally small risks in one context serves no purpose to the greater good of trying to curb disease transmission and relieve people’s suffering in another context.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 20, 12:40 PM

unit 3 and 4

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 20, 3:29 PM

The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place

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Feeding Our Hungry Planet

"By 2050, the world's population will likely increase 35 percent. But is growing more food the only option—or even the best? National Geographic investigates the challenges and solutions to feeding everyone on our planet, based on an eight-month series in National Geographic magazine.  Visit http://natgeofood.com for ongoing coverage of food issues as we investigate the Future of Food today on World Food Day."

 

Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, unit 5 agriculture.


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Truthbehere2's curator insight, October 17, 10:30 AM

I think I might as well buy some land and plant my own huge garden for this crap coming up and have a fence around my yard too

Nancy Watson's curator insight, October 19, 8:53 AM

Population increase is just part of the story. How do we feed everyone? How will we provide for the needs of everyone?  Can the earth sustain the use of her resources and the impact of our growing needs and output. First we must eat. Can we learn to do that wisely? 

Bella Reagan's curator insight, November 28, 5:48 PM

Unit 2-Population

 

This video was about the growing population in the world and as a result the growing food demand. This video points out that even though more food production seems like the solution, instead other solutions are more logical. Solutions include reducing wastes, preserving forests, being more productive on current farms and more. It states that farming is a huge business but it goes towards more than growing food for people to eat but also for other things like animals and materials. The worlds population is growing and there needs to be a change in food industries to keep thriving. 

 

This relates to unit 2 about population since it is thinking of ways to adapt to the worlds growing population. By 2050 it is predicted that population will increase by 33% and something has to change about food in order for people to stay fed. There is too much food being wasted that if that could be decreased it could make a huge difference. The video made a good point that it's not that we need more food it's that we need to manage and prioritize production.  

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Linguistic Family Tree

Linguistic Family Tree | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"When linguists talk about the historical relationship between languages, they use a tree metaphor. An ancient source (say, Indo-European) has various branches (e.g., Romance, Germanic), which themselves have branches (West Germanic, North Germanic), which feed into specific languages (Swedish, Danish, Norwegian).  Minna Sundberg, creator of the webcomic Stand Still. Stay Silent, a story set in a lushly imagined post-apocalyptic Nordic world, has drawn the antidote to the boring linguistic tree diagram."


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Linda Denty's curator insight, November 9, 7:31 PM

A really wonderful graphic.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 11, 3:21 AM

Linguistic Family Tree

Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, December 2, 9:50 PM

Unit 3 Cultural Patterns and Processes (Language)

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Defining 'the South'

Defining 'the South' | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The Southerners were considerably more certain of which states are their own. While the top few Midwest states barely pulled 80 percent of the vote, nearly 90 percent of respondents identified Georgia and Alabama as Southern, and more than 80 percent placed Mississippi and Louisiana in the South. South Carolina, Tennessee, Florida and North Carolina all garnered above 60 percent."


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 15, 12:22 PM

When I think about the South, I do so in terms of culture. The "southern life style" that I have is extremely warped by being a resident of New England for so long. But when I consider what the South is I usually include the south eastern states until the top portion of Florida. As well as Virginia, Oklahoma, Kansas, and North Eastern Texas. Although Texas seems like it would be the quintessential example of the South, much of the state has a Latin influence that I do not associate with Southern culture.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, November 1, 10:40 PM

When I think of states that constitute as being a part of southern United States, I think of VA, NC, SC, GA, MS, AL, LA, TX, and FL. I never thought of KY as being a state a part of the south. Although its geographical location demonstrate it being relatively close to being in the south, I always thought of KY being a Midwest because of the weather similarities with states that are located in the Midwest.

Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 22, 8:08 PM

Unit 1 nature and perspective of geography 

This map is a map of the p.o.v. of a surveyed group stating what they think the south is. They answered with suprising accuracy overall with some outliers. This map shows the stereotypes of the area that people deem it.

This relates to unit 1 because it shows a perceptual map of an area that isn't truly defined. This is a perceptual map because of its undefined borders and a level of accuracy at the personal level.

 

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America’s most gerrymandered congressional districts

America’s most gerrymandered congressional districts | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
A brief overview of crimes against geography in the 113th Congress.

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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 10:04 AM

This concept is used to favor certain political parties in certain areas. There are rules like the ditrict has to be all connected but they can manipulate the redrawing to make it that a certain party still wins that district.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:29 PM

A showing of the gerrymandering districts of the most absurd kind.

Gerrymandering bases itself off the place of the districts in an attempt to sway voting in favor of one party or another or even for the most equal by dealing with similar human characteristics.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 30, 3:15 PM

unit 4

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The Geography of Language

"Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number. How did we end up with so many? And how do we keep track of them all? Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past."


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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, June 2, 7:45 PM

Not really primary geography but so interesting!

Woodstock School's curator insight, June 4, 6:05 AM

A good teaching tool for explaining the diversity of languages.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 12, 9:38 PM

Geografia Cultural

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Developing World Cities and Population Density

Developing World Cities and Population Density | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Without a question, we are living in an urban era. More people now live in cities than anywhere else on the planet and I’ve repeatedly argued that cities are our most important economic engine. As a result of these shifts, we’re seeing megacities at a scale the world has never seen before.

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Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 27, 12:05 PM
المدن الأعلى كثافة بالسكان على مستوى العالم
Sally Egan's curator insight, June 29, 9:31 PM

Mega cities and the challenges they face for the future is focus in this article. Great statistics on populations and urban densities are also included.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 7:47 PM

APHG-U6

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Where Do Borders Need to Be Redrawn? - Room for Debate

Where Do Borders Need to Be Redrawn? - Room for Debate | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
What parts of the world should rethink their maps? Why and how?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 7, 11:28 AM

Maps are always changing as a new nation gets added and old lines cease to make sense. Territory is claimed and reclaimed.  This series of seven articles in the New York Times explores regional examples of how borders impacts places from a variety of scholarly perspectives.  Together, these article challenge student to reconsider the world map and to conceptualize conflicts within a spatial context.

 

Tags: bordersmapping, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, July 16, 10:53 AM

WOW, some really interesting thoughtdebate points here! very very unit 4

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 7:05 PM

APHG-U4

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Cultural Politics

Cultural Politics | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
A state-by-state look at our cultural politics.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 5, 7:23 PM

While this doesn't say everything about the state of cultural politics in the United States, it does lay out some of the more ideologically charged debates in the new political landscape after the midterm electionsWhat does this Venn diagram say about the state of cultural politics in your state?   The Courts have aided the push for same sex marriages; will that also occur for marijuana legalization?


Tags: narcotics, sexuality, USA, electoral, political.

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Geography of Europe Games

Geography of Europe Games | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 12, 4:57 PM

Toporopa is compilation of different games and app for secondary students to review their geographic knowledge of geography, and learn new concepts in a fun and entertaining way.  It does reinforce the 'encyclopedic' view of geography education, but the games are well-crafted and available in most of the major languages of the European Union.  See a Spanish-language review of the site here.   


Tags: Europe, regions, trivia, games.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 13, 2:24 PM

Flags of Europe is definitely my favorite. Really good games to improve my knowledge of the old continent. 

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 1:59 AM

I thought that this game was really useful for getting to know all different aspects of Europe. I really like how it was separated into a variety of different categories that focused on different things in Europe. Of course I was familiar with the countries category. Some things that I was not familiar with before finding this game was all the bodies of water in Europe. I am now aware of the different lakes, seas, and rivers in Europe. I thought it was really cool how it went into some real detail and included aspects like the ports, volcanoes, monarchies, and the battles. I definitely was not aware with any of these before seeing this game. I think this is a very useful game if you wish to know more about Europe or maybe even if you're traveling there and want to get some background knowledge.

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Here's what 9,000 years of breeding has done to corn, peaches, and other crops

Here's what 9,000 years of breeding has done to corn, peaches, and other crops | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Corn, watermelon, and peaches were unrecognizable 8,000 years ago.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 28, 1:25 PM

I think the term 'artificial' in the image might be misleading and it depends on your definition of the word.  Humans have been selectively breed plants and animals for as long as we've been able to domestic them; that is a 'natural' part of our cultural ecology and has lead to great varieties of crops that are much more suitable for human consumption than what was naturally available.  Long before climate change, humans have been actively shaping their environment and the ecological inputs in the systems with the technology that their disposal.  This is a good resource to teach about the 1st agricultural revolution.     


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, unit 5 agriculture.

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India's Potty Problem

India's Potty Problem | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Which statement is true? 

 

A. 60% of all households without toilets in the world are in India.
B. India’s Muslims are less affected by the sanitation problem than Hindus.
C. India’s lack of toilets is worse than China’s.
D. Lack of toilets in India puts women at especially high risk.


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Matt Davidson's curator insight, November 25, 5:55 PM

a nice article for year 7 (water) and 10 (global wellbeing)

Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, December 1, 5:22 PM

This is very sad to see and know about. Obviously you can see how the lack of sanitation can ultimately lead to innocent people dying or even getting a disease. It is very important to look at the data, and be able to build or giving more toilet to those in need in India. Not only should the Prime Minister do something, but so should those around them and try to help this need. You don't NEED technology, you NEED a toilet. 

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 14, 11:00 AM

While many laugh at subjects like this, this is probably one of the largest issues that India faces today. India's cities as well as its populations  have been growing at alarming rates, making it nearly impossible for sanitation infrastructure to keep up. Almost half of India's population has to practice open defecation, going to the bathroom, or dumping excrement, in less desirable places. Many of the poorer areas are affected by this, because often times people are defecating or dumping in areas such as slums. Besides already having hard lives and poor living conditions, slums have to also deal with an increased rate of sickness due to fecal matter. Hindus are also more at risk because they sometimes view private latrines as unclean and unholy, so they make use of open defecating. India's development depends on increased sanitation measures. Especially since children are some of the most effected by this issue.

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How Many Flyover States Does It Take to Equal One New York City?

How Many Flyover States Does It Take to Equal One New York City? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Don’t let my New York City–centric comparisons hinder your imagination. The interactive at the top of this page lets you visualize how different parts of the country compare in population density.

Click the button at the bottom of the interactive to select Los Angeles County, for instance, and then click anywhere on the map to generate a (roughly) circular region of (roughly) equal population. The population data come from the 2010 census, and the square mileage was calculated by summing each highlighted county’s total area. You can also use New Jersey (the most densely populated state), Wyoming (the least densely populated state outside of Alaska), Texas, the coasts (the group of all counties that come within 35 miles of either the Atlantic or Pacific oceans), and, yes, New York City as the baseline for your population comparison."

 

Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, urban, density.


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Andrew Stoops's curator insight, October 13, 10:16 PM

This map is interesting in that flyover states is something that is not easily defined, at least by me. You could argue that no state is a flyover state because of the industry and businesses within the state itself. I am also curious to know why so few folks live in these areas as I have been to most of these places and they have the social and environmental pull factors important to migration.

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Scandinavian Energy Usage

Scandinavian Energy Usage | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Which countries consume the most electricity per person? You might guess the United States would top the World Bank’s list, but the Nordic countries of Iceland, Norway, Finland, and Sweden are actually at or near the top. Icelanders consume an average of 52,374 kilowatt hours per person per year, Norwegians 23,174 kilowatt hours, Finns 15,738 kilowatt hours, and Swedes 14,030 kilowatt hours. Americans are not far behind, with an average consumption of 13,246 kilowatt hours per person. The Japanese consume 7,848 kilowatt hours.

 

This image is part of a global composite assembled from data acquired by the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP) satellite in 2012. The nighttime view of Earth was made possible by the “day-night band” of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite. VIIRS detects light in a range of wavelengths from green to near-infrared and uses filtering techniques to observe dim signals such as city lights, wildfires, and gas flares. The city lights of several major Nordic cities are visible in the imagery, including Stockholm, Sweden (population 905,184); Oslo, Norway (634,463); Helsinki, Finland (614,074), and Reykjavik, Iceland (121,490).

 

Tags: Europe, energy, remote sensing, development, Sweden, Finland, Iceland, Norway.


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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 16, 8:42 PM

Some very good points are brought up in this article.  Like most others I did not think that the Nordic states were huge consumers of electricity.  They however talk about how the cost of electricity because of alternative energy sources is a lot cheaper than it is in the United States.  Also they are at a much more northern latitude than we are, which means longer darker winters and nights.  This darkness creates a need for the use of more lights.  Even with the larger use of electricity the idea to keep in mind is that they are using a lot more renewable energy sources therefore producing less greenhouse gasses in the process.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 9:06 PM

This map, right from first view, is very indicative of the region.  The geography alone depicts that the area would have more darker hours than a country such as the United States where time zones come into play in large increments.  For example, primetime of electric use in Manhattan does not occur at the same time as the prime time of use in San Francisco. Also the price comes into play.  If the hours of darkness are longer most likely electricity would be cheaper because of the massive need for consumption.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 5, 1:52 PM

Surprisingly, Scandinavian countries have the highest rates of electricity consumption in the world. While this may seem to be a negative factor, most of the countries seem to be okay with higher consumption rates because most of the their energy production is based on renewable sources and have minimal environmental impacts. The countries can also justify the higher consumption because of the more extreme climate and weather conditions require more heat and energy that other places. While satellites can detect that the Scandinavian countries are using more electricity than their neighbors, they are able to justify the need and their methods to get and use their energy.  

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Speaking the “Language” of Spatial Analysis via Story Maps

Speaking the “Language” of Spatial Analysis via Story Maps | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Spatial analysis has always been a hallmark of GIS, the 'numerical recipes' which set GIS apart from other forms of computerized visualization and information management. With GIS we pose questions and derive results using a wide array of analytical tools to help us understand and compare places, determine how places are related, find the best locations and paths, detect and quantify patterns, and even to make spatial predictions."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 21, 7:50 PM

GIS is a key tool in spatial analysis, but it can also be a driving force in using math, science, technology and (yes) geography as interdisciplinary ways of teaching the curriculum.  StoryMaps can be rich with images and videos, but also filled with data at a variety of scales.  What stories can you tell in this rich, visual format?  What visual template shown might lend itself best for that sort of project? 


Tagsmapping, GISESRIgeography education, geospatial, edtech.

Caterin Victor's curator insight, October 29, 12:16 PM

 Not only Spatial, even plain geography is very interesting and important,  but.....not everybody understands, and want to...

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Top 10 Safest Countries In The World In 2014

Top 10 Safest Countries In The World In 2014 | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
This list attempts to pinpoint the 10 safest countries in the world by analyzing the Global Peace Index, or GPI, of each country, taking into consideration homicide rates, levels of violent crime, nuclear capabilities and more.

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Jacques Lebègue's curator insight, May 2, 3:19 AM

L'indice de paix global agrège des facteurs comme le taux d'homicide, celui de crimes violents et autres. On a un bon modèle pas lui, tout près: la Belgique, n°10 de ce classement. En règle générale, à l'exception notable de la Nouvelle-Zélande, il vaut vivre au nord de l'hémisphère nord...

16s3d's curator insight, May 2, 3:50 AM

L'indice de paix global agrège des facteurs comme le taux d'homicide, celui de crimes violents et autres. On a un bon modèle pas lui, tout près: la Belgique, n°10 de ce classement. En règle générale, à l'exception notable de la Nouvelle-Zélande, il vaut vivre au nord de l'hémisphère nord...

Emma Lupo's curator insight, October 20, 9:45 PM

For looking at crime

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22 International Borders

22 International Borders | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Brazil (top) and Bolivia (bottom)."


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Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 22, 12:52 PM

The concept of a political boundary has been developed over many many years into an unbreakable line between two different sets of people with different ideologies, religions, and government styles. The boundary extends into the ground, into the air, and includes any resources within the boundary. These pictures show the different shapes and various lines between countries, and displays the intricacies of boundaries in the world.  

Kampe Kyle's curator insight, May 28, 10:21 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the concept of land use patterns. As certain countries practice deforestation, slash-and-burn and other land use types, bordering countries may take a completely indifferent approach to the land and thus create a contrast.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 1:11 AM

Photographs show how different countries can be even by just the border. Number 3 really stuck out to me that Haiti doesnt have as many regulation reguarding deforestation as the Dominican Republic and its very noticable.

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ArcGIS Organizational Accounts for K-12 schools

ArcGIS Organizational Accounts for K-12 schools | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 27, 12:55 PM

This is a big announcement from ESRI, home of ArcGIS online and other geospatial tools.  They are making ArcGIS online organizational accounts free for all K-12 schools in the United States.  As ESRI spokespeople have said, "this will open up ArcGIS Online far beyond just a public account, by permitting more control of sharing, access to more data, engaging much more powerful analyses, supporting apps like Collector or Explorer, integrating with ArcMap and Microsoft Office, enabling login to Community Analyst, and lots more, with still more on the way."  Click here to request an organizational account for your school. 


Tagsmapping, GIS K12, ESRI, geospatial, edtech.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, May 27, 5:39 PM

This is a big deal.

Diane Johnson's curator insight, May 28, 8:24 AM
I scooped this from Seth Dixon's site.. This is his insight.Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a big announcement from ESRI, home of ArcGIS online and other geospatial tools.  They are making ArcGIS online organizational accounts free for all K-12 schools in the United States.  As ESRI spokespeople have said, "this will open up ArcGIS Online far beyond just a public account, by permitting more control of sharing, access to more data, engaging much more powerful analyses, supporting apps like Collector or Explorer, integrating with ArcMap and Microsoft Office, enabling login to Community Analyst, and lots more, with still more on the way."  Click here to request an organizational account for your school. 

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
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Lies Your World Map Told You: 5 Ways You're Being Misled

Lies Your World Map Told You: 5 Ways You're Being Misled | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Unfortunately, most world political maps aren't telling you the whole story. The idea that the earth's land is cleanly divvied up into nation-states - one country for each of the world's peoples - is more an imaginative ideal than a reality. Read on to learn about five ways your map is lying to you about borders, territories, and even the roster of the world's countries."


Via Seth Dixon
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Sally Egan's curator insight, June 23, 6:32 PM

Amazing stories on the World's changing Geopolitical status. Current stories about disputed borders, unrecognised territories and  newly declared nations.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 29, 9:41 PM

Nunca é "Toda a Verdade" ... 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 7:49 PM

APHG-U1

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
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The Language of Maps Kids Should Know

The Language of Maps Kids Should Know | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The vocabulary and concepts of maps kids should learn to enhance their map-skills & geography awareness. Concise definitions with clear illustrations.

 


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Anita Vance's curator insight, June 30, 8:54 AM

This article helps give an early start to map skill implementation - even at the earliest levels.

DTLLS tutor's curator insight, July 1, 5:04 AM

Love this website. Not just this article, but the whole idea. Have a little browse around...

wereldvak's curator insight, July 6, 2:53 PM

De taal van de kaart: welke  woordenschat hebben kinderen nodig om de kaart te kunnen lezen?