AP Human Geography Education
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Restless America: state-to-state migration

Restless America: state-to-state migration | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Approximately 7.1 million Americans moved to another state in 2012. That’s over 2.2% of the U.S. population. The United States has a long history of people picking up and moving their families to other parts of the country, in search of better livelihoods. That same spirit of mobility, a willingness to uproot oneself, seems alive and well today based on the visualization of migration patterns above.

The visualization is a circle cut up into arcs, the light-colored pieces along the edge of the circle, each one representing a state. The arcs are connected to each other by links, and each link represents the flow of people between two states."


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Brealyn Holley's curator insight, November 3, 2015 9:18 PM

Many people migrate each and every day, but sometimes when they move to places like the USA, that part of the world can become overpopulated at times. Not having enough resources many begin to slowly die off which is either a good or bad thing while being in this position. However, when people do migrate they are leaving behind their homes and many are losing jobs. ~BH

Rylee English's curator insight, November 4, 2015 9:40 AM

in 2012, 2.2% of the U.S population migrated to different states. I think its  a good thing that people migrate to different states so they can expirience, first hand, how much states other than their home state contribute to our country. RE

Cade Johns's curator insight, November 5, 2015 7:51 PM

Much of the population in America migrates internally, approxamitely 7.1 million Americans in 2012.The only explanation is to go for a better life in another state.

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State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map?

State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers.  Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers."

 

Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, regions, gerrymandering, political, mapping, census, density.


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How Many Flyover States Does It Take to Equal One New York City?

How Many Flyover States Does It Take to Equal One New York City? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Don’t let my New York City–centric comparisons hinder your imagination. The interactive at the top of this page lets you visualize how different parts of the country compare in population density.

Click the button at the bottom of the interactive to select Los Angeles County, for instance, and then click anywhere on the map to generate a (roughly) circular region of (roughly) equal population. The population data come from the 2010 census, and the square mileage was calculated by summing each highlighted county’s total area. You can also use New Jersey (the most densely populated state), Wyoming (the least densely populated state outside of Alaska), Texas, the coasts (the group of all counties that come within 35 miles of either the Atlantic or Pacific oceans), and, yes, New York City as the baseline for your population comparison."

 

Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, urban, density.


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Andrew Stoops's curator insight, October 13, 2014 10:16 PM

This map is interesting in that flyover states is something that is not easily defined, at least by me. You could argue that no state is a flyover state because of the industry and businesses within the state itself. I am also curious to know why so few folks live in these areas as I have been to most of these places and they have the social and environmental pull factors important to migration.

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These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today

These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

" The Smithsonian Magazine recently dipped into David Rumsey's collection of over 150,000 maps to find some of the best representations of American cities over the past couple hundred years. With some simple programming, they were able to overlay images of vintage maps of some major cities onto satellite images from today. The results are fascinating."


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Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 9, 2015 2:15 PM

Fantastic collection!

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, January 6, 2016 5:02 PM

Entre art et géographie...

Lindsay Hoyt's curator insight, June 26, 11:31 PM

Helps connects the past to the present.

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Population Density

Population Density | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."


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Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:22 PM

While most articles talk about population growth, this article provides factual and visual evidence to show population density. -UNIT 2

michelle sutherland's curator insight, January 28, 2015 8:28 PM

love the map

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 2015 11:50 PM

This is an interactive map that shows which parts of the world are most densely populated. It becomes very apparent to the viewer that the world is not evenly distributed at all. Places like China and India have a far higher population density than places like Russia. 

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Visualizing 3 Billion Tweets

Visualizing 3 Billion Tweets | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is a look at 3 billion tweets - every geotagged tweet since September 2011, mapped, showing facets of Twitter's ecosystem and userbase in incredible new detail, revealing demographic, cultural, and social patterns down to city level detail, across the entire world.


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trampolinecalf's comment, September 27, 2013 2:50 AM
well
Amanda Morgan's comment, September 12, 2014 2:59 PM
It is fascinating to me how much social media not only connects the globe but allows us to observe trends and densely populated areas
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 11:06 AM

It is fascinating to me how much social media not only connects the globe but allows us to observe trends and densely populated areas

 

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Gapminder

Gapminder | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

" Unveiling the beauty of statistics for a fact based world view."


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Bronwyn Desjardins's curator insight, June 23, 2013 6:51 AM

This is a great website for stats on all sorts of global information.

ratzelster's curator insight, June 25, 2013 11:38 AM

Looking for an effective visualization tool?  Gapminder might just help you get your point across with a picture.

JMSS_Geography Resources's curator insight, June 26, 2013 1:20 AM

A “fact tank” that promotes a fact based world view. Gapminder promotes sustainable global development and achievement of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals.

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Mind-Bending 'Inception' Maps Show Manhattan Like You Haven't Seen It Before

Mind-Bending 'Inception' Maps Show Manhattan Like You Haven't Seen It Before | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"London-based design firm BERG created these two 3D maps of Manhattan, which look like a scene out of "Inception" (via Curbed NY)."


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Christopher Chris Benoit's comment, May 14, 2013 3:20 AM
Wow
Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, May 14, 2013 6:06 PM

des cartes..

gokhanht's comment, May 18, 2013 3:59 AM
great article
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NASA animation of temperature data from 1880-2011

Tags: video, environment,  visualization, climatechange, environment modify. 


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Beautiful Data Visualizations from the 19th Century

Beautiful Data Visualizations from the 19th Century | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Do you want some inspiration to create a visually stunning - yet fully optimized - data graphic? Well, let's go back about a 140 years... Handsome Atlas developed by Jonathan Soma of Brooklyn Brainery, provides a stunning new online interface to a large collection of beautiful data visualizations from the 19th century.

 

TR: Taking into account the age of these visualizations, one has to wonder if they intended them to be used by our generation in this way. I see potential for a "web 2.0" update of these charts to make them interactive . . .

 

Tags: infographic, historical, visualization, statistics.


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Manifest Destiny in 141 Maps

Manifest Destiny in 141 Maps | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This data visualization project is a great way to demonstrate the geographic expansion of the United States.  This is much more interactive than the typical time lapse video since you can scroll through the maps and explore each map through the interactive features. 

 

Tags: historical, USA, visualization, mapping.


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 5, 2012 11:24 AM
I really like the display of these changes in our country throughout the years. It's a great way of showing centuries of change into something easy to understand. This would help young students in a social studies class for sure.
Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 6, 2012 10:35 PM
i LOVE THIS! I can see this being such a valuable tool to use in a classroom. Students get the visual and written representation. Having the visual changes that took place in the United States is a better way to present to the students instead of them just reading a book. Will definitely save this article for future reference.
benjamin costello's curator insight, April 29, 2015 6:36 PM

This is great idea. I wonder if I can use something like this for my project.

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The Evolution of Western Dance Music

The Evolution of Western Dance Music | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"An Interactive Graphic Showing The Evolution of Western Dance Music Over The Last 100 Years in Under 20 seconds..."

 

Excellent visualization of diffusion as well as cultural syncretism in the pop cultures affiliated with globalization.  


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Seth Dixon's comment, November 4, 2011 4:36 PM
Thanks to one of my favorite people at my table at the APHG reading in Cincy for posting this link on FB.
Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 8, 2011 10:12 PM
This is a great visual to demonstrate the connection between cultures. We are such a diverse society and I think it is very important to be interconnected with other cultures and be aware of them. Looking at that visual it demonstrates with each year going by more and more pop culture gets connected with other countries.
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Animated U. S. Population Pyramid (1950-2010)

Animated U. S. Population Pyramid (1950-2010) | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is a simple, yet incredibly powerful graphic that helps to show the changing nature of population structure as a country moved to a different stage in the demographic transition (the link takes you to the animated version).  


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Raven Blair's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:19 AM

This population pyramid of the United States in 1976 show that there were many younger people there are under 25. The largest percent of the people, by age separation, are around the age of 10-15, which could be a result of the Baby Boom in 1964. Eventually, our population pyramid may become upside-down because as the larger population groups move up the pyramid based on their age, they start to have less children, which means a smaller base. 

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Map Projections

Map Projections | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

A map projection is used to portray all or part of the round Earth on a flat surface. This cannot be done without some distortion.  Every projection has its own set of advantages and disadvantages. There is no "best" projection.  The mapmaker must select the one best suited to the needs, reducing distortion of the most important features.  Mapmakers and mathematicians have devised almost limitless ways to project the image of the globe onto paper. Scientists at the U. S. Geological Survey have designed projections for their specific needs—such as the Space Oblique Mercator, which allows mapping from satellites with little or no distortion.  This document gives the key properties, characteristics, and preferred uses of many historically important projections and of those frequently used by mapmakers today.


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Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, March 27, 2015 2:05 AM

This is so useful for primary students

Christopher L. Story's curator insight, March 27, 2015 9:59 AM

Some review help

Leah Hood's curator insight, August 22, 5:02 PM

This article chronicles 18 map projections, how they are mathematically rendered with their own unique set of advantages and disadvantages. 


Questions to Ponder:  Why do map projections matter?  Is one global map projection inherently better than the rest?  What is your favorite?  


Tags: Mapping, visualization, map projections, cartography, perspective.

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State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map?

State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers.  Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers."

 

Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, regions, gerrymandering, political, mapping, census, density.


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Local Population Pyramids

Local Population Pyramids | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

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Mrs. Karnowski's curator insight, August 27, 2014 7:13 AM

1G Theme 2: 6 Billion people and me

CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 2014 8:27 PM

Useful for explaining population pyramids.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 16, 2014 12:08 PM

Unit 2

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Ethnic/Population Density Map

Ethnic/Population Density Map | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Drawing on data from the 2010 U.S. Census, the map shows one dot per person, color-coded by race. That's 308,745,538 dots in all."


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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:52 AM

This describes challenges to human migration because it shows certain areas that people have moved to opposed to areas that have less population because of climate, area, etc...

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:27 PM

This article shows the ethnic distribution across the US.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, September 25, 2014 12:30 PM

The Wired article's claim that this map depicts racial segregation instead of ethnic diversity can be seen in the patterns found in most of the major cities. While cities like Los Angeles and Las Vegas have many mixed areas containing different colored dots, other cities like Dallas and Atlanta show very clear cut lines between the ethnic makeup of areas. When zoomed out, the map certainly looks segregated with areas clearly marked blue, green, or yellow.

 

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This Guy's Never Met a Map He Didn't Want to Fix

This Guy's Never Met a Map He Didn't Want to Fix | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Just not always for the better: "I've deliberately designed maps that are deliberately horrible to look at, and succeeded."

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 30, 2013 10:46 PM

All maps are compromises; the Mercator projection preserves shape but distorts size, and so on.  What about sacrificing locational accuracy to preserve the aesthetic design or readability?  Just some things to think about as you peruse these redesigned subway maps.  


Tags: visualization, transportation, mapping, NYC.

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Map iPhone Users In a City, And You Know Where The Rich Live

Map iPhone Users In a City, And You Know Where The Rich Live | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Our stuff often says a lot about us, whether we own a hybrid car or a station wagon, a MacBook Pro or an ancient desktop.  Among other things, cell phone brands say something about socio-economics – it takes a lot of money to buy a new iPhone 5 (and even more money to keep up with the latest models that come out faster than plan upgrades do). Consider, then, this map of Washington, D.C., which uses geolocated tweets, and the cell phone metadata attached to them, to illustrate who in town is using iPhones (red dots) and who's using Androids (green dots)."


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Mary Everhart's comment, June 26, 2013 10:59 PM
I keep wondering what impact commuting has on the patterns shown on the maps.
Timothy Roth's curator insight, July 8, 2013 4:38 PM

This just amazes me! The information that geography relates to us will never cease to amaze me.

Fleur Farah's curator insight, May 27, 2014 7:06 AM

Would Sydney show these trends?

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Billions of Geotagged Tweets Visualized

Billions of Geotagged Tweets Visualized | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

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fabio sousa's comment, June 3, 2013 9:00 AM
que lindo
oyndrila's curator insight, June 3, 2013 1:35 PM

Useful and interesting visuals. They help us to understand significant aspects like varying population density, variable intensity of use of social media, digital divide etc.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, June 10, 2013 8:12 AM

Communication and social media. 

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The global debt clock

The global debt clock | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Authoritative weekly newspaper focusing on international politics and business news and opinion.

 

Tags: Economic, currency, visualization.


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Guillaume Decugis's comment, September 6, 2012 3:06 PM
Remember when we used to talk about the 3rd-world debt being a problem? (Back when the term 3rd world was actually not politically incorrect...) Well, this map clearly shows, debt is a 1st-world problem now...

Awesome map Seth! Thanks for sharing.
Investors Europe Stock Brokers's curator insight, September 2, 2014 1:42 AM

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How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF

How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Amazing work from wikipedia, summarizing the evolution of the US formation, originally here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territorial_evolution_of_the_United_States

 

Tags: USA, historical, visualization. 


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Paige T's comment, September 17, 2012 10:19 AM
This is very interesting because I had no idea that the United States had gone under such transformation. Even within certain borders, there is much change in respect to who the area belongs to. You definitely have to watch it a few times to get the full affect though.
Lindsey Robinson's comment, September 17, 2012 10:21 AM
Although the moving image makes it hard to actually pinpoint the U.S expansion at specific dates, I don't think that is the point of the map. The point of the map is to show how many times territories have changed, etc. I really like the map.. I have never seen anything like it.
Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 17, 2012 10:42 AM
The United States has changed drastically through the years with state borders, but I noticed that the regions' labels of the country are still similar today. For example, the southwest is much more divided today but still classified as a region with plenty of Spanish culture.
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80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks

80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

The green dots on this map representing Starbucks locations which are obviously clustered in major metropolitan centers.  Cross-referencing this Starbucks address location with population data, Davenport explains his mapping technique: "By counting the number of people who live within a given distance to each Starbucks, we can measure how well centered Frappuccinos are to the US citizenry. In other words: draw a 1-mile circle around every store, then add up the % of the population living within the circles. Repeat for 2, 3, 4....100 miles."   The result of this data is a fabulous logrithmic S-curve which explains much about the American population distribution.   

 

Tags: statistics, density, consumption, mapping, visualization, urban.


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Rich's comment, October 10, 2012 1:26 PM
That is insane how large that corperation is.
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Twitter Languages in London

Twitter Languages in London | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This map is a fantastic geovisualization that maps the spatial patterns of languages used on the social media platform Twitter.  This map was in part inspired by a Twitter map of Europe.  While most cities would be expected to be linguistically homogenous, but London's cosmopolitan nature and large pockets of immigrants influence the distribution greatly.

   

Tags: social media, language, neighborhood, visualization, cartography.


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Betty Denise's comment, November 7, 2012 1:13 PM
Thank you – again – for your tremendous partnership
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
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NPR Video: Visualizing How A Population Hits 7 Billion

The United Nations says today symbolically marks the moment when the world's population reaches 7 billion. A little more than two centuries ago, the global population was 1 billion. How did it grow so big so fast?

 

This is an excellent way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model. 


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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:56 PM

Unit 2

Isabella El-Hage's curator insight, March 18, 2015 12:45 PM
This article and video links to Unit Two through "population predictions for the future". This video gives a good representation of how the world's population grew so fast. It's hard to visualize the massive number of 7 billion, and how the number of people born and passed flow into that number, but the cup with the liquid filling in and out made it easier to comprehend. In the past two hundred years the world's population has grown from 1 to 7 billion! Due to advanced technology, and better health care, and agriculture and medicines, people are able to live longer. The UN predicts that the population with hit 10 billion by 2100, but then start to decrease or steady out. I think money needs to be invested in educating women in countries like India about contraceptives and birth control.