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Visited Countries Map

Visited Countries Map | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Create a Map of all the places you've been."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 17, 2015 2:21 PM

This is an incredibly limited mapping platform, but if all you want to do is put countries of the world into two simple categories, then this works (see also their states of the United States, provinces of Canada, and countries of Europe maps).  It is imminently shareable online, so this is a popular way of creating a map of 'countries/states I have visited' for a Facebook wall--and yes, those maps above represent where I have been. 


Tags mapping, 201, edtech, cartography.

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Visualizing 3 Billion Tweets

Visualizing 3 Billion Tweets | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is a look at 3 billion tweets - every geotagged tweet since September 2011, mapped, showing facets of Twitter's ecosystem and userbase in incredible new detail, revealing demographic, cultural, and social patterns down to city level detail, across the entire world.


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trampolinecalf's comment, September 27, 2013 2:50 AM
well
Amanda Morgan's comment, September 12, 2014 2:59 PM
It is fascinating to me how much social media not only connects the globe but allows us to observe trends and densely populated areas
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 11:06 AM

It is fascinating to me how much social media not only connects the globe but allows us to observe trends and densely populated areas

 

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Countries that are most and least welcoming to foreigners

Countries that are most and least welcoming to foreigners | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Blue countries are more welcoming, red countries less. Where does yours rank?

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Thomas D's comment, May 6, 2013 10:29 AM
I think this map of least and most welcoming countries to tourist is very interesting. I look at this through the American point of view and see that countries like Russia, Iran and Pakistan who are among the least welcoming states. These are all countries that we have had conflicts with throughout our countries history. I also find it interesting that the United States is such a neutral country towards tourism. A country that was based off of immigrants is no longer so welcoming to outsiders coming to our country. This could be due to the recent terrorist acts that have taken place within the United States in the past 15 years. Also just by looking at the map in a broader sense most of the countries that are unwelcoming are located in western Europe and Asia rather than anywhere else in the world.
Paul Beavers's comment, July 4, 2013 7:35 PM
Well the Chinese sure hide it well. I've visited there twice (once for a month) and I couldn't have been more welcomed. The people were the best part of both visits.
Bryan Chung's curator insight, May 8, 2014 7:42 PM

cool

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Iconic Skylines

Iconic Skylines | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

These skylines are not to scale, but are composite skylines to groups together the iconic representations of the particular cities into one.  Thanks to APHG teacher Ricard Giddens, here are some U.S. skylines. 


Tags: urban, Paris, London, place, tourism.


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Thomas Schmeling's comment, October 29, 2012 9:01 AM
How about one for Providence??
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Places to See Before They Disappear

Places to See Before They Disappear | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
From Andalusia to Olympia, here are ten gorgeous places we might not have for much longer.

 

Some ecosystems are incredibly resilient in the face of climate change, while others are more vulnerable.  This slideshow looks at some of the most gorgeous, yet susceptible places on Earth. 


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, October 17, 2011 11:13 PM
If these are some of the most incredible places on Earth why aren't we encouraging people or a way to help save these places. We have seen so many places get destroyed from natural disasters why aren't we trying to save these places. Also many of those places have a lot of tourism therefore it is essential we save them. Other places few but some I feel not many people would be familiar with. Why not inform people of what is going on. Finding way to help save these beautiful places.
Grammie's comment, October 21, 2011 12:20 AM
Ihave traveled to the most interesting and unusual places that we are aware of, what we need are leaders and people that are aware of these places that need saving, please help
Seth Dixon's comment, October 21, 2011 9:00 PM
I believe the "stewardship" metaphor for human environmental relations is an apt one, especially since misuse of the physical environment could most certainly place many decisions as making our societies as "bad stewards."
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China's Sustainable Cave Hotel Under Construction

China's Sustainable Cave Hotel Under Construction | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Construction has started on a cave hotel resort by Atkins that will nestle into the rockface of an abandoned water-filled quarry near Shanghai, China.

Once complete, the hotel will offer around 400 rooms, as well as conference facilities, a banquet hall, restaurants, a swimming pool and a water-sports centre.

The building will use geothermal technologies to generate its own electricity and lighting, while greenery will blanket a roof that extends just two storeys above the edge of the quarry.

 

Sustainability is integral to Atkins' design of this unique resort, built into an abandoned, water-filled quarry.


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John Blunnie's curator insight, July 12, 2013 11:20 AM

It seems even the Chinese tourist industry is at the forefront of hotel construction. This place looking breathtaking.

Carol Thomson's curator insight, July 17, 2013 4:51 AM

China is a major topic this year, could be good.

Resort and Hotel Mythbusters's comment, September 10, 2013 2:08 AM
This sustainable hotel is one another impressive work that architecture has been done. The basic idea itself is impressive considering its built in a cave over a waterfall and 3 storeys of them were beneath the water. However, the most important thing is this hotel generates their own energy which is incredible considering most new hotel nowadays have to promote their sustainability in the future. We can't wait to see the hotel to be finish and ready to use.
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The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism

The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Researchers are heading to Dharavi, Mumbai, to study the impact of slum tours on the residents.

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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 8:36 PM

I don’t find nothing right about tourist visiting the slum, I feel that the tourist are violating there privacy. They are human being not some historical landmark. If the tourist are not helping this people why are they going? If you are going to visit this places do it because you want to help them, not because you think is interesting their way of living.

Cam E's curator insight, April 1, 2014 11:57 AM

Moral questions are always fun. Personally I don't think going to see slums is all that exploitative in itself, but I would make a distinction between guided tours that cost money, and self-directed tours though. In a guided tour you are paying money to walk through a community and view what life is like for those people, but in a self-directed tour you are just another person walking down the streets and viewing whatever you stumble upon. There are plenty of tours within neighborhoods of different economic value the world over, but these tours are scrutinized because the people touring are as wealthy, or less wealthy, than the people living there. I don't think that a poor community changes this dynamic in an immoral way, as the perceptions of which group is superior come from the own minds of those who feel uncomfortable with it.

 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 2014 9:41 AM

This article rises in interesting question.  Are tours of slums exploitive or beneficial to the slum dwellers?  On the one hand the tours could feel like exploitation and the tourist is viewing attractions at a “zoo”, on the other hand it brings people far removed from slum life in contact with it and can change people’s point of view on the slums.  It can be beneficial if the tour guides donate money to the slums or jobs are sought by slum dwellers to become tour guides.  The question is should slums be hidden away from view or opened up to tourists so that they can see the hardships first hand.  I think that this is an issue that is not clearly black or white; there are many shades of gray involved in this issue.

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Social Media and Place

Social Media and Place | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Facebook most social cities: People everywhere use Facebook to check in to places. Here you can see the 5 top hotspots of the most "social"cities.

 

Questions to ponder: What attributes do these commonly 'checked into' landmarks have in common?  Are you surprised that some are or are not on the list?

 

Tags: socialmedia, place, tourism, infographic, London, NYC, Paris.


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82 iconic world landmarks to visit

82 iconic world landmarks to visit | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Some buildings and features are so well known they have become icons of place.

 

This is a great collection of important world landmarks including the pictured Potala Palace in the Tibetan city of Lhasa.  Who wouldn't like to see some of these places?   

 

Tags: geo-inspiration, tourism, images.


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Sophia Schroeder's comment, September 1, 2013 8:02 PM
All of these landmarks are beautiful. It's very interesting to see how much culture, especially religion, has shaped these "must see places." Also, I felt like I was traveling through time and got to examine the feats of new architectural eras, though some would debate that architectural works from the past are more outstanding strictly by the means in which they built these masterpieces. It needs to be said (to add to the wonderment of these places) that most of these monuments are built in places where the overall economic status is low; to see things like temples and churches of such great magnitude and beauty built with such craftsmanship, dedication, and money (even though it is scarce) shows how much they rely on their faith. I was also disappointed to see that the two monuments displayed for America, the Lincoln Memorial and the St. Louis Arch, were, in my opinion, not the best picks. Compared to the other landmarks ours feel so mundane, so void of history and culture (maybe, that's because I have grown up seeing them all my life and their meaning and awe has deteriorated to me.) I guess this can be attributed, in part, to the fact that our country is newer and has not yet grown enough to have the rich history including the trials and tribulations in which other countries have had which makes their culture more fascinating and intriguing to me.
Mary Rack's comment, September 2, 2013 12:49 AM
Sophia, Thanks for your very fine comment! I agree with you entirely, and especially about the Lincoln Memorial and St Louis Arch. Better choices might be the Grand Canyon, the Giant Sequoia trees in California, the National Cathedral in DC, or even Mt Rushmore? And some of the ancient cliff dwellings in the Southwest are amazing. Too bad they did not consult us.
Mary Rack's comment, September 2, 2013 12:51 AM
PS ... or the Hoover Dam?
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Europe moves to end passport-free travel in migrant row

Europe moves to end passport-free travel in migrant row | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
European interior ministers agree to 'radical revision' of Schengen amid fears of a flood of migrants from north Africa...

 

The Schengen Treaty is one of the most important aspects that facilitate the free flow of People goods and capital in Europe.  With increasing cultural anxiety connected to immigration during economic rough times, will this signal a reversal of Europe's trend towards increasing regional integration? 


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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 9:32 PM

European nations moved to reverse decades of unfettered travel across the continent when a majority of EU governments agreed the need to reinstate national passport controls amid fears of a flood of immigrants fleeing the upheaval in North Africa. In a serious blow to one of the cornerstones of a united, integrated Europe, EU interior ministers embarked on a radical revision of the passport-free travel regime known as the Schengen system to allow the 26 participating governments to restore border controls. They also agreed to combat immigration by pressing for "readmission accords" with countries in the Middle East and north Africa to send refugees back to where they came from. The policy shift was pushed by France and Italy, who have been feuding and panicking in recent weeks over a small influx of refugees from Tunisia. But 15 of the 22 EU states which had signed up to Schengen supported the move, with only four resisting, according to officials and diplomats present.