AP Human Geograph...
Follow
Find tag "statistics"
6.1K views | +4 today
AP Human Geography Education
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Restless America: state-to-state migration

Restless America: state-to-state migration | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Approximately 7.1 million Americans moved to another state in 2012. That’s over 2.2% of the U.S. population. The United States has a long history of people picking up and moving their families to other parts of the country, in search of better livelihoods. That same spirit of mobility, a willingness to uproot oneself, seems alive and well today based on the visualization of migration patterns above.

The visualization is a circle cut up into arcs, the light-colored pieces along the edge of the circle, each one representing a state. The arcs are connected to each other by links, and each link represents the flow of people between two states."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Anna B. Scott's curator insight, June 24, 3:07 PM

What might this mean for regional arts and performance? What else migrates when economics drive relocation? -ABS

Kat Sparkles's curator insight, August 4, 6:58 AM

This is a great way to visualize migration patterns within the United States.  What states are people migrating from and where are they going to?  Which states are more linked through these migratory bonds?  Here are the answers to these types of questions for every state of the union.  

 

Tags: migration, population, statistics, visualization, unit 2 population.

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 3:56 PM

This is a great way to visualize migration patterns within the United States.  What states are people migrating from and where are they going to?  Which states are more linked through these migratory bonds?  Here are the answers to these types of questions for every state of the union.  

 

Tags: migration, population, statistics, visualization, unit 2 population.

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Gender Gap Index

Gender Gap Index | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
xavia's comment, April 10, 2014 12:38 AM
gender gap chloropleth
Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 29, 8:30 AM

Summary- This map shows the equality of genders through their economic participation,  health, and access to education. In many poorer places you can see there is a much greater gender gap than in places like scandinavia where there isn't much of a gap at all. I

 

Insight- In Unit 3 one of the main subjects was gender. This chloropleth map shows the relationship between states and their equality among genders. It is easy to tell that in most undeveloped countries there is a much larger gender gap than more developed ones.

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, May 27, 10:37 AM

Gender Inequality Index-

This article explains the places and locations of gender inequality, and how most of this is densely kept in Africa, where most men are more powerful than women. It also shows how in more developed countries, their is gender equality, and with it better economy.

This article shows gender inequality index by the map and information displaying how gender inequality is located more in developing countries. And gender equality is placed in developed countries.

 

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration

American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"David Greene talks to writer Jeremy Miller about the American Centroid. That's the place where an imaginary, flat, weightless and rigid map of the U.S. would balance perfectly if all 300 million of us weighed the exact same."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:23 AM

The centre of population in the USA has moved further inland and southward compared to Australia. Comparing urbanisation in USA and Australia.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, November 11, 2013 10:33 PM

Informative, short podcast that details the changing migration of the US. This allows for the comparison of migration and time and the effects of migration over the years in the US. 

Emily Bian's curator insight, October 17, 2014 7:32 PM

The center of the U.S. population moves about every 10 years. 

In our APHUG textbook, it also talked about the center moving west. It also talks about the patterns and shifts of migration in the U.S going more west and south now, than before. I wonder if the trend will continue?  

It relates because we talked about this map in APHUG class, and it was in the textbook. The population trend is moving Southwest.

This is interesting for next year's APHUG students, because they get to see a population trend right in the US! It's a good article to think about why population trends are the way it is.

2) migration

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Gapminder

Gapminder | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

" Unveiling the beauty of statistics for a fact based world view."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Bronwyn Desjardins's curator insight, June 23, 2013 6:51 AM

This is a great website for stats on all sorts of global information.

ratzelster's curator insight, June 25, 2013 11:38 AM

Looking for an effective visualization tool?  Gapminder might just help you get your point across with a picture.

JMSS_Geography Resources's curator insight, June 26, 2013 1:20 AM

A “fact tank” that promotes a fact based world view. Gapminder promotes sustainable global development and achievement of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals.

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

WomanStats Maps

WomanStats Maps | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The WomanStats Project is the most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of women in the world. The Project facilitates understanding the linkage between the situation of women and the security of nation-states. We comb the extant literature and conduct expert interviews to find qualitative and quantitative information on over 310 indicators of women's status in 174 countries. Our Database expands daily, and access to it is free of charge.  Click here if you are a new to the project."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 30, 2013 7:48 PM
I have linked to the WomanStats Project in the past because their global datasets and maps are perfect for get students to explore a potential topic that might be of interest to them.  I'm resharing this now because they have recently updated their maps page to include 28 statistical measures to indicate the status of women around the world (including this one on the gendered discrepancy of access to secondary education).  The WomanStats Project provides important data and maps regarding issues of gender, access and equity with a spatial perspective.

Mary Rack's curator insight, March 31, 2013 7:44 AM

Amazing and thought-provoking. 

Daniel Landi's curator insight, April 1, 2013 2:08 AM

Topic link: Population and Change: Gender

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Countries that are most and least welcoming to foreigners

Countries that are most and least welcoming to foreigners | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Blue countries are more welcoming, red countries less. Where does yours rank?

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Thomas D's comment, May 6, 2013 10:29 AM
I think this map of least and most welcoming countries to tourist is very interesting. I look at this through the American point of view and see that countries like Russia, Iran and Pakistan who are among the least welcoming states. These are all countries that we have had conflicts with throughout our countries history. I also find it interesting that the United States is such a neutral country towards tourism. A country that was based off of immigrants is no longer so welcoming to outsiders coming to our country. This could be due to the recent terrorist acts that have taken place within the United States in the past 15 years. Also just by looking at the map in a broader sense most of the countries that are unwelcoming are located in western Europe and Asia rather than anywhere else in the world.
Paul Beavers's comment, July 4, 2013 7:35 PM
Well the Chinese sure hide it well. I've visited there twice (once for a month) and I couldn't have been more welcomed. The people were the best part of both visits.
Bryan Chung's curator insight, May 8, 2014 7:42 PM

cool

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Population clock for every country

Population clock for every country | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Real time statistics for current population of any country. Real time data on population, births, deaths, net migration and population growth.

 

This site shows various demographic statistics for every country including some based on projections in demographic trends in the given country.  If the current trends hold (which they won't, but that is still an interesting measure), the entire Japanese population will disappear in 1,000 years according to this Global Post article.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 2014 10:17 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the population growth theme because it utilizes all of the indicators we learned in this class, including CBR, CDR, net migration rates, and population growth rates.

Riley Tuggle's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:51 AM

I believe India has more men than women because sometimes when women can't have a son for their first or second child, the men would beat the women to death, or in some instances women are captured and sold for wives, and they may commit suicide they are so depressed. Also, some pregnant women find out their baby is a girl, they would aport or abandon her because sons are apparently more important and successful because they would stay home and take care of their parents when they are elderly and they would carry on the families name. -rt

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:22 AM

This is fantastic - have a look at various countries and their 'rate' of growth

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

100 People: A World Portrait

100 People: A World Portrait | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is the truly global project that asks the children of the world to introduce us to the people of the world.  We've seen videos and resources that ask the question, "if there were only 100 people in the world, what would it look like?"  This takes that idea of making demographic statistics more meaningful one step further by asking student in schools for around the world to nominate some "representative people" and share their stories.  The site houses videos, galleries from each continent and analyze themes that all societies must deal with.  This site that looks at the people and places on out planet to promote greater appreciation of cultural diversity and understanding is a great find. 

 

Tags: Worldwide, statistics, K12, education, comparison.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Canberra Girls Grammar GSSF's curator insight, September 1, 2013 10:43 PM

Year 7 Liveability Unit 2

savvy's curator insight, September 3, 2014 12:57 PM

This just makes me realize how the world would be if we only had 100 people rather than the billions we have now.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, February 26, 7:24 AM

A face das crianças no mundo

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks

80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

The green dots on this map representing Starbucks locations which are obviously clustered in major metropolitan centers.  Cross-referencing this Starbucks address location with population data, Davenport explains his mapping technique: "By counting the number of people who live within a given distance to each Starbucks, we can measure how well centered Frappuccinos are to the US citizenry. In other words: draw a 1-mile circle around every store, then add up the % of the population living within the circles. Repeat for 2, 3, 4....100 miles."   The result of this data is a fabulous logrithmic S-curve which explains much about the American population distribution.   

 

Tags: statistics, density, consumption, mapping, visualization, urban.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rich's comment, October 10, 2012 1:26 PM
That is insane how large that corperation is.
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Hidden Cost of Counting the Homeless

The Hidden Cost of Counting the Homeless | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

A professor criticizes the "culture of quantification," (in the journal cultural geographies) arguing that we don't do enough with the data we collect.  If all we do is count (or attempt to count the homeless), does that help them in any way or change the realities that lead to homelessness?  Are we counting them just to give us the numbers to receive credit that may help other programs but not help the homeless?  Is data for data's sake of any value?


UPDATE: Another geographer noted some other issues of homelessness on the website facebook page, specifically in regard to this map of homelessness: "A problem associated with this map is that while the numbers get smaller, it raises the question: where did they go? (answer: Hollywood, after an emphasis on policing pushed them out)...this could be tied in to a discussion about map scale."

 

Tags: statistics, class, census, socioeconomic, housing, poverty.


Via Allison Anthony, Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Interactive World Statistics

Interactive World Statistics | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

The Brazilian government's geographic department (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística-roughly equivalent to the U.S. Census Bureau) has compiled an fantastic interactive world factbook (available in English and Spanish as well as Portuguese).  The ease of navigation allows the user to conduct a specific search of simply explore demographic, economic, environmental and development data on any country in the world.    

 

Tags: population, worldwide, statistics, mapping, zbestofzbest.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Leonardo Martins's comment, October 20, 2012 11:08 AM
So cool…thank you very much!
Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 24, 2012 10:23 AM
The world, here, is literally at your fingertips. It is a simple way for anyone to locate a multitude of data about any given place around the world. It is another way that brings the whole world that much closer in this technological era.
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

2011 UN Human Development Report

2011 UN Human Development Report | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Human Development Report (HDR) was first launched in 1990 with the single goal of putting people back at the center of the development process in terms of economic debate, policy and advocacy.

 

With a host of links that connect you to videos, charts, statistics about both the present and projections into that future, this is a fantastic resource for any lesson on development. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's comment, December 3, 2011 8:39 AM
Thanks for recooping the link...I think this one will be incredibly valuable.
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

World Large Urban Areas 1905-2050

World Large Urban Areas 1905-2050 | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
In 1950, the world population was 2.5 billion and according to United Nations estimates, the world population reached seven billion sometime around October 31st this year.

Want some global population data sets to map for a GIS project?  Historical GIS? Here it is.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Top 10 Safest Countries In The World In 2014

Top 10 Safest Countries In The World In 2014 | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
This list attempts to pinpoint the 10 safest countries in the world by analyzing the Global Peace Index, or GPI, of each country, taking into consideration homicide rates, levels of violent crime, nuclear capabilities and more.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jacques Lebègue's curator insight, May 2, 2014 3:19 AM

L'indice de paix global agrège des facteurs comme le taux d'homicide, celui de crimes violents et autres. On a un bon modèle pas lui, tout près: la Belgique, n°10 de ce classement. En règle générale, à l'exception notable de la Nouvelle-Zélande, il vaut vivre au nord de l'hémisphère nord...

16s3d's curator insight, May 2, 2014 3:50 AM

L'indice de paix global agrège des facteurs comme le taux d'homicide, celui de crimes violents et autres. On a un bon modèle pas lui, tout près: la Belgique, n°10 de ce classement. En règle générale, à l'exception notable de la Nouvelle-Zélande, il vaut vivre au nord de l'hémisphère nord...

Emma Lupo's curator insight, October 20, 2014 9:45 PM

For looking at crime

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Understanding Global Statistics

Understanding Global Statistics | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Infographics to explain global statistics."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, August 27, 2013 3:49 PM

Un conjunto de sencillas infografias para visualizar estadisticas de la humanidad en el tiempo presente

trampolinecalf's comment, September 27, 2013 2:46 AM
good one
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:11 PM

If the World was 100 People shows the statistics of the world as in smaller proportions allowing them to be easily visualized.

Some of the graphics divide the people into regions and nationalities mainly as Formal by continents .

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Finding the True Border Between Yankee and Red Sox Nation Using Facebook Data

Finding the True Border Between Yankee and Red Sox Nation Using Facebook Data | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"By using Facebook data from the 2.5 million people in New York or New England that ‘like’ either the Red Sox or Yankees I was able to create a more accurate rivalry map than ever before."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
John Blunnie's curator insight, July 28, 2013 1:12 PM

A fun map i can relate to a lot being a New Yorker living in RI. I also believe theres more Yankee fans in Red Sox territory then Red Sox fans in Yankee territory.

trampolinecalf's comment, September 27, 2013 2:55 AM
nice
Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:26 AM

Pretty neat use of mapping and facebook to create this. This map is around the idea of what i expected it to look like with a few exceptions. As a yankee fan i expected a little bit more out of fellow Rhode Islanders when it came to the distribution but i guess i was wrong. i would also like to point out that cultural diversity probably has a role to play in this, with western connecticut being more ethnically diverse than eastern.

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

International Migration

Almost everywhere on the world, international migration is a hot topic. Most of the time the debate about migration is fierce and charged with prejudices and...

Via Natalie K Jensen, Nancy Watson, Seth Dixon
more...
Sierra_Mcswagger's curator insight, September 10, 2014 10:02 AM

This video is primarily talking on the widely known topic of migration. 3 percent of the worlds population is living away from there place of birth. The push of migration from places include poverty, war, and environmental disasters. The migration pull in some places are because of  economic opportunity, and political freedom. Migration is increasing, and is thought of as a bad thing.(s.s.)

Aurora Rider's curator insight, October 7, 2014 8:59 PM

This video is great for going over the many different aspects that go along with migration. It talks about what migration is and the reasons why people migrate known as push and pull factors. It talks about the different types of migration such as asylum seakers and illegal immigration. It mentions the disadvantages and advantages of migration.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:27 PM

A great YouTube video- discussing the controversy of international migration among other things that fall into place of the disapproval of international migration. -UNIT 2 

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Technology and Tradition Collide: From Gender Bias to Sex Selection

Technology and Tradition Collide:  From Gender Bias to Sex Selection | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Every year, as a result of prenatal sex selection, 1.5 million girls around the world are missing at birth.  How do we know these girls are missing if they were never born? Under normal circumstances, about 102 to 107 male babies are born for every 100 female babies born. This is called the sex ratio at birth, or SRB."

 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 25, 2013 3:23 PM

How do local cultures create these demographic statistics?  How do these demographic statistics impact local cultures? 


Tags: gender, technologyfolk culture, statistics, China, population.

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Generate Simple World Maps

Generate Simple World Maps | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Free travel tip and photos from all over the world...

 

This map is not a professionally produced map and that is the beauty of this website. Virtually anyone can make a 1-feature world map by simply clicking on a checklist all of the countries you want highlighted on your map. Second, open the file and add some text and a few lines to label it. This took less than 20 minutes to make with no need for any cartographic or GIS experience (this PNG didn't compress well, the full image of this map can be seen here).


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 30, 2012 10:04 PM

This map is not a professionally produced map and that is the beauty of this website.  Virtually anyone can make a 1-feature world map by simply clicking on a checklist all the countries you want highlighted on your map.  Second, opened the file and added some text and a few lines to label it.  This took 20 minutes to make with no need for any cartographic or GIS experience  (this PNG didn't compress well, the full image of this map can be seen here).

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Mapping Language: Limited English Proficiency in America

Mapping Language: Limited English Proficiency in America | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Although English is America’s common tongue, immigrants’ efforts to learn it present challenges to institutions and individuals alike. These graphics compare regions, schools, and communities where newcomers have settled to learn and integrate.

 

The interactive map feature of language and the accompanying spatial patterns reveal much about the major migrational patterns in the United States.

 

Tags: Migration, USA, statistics, language, immigration, unit 2 population.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Beautiful Data Visualizations from the 19th Century

Beautiful Data Visualizations from the 19th Century | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Do you want some inspiration to create a visually stunning - yet fully optimized - data graphic? Well, let's go back about a 140 years... Handsome Atlas developed by Jonathan Soma of Brooklyn Brainery, provides a stunning new online interface to a large collection of beautiful data visualizations from the 19th century.

 

TR: Taking into account the age of these visualizations, one has to wonder if they intended them to be used by our generation in this way. I see potential for a "web 2.0" update of these charts to make them interactive . . .

 

Tags: infographic, historical, visualization, statistics.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Economic and Political Impact of Immigrants, Latinos and Asians State by State

The Economic and Political Impact of Immigrants, Latinos and Asians State by State | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Not every state is equally impacted by migration, and the demographic profile of migrants is different for every state. This is an online mapping tool to search a large database that can give the user state specific information about the impact of economics and politics based on migration from Latin America and Asia on any given state.

 

Tags: Immigration, unit 2 population, migration, economic, statistics, mapping, political.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 26, 2014 12:43 PM

Unit 2 population and migration 

This map shows the population of migrants in certain states and compares them to other states. This demographic specifically highlights Texas and shows its migrant information. Texas has the highest immigrant income out of all of the states. Also Texas has very few naturalized citizens who used to be an immigrant.

This map relates to unit 2 because it shows the illegal immigration. And immigration theories. This proves ravensteins laws correct because it shows how people move a short distance to migrate, knowing that most migrants to America come from Latin America. This map is a great example of ravensteins theories and unit 2

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Countries with the Most Migrants

Countries with the Most Migrants | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

List of the countries with the most migrants in the world as measured by net migration rate.


Which countries have the most migrants per capita living there?  What spatial or development patterns do you see on this list?  


Tags: Migration, population, Immigration, statistics, worldwide, unit 2 population. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 22, 2014 12:04 PM

This is an interesting little chart because it reveals to us which countries have the highest percentage of migrants that make up their general population. Definitely suprised me to see Qatar as the number one on the list, I would have expected the US to be at the top, but it is not even in the top 10!

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:26 PM

This shows the net migration of immigrants. 

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, September 30, 2014 4:04 PM

Remember this is based on a % of the total population, and not total #. Which countries have the most migrants per capita living there?  What spatial or development patterns do you see on this list? 

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

UN High Commissioner for Refugees

UN High Commissioner for Refugees | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The key facts and figures about refugees, IDPs, asylum seekers and stateless people from UNHCR's annual Global Trends report.

 

Not all migation is voluntary.  Refugees and other non-voluntary migrants often are in their situation due to complex geographic factors beyond their control at the national scale. 

 

Tags: migration, population, development, conflict, statistics, war, unit 2 population.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mr Ortloff's curator insight, January 22, 2013 12:20 AM

Good source for stats on non-voluntary migrants.

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Religious Geography of the United States

Religious Geography of the United States | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

A set of 2000 census maps that focus on religion in the United States.  Even in secular societies, religion can play an important role within society, both culturally and politically.  Include are links to many more religious maps.  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rebecca!Morgan Geography's curator insight, November 21, 2013 1:30 PM
Geography- these maps show the diverse religions and the distribution of them.
Andrew and Tom's curator insight, November 25, 2013 3:11 PM

This map shows the consentration of religion in the US and how ut mainly is in the south.