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A Photo Essay on School Sprawl

A Photo Essay on School Sprawl | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Schools used to be the heart of a neighborhood or community. Children and not a few teachers could walk to class, or to the playground or ball field on the weekend. This was relatively easy to do, because the schools were placed within, not separated from, their neighborhoods. They were human-scaled and their architecture was not just utilitarian, but signaled their importance in the community. Now it has become hard to tell one from a Walmart or Target."

 

What better way to demonstrate the concepts of urban sprawl, automobile-dependent city planning and economies of scale than by analyzing the very geographic context of our schools themselves?  This is a very nicely arranged photo essay that most could spark conversation and would foster some discussion on how best to plan neighborhoods and spatially arrange the city.   

 

Tags: transportation, planning, sprawl, education, scale. 


Via Seth Dixon
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The Beginning of the End for Suburban America

The Beginning of the End for Suburban America | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Beginning of the End for Suburban America...

 

A provocative title, but are our cities and urban settlement patterns shifting?  Is sprawl going to be curtailed by cultural, environmental and economic forces?


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Aimee Knight's curator insight, February 10, 7:01 AM

Over the years, Americans have been attracted to the "big city life" and all that goes with it. They chase down this dream that they know nothing about. This seemingly overrated lifestyle has suited some, but many, as we are seeing now, have discovered that the fast-paced life is not for them. In large numbers, people are beginning to desire the simplicity of life away from the constant streams of people and traffic. This change in trend contradicts the trends of previous years. We have worked so hard to build the large cities we have now, but was it all for nothing?

ethanrobert's curator insight, February 10, 7:04 AM

 Urban sprawl is starting to slow along with things like how much people drive their automobiles. This shift is due an increase in gas prices leading to a more selective choice to use public transit over the rising gas prices. This is mainly an economic problem, but other cultural and environmental issues will develop over time. This may lead to the end of the urban sprawl. - Robert

The Kingdom Keepers's curator insight, February 10, 7:10 AM

When suburban areas starting increasing, it had several advantages- Bigger homes, better education, a yard to call your own. These advantages are beginning to be shadowed by several factors that are actually pushing people out of these suburban areas and changing the urban pattern in our cities. Will people start to swarm in the central business district, or will rural areas reign? -Brooke

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Detroit: The 'Shrinking City' That Isn't Actually Shrinking

Detroit: The 'Shrinking City' That Isn't Actually Shrinking | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
We're often told that Detroit has been abandoned—but the metro area is stable, and addressing sprawl is still a challenge...

 

Population size and physical size...not always as correlated as one might assume in this age of urban sprawl.  This details some of the difficulties in revitalizing abandoned sections of a city when the economic motive to expand outward is so easy. 


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"The Other Coast" Comic Strip

"The Other Coast" Comic Strip | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is an amusing, but still insightful way to discuss habitat encroachment, development, conservation and the economic utility of expansion. 


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