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In historic shift, Saudis to allow some girls' sports

In historic shift, Saudis to allow some girls' sports | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Private girls' schools are now allowed to hold sports activities in accordance with the rules of Shariah, or Islamic law. Students must adhere to 'decent dress' codes and Saudi women teachers will be given priority in supervising the activities, according to the Education Ministry's requirements.  The decision makes sports once again a stage for the push to improve women's rights, nearly a year after two Saudi female athletes made an unprecedented appearance at the Olympics."  This news comes at a time when Saudi Arabia has allowed women to ride bikes (sort of).

 

Tags: Saudi Arabia, culture, gender, religion, Middle East.


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 2, 6:53 PM

The article displays the constant battle the women of Saudi Arabia face on a daily basis. However, this is a small sign of women in this area slowly getting more rights. This is an important right granted to women. Being allowed to participate in sporting activities or other types of physical exercise is very important in order to maintain a healthy lifestyle. 

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 11:49 AM

This is a push in the struggle for women's rights in Saudi Arabian. For the first time girls will be allowed to play sports in private schools. The ultraconservative kingdom still requires that the girls were descent and  decent dress and and Saudi women teachers are going to have priority in supervising the activities.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 12:23 PM

Female rights in countries like Saudi Arabia are nothing like in the U.S. Much like in other Middle Eastern countries, Saudi Arabia allows little to no extra curricular activities for girls and women. Allowing them to play some specific sports is a huge deal!

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The Body in Public Space

The Body in Public Space | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Here are some seemingly eclectic topics.  All of them center around the appropriateness of the body being displayed publicly and the cultural norms that shape how we think about the issue.  I've included a sensational restroom, public nursing, top-free protests, and of course, the Kate Middleton scandal.

 

Tags: culture, popular culture, gender, place, space.


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Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 26, 2012 7:11 AM
Hilarious! The breasts of women are human parts of a woman which should be respected because it is where a human being feeds. It is a symbol of life.
Don Brown Jr's comment, September 30, 2012 5:07 PM
This cartoon clearly shows how breast are sexually marketed in our society and how we will can accept the fashionably sexual display of breast in public yet consider breast feeding offensive. In many ways this cartoon seems to show how some social norms seem to interfere with common sense as we should be more critical of the sexual advertisement of breast while breast feeding on the other hand should at the very least be tolerated.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:37 PM

I think the men who prohibit public breast-feeding of babies should be starved.  I have a baby cousin, whom I love dearly, and I would hate to delay his lunch as much as anyone else would hate to have their own lunches delayed.  To prohibit public-breastfeeding is cruel, discriminatory, and hypocritical, as these prohibitors were likely publicly breastfed at some point in their infant days.  A message overall about other people acting 'scandelously'- get over it.  Grow up.  I don't like having to hear from or about you, and it takes away from my definition of a perfect world when I see people starving my baby cousin.  Culture should accomodate to the entirety of the population, not a majority.  After all, as for babies- we've all been there, and as for old people- we'd be lucky to live that long, but we'll llikely be there too.  I don't think we should be governed by someone that some people elect and other people don't vote for, because it's really not fair... it would be better and a compromise to not be governed at all!  So don't be critical, be understanding... Peace and Love!

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Public Spaces Worth Caring About...

http://www.ted.com In James Howard Kunstler's view, public spaces should be inspired centers of civic life and the physical manifestation of the common good....

 

Kunstler impassionedly argues that American architecture and urban planning are not creating public places that encourage interaction and communal engagement.  We should create more distinct places that foster a sense of place that is 'worth fighting for,' as opposed to suburbia which he sees as emblematic of these problems.  How should we design cities to create a strong sense of place?  What elements are necessary?  Warning: He uses some strong language.   


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Mary Burke's comment, April 15, 2013 9:24 AM
I appreciate what this guy is saying. I wish we could build places worth caring about. We need more people like Mr Kunstler. But I don't things are as bleak as he depicts. He picked some of the ugliest places there are. We do need a sense of place. Right now we get that in our homes. I think what Mr Kunstler is talking about is a community based sense of place that could be created just with the kind of buildings we make in the space. Maybe we could create a friendly atmosphere with well designed buildings. We need to start somewhere to make people not so afraid of each other.
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 11, 2013 9:44 PM

Everyone in the world should care about places if it is small or not known but a place has it own character that some people enjoy while other do not want to know about. Every place has it significance that many people have not noticed because they are blinded to it. People should really have an open mind when it comes down to experiencing new places and learn about its history or anything that you did not know about it.

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NPR: Saudi Women Drive Change Despite Mixed Signals

Authorities continue to go after women who flout Saudi Arabia's ban on female drivers, but King Abdullah has pledged to give women more political power in the coming years.

 

This article focuses on public space and differentiated cultural norms that created deeply gendered spaces that are onerous to navigate. Gender, Place and Culture are all intertwined.   


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Gender Divisions in Iran

Gender Divisions in Iran | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

For my non-Farsi speaking readers, this map displays a 'male' province and a 'female' province.  These two provinces are separated by barbed wire, 20-meter trench and the Great Wall of China with ground-to-air missiles.  

 

While not a "cartographically accurate" map of the divisions within Iran, it does symbolically highlight the enormous gulf between men and women.  Men and women are not in separate provinces, but what might the symbolic spatial gender division on this map represent for Iranian society? 


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Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, October 31, 2013 7:20 AM

Although this is not an accurate map of real divisions within Iran, the map does pose as a symbolic representation of the gap between men and women in the country.  Even though men and women are not forced to live in separate provinces within Iran, it sure does seem like they do based on the vast difference in rights between the two genders.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 4, 4:41 PM

Most countries throughout history had some type of gender division. It appears countries such as Iran and Saudi Arabia are still treating women as second-class citizens and are not giving them any opportunities to be successful. It may take another 100 years before they are treated like men. Some countries take longer to modernize, and Iran appears to be an example of that.  

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 11:01 AM

I think this picture shows how Iranian society thinks and operates. There is an entirely different set of rules, ideals, and codes men and women follow in their society. Women are typically held inside, wear head coverings, are not allowed to be in the public sector unless accompanied by a man or her husband. This map isn't real, but it does show that if they were in separate provinces, there would be a gender division that could spring a revolution for women to be educated and empowered, and it could also hurt the economy because ultimately a society needs women to have children to ensure there is a workforce.

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Insecure Space and Precarious Geographies

Insecure Space and Precarious Geographies | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is an intriguing look into security, terrorism, politics and the city.  The most interesting places are often the most unconventional and places like Jerusalem with it's geopolitical importance, makes for a very compelling urban landscape. 


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The Scale of the Universe

The Scale of the Universe | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Zoom from the edge of the universe to the quantum foam of spacetime and learn about everything in between.

 

Click "Start," and then use the slider across the bottom, or the wheel on your mouse, to zoom in -- and in and in and in... or out and out and out... It will take you from the very smallest features postulated by scientists (the strings in string theory) to the very largest (the observable universe). This really is a fabulous visual demonstration of scale at micro and macro levels. This is an excellent way to bring spatial thinking into the math curriculum as well.

 

Tags: Scale, perspective, space, spatial, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples.


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Mark V's comment, September 10, 2012 11:38 AM
I felt that this is an excellent way to understand spatial thinking which is important in many areas beyond geography.
Joe Andrade's curator insight, July 7, 2013 7:08 PM

This is a great method of teaching some of the principals behind understanding spatial analysis. An important skill in understanding the world we live in.

Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 9, 2013 4:50 AM

Click "Start," and then use the slider across the bottom, or the wheel on your mouse, to zoom in -- and in and in and in... or out and out and out... It will take you from the very smallest features postulated by scientists (the strings in string theory) to the very largest (the observable universe). This really is a fabulous visual demonstration of scale at micro and macro levels. This is an excellent way to bring spatial thinking into the math curriculum as well.


Tags: Scale, perspective, space, spatial, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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Amazing view of Universe captured

Amazing view of Universe captured | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Hubble Space Telescope has produced one of its most extraordinary views of the Universe to date.

 

The Earth is an amazing place to study...but this makes it feel remarkably small. 

 

Tags: geospatial, space, remote sensing, scale, perspective. 


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Matt Mallinson's comment, October 1, 2012 8:32 AM
I like this kind of stuff, if i didn't choose geography I would probably have chosen astronomy. Everything about it interests me, there's so much that we don't know and will probably never know.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, September 10, 2013 8:07 AM

I thought it was funny that even though many of the published telescopically captured photos are composites of different lens and filtered shots of a single item, or area of space, that if that item or area were really to be examined, to get more of a feel for the universe as it truly is rather than how we would ordinarily see it, would be to consider it from an infinite number of perspectives.  Rather than just one perspective, as humans are limited to, the universe has many eyes.  Instead of taking many photographs from the same perspective, we could, as many modern scientists do, do in-depth scans using X-ray technology, and magnetic resonance, assessing composition, to create a full picture of all angles, zooms, and subjects of everything, in order to determine more about origins and mysteries of the universe. I would endorse that to be done on an infinite scale, complete with documentation of all spatial anomallies and occurances, such that completion of understanding could, in theory take place by crossing the gap of the notion of infinity by utilizing technology to one's advantage.  This would allow us not to waste time looking at every detail, but to have something with more processing capabilities understand it for us, and communicate that infinity in a way that we could see it.  There are dangers of using X-ray technology, and it doesn't seem like NASA really cares about (as one could hope) not harming alien life, or planting life on other worlds, etc. I would more forcibly endorse that we do not try to observe other worlds and the Universe at all, because god forbid, some alien colony finds us and sees that we are not only cuturally divided, we are a torn world, shattered in the aftermath of the destruction that comes from our selfishness and pride that has long dominated the hearts of men.  They might be disappointed, and they should be.

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'Geographical Oddity'

Partly just because I love this highly quotable movie with an incredible soundtrack, but this short clip can start be a good conversation starter.  I'm hoping to use it when discussing relative location (or isolation) as well as the space-time compression.  I ask my student how far away they live from campus and invariably they answer with a unit of time (even though distance was implied in the question).  Why answer with time when discussing distance?  What technologies are dependent on our temporal analysis of distance? How would our perception of distance change based on our access to transportation and communication technologies?       


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Richie Sowa's Man Made Island

Bringing a whole new meaning to the terms "your own private island" and the "creation of place."  An intriguing hook for discussing human and environmental interactions and what resources are needed to sustain life.   


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Seth Dixon's comment, November 4, 2011 7:52 AM
Thanks to "LF ric" for this link...super cool and something I would have never dreamed of (but wish I did).
Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 8, 2011 7:03 PM
Love this video! I think this is amazing!
Michael Aria Mosaffa's comment, February 20, 2013 7:36 PM
this is quite amazing and remarkable! But how does he use the restroom, does he like squat ovoer the edge or something? Or how does he get purified water? How does he get meat? Does he know how to make a fire without a match? How does he get enough food for him, 2 cats, a dog, 2 chickens, and a duck? Besides those questions I think he is a brilliant mad-man!
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Ground Zero "mosque" opens without protests

Ground Zero "mosque" opens without protests | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The proposed construction of an Islamic center near Ground Zero in New York caused outrage when it was announced two years ago. Now days after the 10-year anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the facility opened last night to no opposition.

 

This is an intriguing swing based on the initial reaction a few years ago about this Islamic cultural center.  Why the fervor 2 years ago?  Why the silence now?  These are worthwhile questions to explore with our students. 


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Emma Lafleur's curator insight, February 3, 2013 8:02 PM

I wrote an essay two years ago, before Park51 opened, about the controversy surrounding it. Later, when I heard that it had finally opened, I was relieved. There were so many problems that the Islamic center faced because there was a lot of tension due to the center's proximity to Ground Zero. The Muslims need a place like this, especially close to Ground Zero to portray how it was terrorist groups that committed the terrible crimes and attacked the country and not the Islamic religion. In recent history, the US has had many problems with many Middle Eastern countries based on differences in beliefs, and the acceptance and tolerance of this cultural center portray how people can overcome these differences and not profile people based on religion, race, and ethnicity.

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 12, 2013 6:47 PM

In my opinion trying to stop the building of this was awful. American prides itself on being the land of the free and that includes freedom of religion regardless of what the horror that took place on 9/11. What was done on 9/11 can not be blamed on a whole population, race, or religion when it was the doing of one group. The rest of these innocent people who were are part of the United States of America were just as affected as the rest of us and it is good to see that this building was allowed to happen in peace.