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Ethnic/Population Density Map

Ethnic/Population Density Map | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Drawing on data from the 2010 U.S. Census, the map shows one dot per person, color-coded by race. That's 308,745,538 dots in all."


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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:52 AM

This describes challenges to human migration because it shows certain areas that people have moved to opposed to areas that have less population because of climate, area, etc...

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:27 PM

This article shows the ethnic distribution across the US.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, September 25, 2014 12:30 PM

The Wired article's claim that this map depicts racial segregation instead of ethnic diversity can be seen in the patterns found in most of the major cities. While cities like Los Angeles and Las Vegas have many mixed areas containing different colored dots, other cities like Dallas and Atlanta show very clear cut lines between the ethnic makeup of areas. When zoomed out, the map certainly looks segregated with areas clearly marked blue, green, or yellow.

 

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Teaching Race and Poverty in the wake of "If I Was A Poor Black Kid"

Teaching Race and Poverty in the wake of "If I Was A Poor Black Kid" | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Let me explain: this particular article has created a firestorm of controversy online.  All of the debated points center on how we think about race and  poverty in the USA.  I'm most certainly not endorsing this article as a 'stand-alone' source of information, but rather a jumping off point to discuss some difficult questions that, fundamentally are geographic in nature.   This is a difficult subject, so sometimes we feel more comfortable just ignoring the topic...I feel that is a disservice to our students.   

 

Personally, what I want my students to understand and get out of this is two-fold: the advice that Gene Marks makes to individuals to pursue educational opportunities to improve their situation is excellent and sound.  The problem lies in that this individual advice is being proposed as a societal remedy for larger, structural problems.  In essence it is a problem of scale.  What is good advice for the individual with not cure all the ails of systemic problems that go far beyond needs education.  What do you want your students to get out of this debate/discussion?     

Some sample rebuttal articles:

http://www.dominionofnewyork.com/2011/12/13/if-i-were-the-middle-class-white-guy-gene-marks/#.TuodE3qwXh_

 

 

http://www.good.is/post/an-ode-to-a-poor-black-kid-i-never-knew-how-forbes-gets-it-wrong/

And a snippet of a more scholarly piece "Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria:"

http://www.rci.rutgers.edu/~jdowd/tatum-blackkids.pdf


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Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 12:36 AM

Gene Marks probably should have chosen a different topic to write about, or at least one that could be deemed less offensive.  He does have sound advice for those "poor black kids," but only those living in a perfect world can follow his advice fully.  It's easy to say you are going to be the most perfect student you can be, but if you live in an environment where parental supervision is low, a goal such as that is harder to achieve.  Parents in these areas do not stress it enough that being a top notch student is a necessity.  This is not a one dimensional issue. 

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Racial Profiling on an “Industrial Scale”

Racial Profiling on an “Industrial Scale” | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

FBI Using Census Data to Map and Police Communities by Race: "The ACLU uncovers an FBI program that pairs Census data with 'crude stereotypes' to map ethnic communities."

This is not an impartial article, but the issue of cultural bias and profiling in "objective analysis" raises some serious questions.  What is appropriate to map?  By whom?  For what purposes? 


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GIS student's comment, November 3, 2011 4:24 PM
This article reminds me of what we discussed in the beginning of the semester when we discussed some of the potential problems with GIS. Some of those problems included using maps to and google earth to examine what people are doing with certain certain land that they own. The article discusses how information can be represented in an unconstitutional way. The question is then raised, is it appropriate to map such information and who should be able to see this map? I personally don't believe that the GIS portion should be targeted. When the FBI gathers this information its much different from when they represent the same data with a map.
cookiesrgreat's comment, November 3, 2011 4:29 PM
Reminds me of WWII when they arrested Japanese Americans for potential terrorist acts. The security of this country is A1 however we can not cross over into areas where we become like the countries that are out to destroy us. Lets not rot from the interior. The census data is for the census only. Yes
Don Brown Jr's comment, July 8, 2012 10:27 PM
Their is to much emphasis on reacting to crime and not enough effort put into investing into programs that can prevent it. This lack of understanding in what causes criminal activity makes discrimination much easier. The government should be focusing more on reducing factors that cause crimes such as low education levels and scarce job opportunity if they really wanted have a positive impact.
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Daily Show: The Amazing Racism - Geographical Bigotry

Wyatt Cenac reports on racially charged geographical names in America.

 

Discretion is advised since there is some offensive language in this comedy sketch.  Yet underneath is a serious point about racially insensitive toponyms and their legacy in the United States (recently in the news with Gov. Perry in Texas).  Geographer Mark Monmonier tackles this topic in his book, "From Squaw Tit to Whorehouse Meadow: How Maps Name, Claim, and Inflame."


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Un-Fair Campaign

Un-Fair Campaign | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

The University of Wisconsin-Superior is in one of the least ethnically diverse regions of the United States and the university is partnering with other local organizations across that region aimed at highlighting structural advantages within society for Caucasians.  This campaign to make 'white privilege' visible has not surprisingly generated controversy and has made race and its impact of society an issue quite visible, to the discomfort of many.   The author of the book, "Colorblind," speaks about this issue on PBS as he argues that the United States is not in a post-racial society. 

Questions to Ponder:  In what tangible ways can you see 'white privilege' in our society?  Is this ad campaign a good idea?  What does the term normativity mean and how does it relate to this topic? 

Tags: race, racism, culture, unit 3 culture, book review and ethnicity.


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Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 4, 2012 11:56 AM
I believe this campaign is being made aware in the Wisconsin area of the U.S. because the population is primarily white. Therefore, this region may be trying to make its people aware of the fact that racism can still exist even though this region may be ignorant to this issue. And this region is not to blame for its ignorance because a vast, non-diverse racial community is all they are exposed to, and all they know.
Seth Dixon's comment, September 4, 2012 9:29 PM
I think some people feel that pointing out institutionalized bias feels as though the campaign is blaming them for simply being white. I had a special blue ticket to go to the front of the DMV line today and I was thrilled but it made me think about the others still waiting. There's an analogy in there but I don't want to force it.
steffiquah's curator insight, July 16, 2014 7:25 AM

There is no logic as to why whites should be treated better than the blacks. It is society being biased and we could make a difference. A colour shouldn't define a person's personality, fate, or future. We should not be biased towards them but instead, give them fair and equal opportunities as any other people. I personally do not think racism should be a problem in the first place. What makes them discriminate blacks and make them lower than the whites in the first place? I hope something can be done about this.

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Asians in the U.S. labor force, 2008–2010

Asians in the U.S. labor force, 2008–2010 | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Editor's Desk: U.S.Bureau of Labor Statistics...

 

Ethnic geography, migration and economic geography intersect in this compelling infographic. 


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Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 9:56 AM

This chart shows the labor force from 2008 to 2010. It what kind of races were active in the labor force and the percentage the race made up of the labor force. It also shows what kind of work they did and how much of the percentage of that race was involved in a specific line of work.

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Perspectives: Reconsider Columbus Day

Reconsider Columbus Day Presented by Nu Heightz Cinema rethink columbus day reconsider christopher columbus anti columbus day...

 

Without need to adopt one particular ideological perspective, this can be used to discuss distinct cultural perspectives and show how we frame geographic and historic information in our own context.


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Where are the people of color in national parks?

Where are the people of color in national parks? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
While the American public has grown increasingly diverse in the last decade, black and Hispanic-Americans remain underrepresented in visits to U.S. national parks, according to a new report.

 

What factors help to explain the differences in National park visitations between?  What does this say about the United States from a cultural perspective?


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