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India's Potty Problem

India's Potty Problem | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Which statement is true? 

 

A. 60% of all households without toilets in the world are in India.
B. India’s Muslims are less affected by the sanitation problem than Hindus.
C. India’s lack of toilets is worse than China’s.
D. Lack of toilets in India puts women at especially high risk.


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Brett Laskowitz's curator insight, April 19, 7:41 PM

Excellent article for sparking discussion on the costs of development.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 22, 6:37 PM

Unfathomable to see that all of these are true, but at the same time not unbelievable.  I can see sanitation problems being relevant wherever there is overpopulation in the world.  Especially here where Muslims are defecating outside as a part of ritual, you wonder if they would use toilets even if they had them.  India is lucky they don't have some disease running ram,pant that can kill large portions of their population in a hurry like the plague in England.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 24, 10:48 AM

In America, this story is not fathomable.  The sanitation problem in India goes beyond cultural norms, in my opinion.  I think it is evident of an infrastructure that is way behind the country's socioeconomic level of growth.  It seems like finally, after electing a new prime minister, that there will be much focus brought on the issue.  It also seems that if they don't shore up this sanitation issue that they will have a bigger epidemic on their hands, as there have been recent murders and rapes of young women in these sanitation fields.

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Vegan food truck makes rounds in 'food deserts'

Vegan food truck makes rounds in 'food deserts' | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Baruch Ben-Yehudah is tackling Prince George’s County’s "food desert" problem. His vegan food truck delivers nourishment to neighborhoods lacking fresh groceries.

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nicole Musset's curator insight, September 14, 2013 1:55 PM

la terre peut offrir de la nourriture à tous ses habitants;mais les interets personnels,la recherche de profits et l'absence de plus en plus grande de conscience "écolologique"....une personne comme Baruch Ben Yehuda est tres importante pour ceux qui souffrent du manque de ressources.

Patricia Stitson's curator insight, September 20, 2013 10:38 PM

After having just driven across country this year I am very in touch with the fact that this model needs to be replicated across the US.

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, October 24, 2013 1:03 PM

This food truck is bringing healthy, vegan food, to food deserts. A food desert is a place where healthy food is not accesable to the population, which is always impoverished. These people typically rely on unhealthy/cheap foods that are high in fats, preservatives, and sugars. This leads to tremendous health issues for these populations. Sure, this food truck is making a profit but it is also providing a wonderful service to the community, exposure to healthy foods and an alternative to the norm.

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T-Shirt Travels

When filmmaker Shantha Bloemen was stationed in a remote village in Zambia as a worker with an international aid organization, she had to adjust to living in a different culture. But one thing struck her as oddly familiar: almost everyone in the village wore secondhand clothing from the West. Bloemen began to imagine stories about the people who used to wear the clothing, wondering if the original owners had any idea that the castoffs they had given to charities ended up being sold to Africans half a world away.


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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, July 19, 2013 9:48 AM

It's fascinating to look at the effects of globalization, and a great look at how economies change.  When people in the Western world drop a bag of clothes off at a charity, I doubt we think they'd end up in a village in Africa. Warning:  it does get a little preachy at the end. 

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:44 PM

Is direct aid a good thing or not? How does secondhand clothing impact local economies?

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:57 PM

Westernization is a popular theme thats happening in the East. Even though people don't know it, the clothes they give away may be some that are taken to places like Africa. Hand-me-downs are popular in the U.S. but even more so in Africa. The t-shirt you give away to someone might end up across the world. Who knows.

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My escape from North Korea

"As a child growing up in North Korea, Hyeonseo Lee thought her country was 'the best on the planet.' It wasn't until the famine of the 90s that she began to to wonder. She escaped the country at 14, to begin a life in hiding, as a refugee in China. Hers is a harrowing, personal tale of survival and hope."


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윤지현's curator insight, November 6, 2014 6:59 PM

I have ever met a person who escaped from North Korea. Her story was like a very scary movie. If I become a teacher in the future, I will do my best to a student from North Korea.

서병기's curator insight, November 6, 2014 7:00 PM

Because of the tragedies of history, there are still scattered family both in South and North Korea. Please hope for the unification of the Korean Peninsula.

Julia Kang's curator insight, November 6, 2014 8:45 PM

So many North Koreans are suffering from poverty. They do not have any food and we should pay more attention to them. This video was quite interesting!

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The Real World at Night

The Real World at Night | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Earlier I have posted the classic image of "Earth Lights at Night," and discussed the classroom uses of the image.  This cartogram helps take that analysis one step further.  This cartogram helps students to visualize the magnitude of population (with the cartogram adjusting area for population) and then to see the patterns of energy use, global consumption and urbanization with in a new light. 

 

Tags: remote sensing, worldwide, consumption, poverty, population, spatial, political, regions.


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Matt Mallinson's comment, October 1, 2012 11:29 AM
This map is obviously not the actual size of countries, but it is in a way. The populations of China and India are so great compared to the rest of the world and this map shows that.
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The Hidden Cost of Counting the Homeless

The Hidden Cost of Counting the Homeless | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

A professor criticizes the "culture of quantification," (in the journal cultural geographies) arguing that we don't do enough with the data we collect.  If all we do is count (or attempt to count the homeless), does that help them in any way or change the realities that lead to homelessness?  Are we counting them just to give us the numbers to receive credit that may help other programs but not help the homeless?  Is data for data's sake of any value?


UPDATE: Another geographer noted some other issues of homelessness on the website facebook page, specifically in regard to this map of homelessness: "A problem associated with this map is that while the numbers get smaller, it raises the question: where did they go? (answer: Hollywood, after an emphasis on policing pushed them out)...this could be tied in to a discussion about map scale."

 

Tags: statistics, class, census, socioeconomic, housing, poverty.


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Teaching Race and Poverty in the wake of "If I Was A Poor Black Kid"

Teaching Race and Poverty in the wake of "If I Was A Poor Black Kid" | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Let me explain: this particular article has created a firestorm of controversy online.  All of the debated points center on how we think about race and  poverty in the USA.  I'm most certainly not endorsing this article as a 'stand-alone' source of information, but rather a jumping off point to discuss some difficult questions that, fundamentally are geographic in nature.   This is a difficult subject, so sometimes we feel more comfortable just ignoring the topic...I feel that is a disservice to our students.   

 

Personally, what I want my students to understand and get out of this is two-fold: the advice that Gene Marks makes to individuals to pursue educational opportunities to improve their situation is excellent and sound.  The problem lies in that this individual advice is being proposed as a societal remedy for larger, structural problems.  In essence it is a problem of scale.  What is good advice for the individual with not cure all the ails of systemic problems that go far beyond needs education.  What do you want your students to get out of this debate/discussion?     

Some sample rebuttal articles:

http://www.dominionofnewyork.com/2011/12/13/if-i-were-the-middle-class-white-guy-gene-marks/#.TuodE3qwXh_

 

 

http://www.good.is/post/an-ode-to-a-poor-black-kid-i-never-knew-how-forbes-gets-it-wrong/

And a snippet of a more scholarly piece "Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria:"

http://www.rci.rutgers.edu/~jdowd/tatum-blackkids.pdf


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Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 12:36 AM

Gene Marks probably should have chosen a different topic to write about, or at least one that could be deemed less offensive.  He does have sound advice for those "poor black kids," but only those living in a perfect world can follow his advice fully.  It's easy to say you are going to be the most perfect student you can be, but if you live in an environment where parental supervision is low, a goal such as that is harder to achieve.  Parents in these areas do not stress it enough that being a top notch student is a necessity.  This is not a one dimensional issue. 

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The Unaddressed Link Between Poverty and Education

The Unaddressed Link Between Poverty and Education | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Federal education policy seems blind to the relationship between poverty and student performance.

 

An interesting op-ed that focuses on the educational performance in the United States and poverty.  The authors feel that class is an obvious factor in educational performance, but that educational policies do not reflect the geographic factors that lead to uneven results. 


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Mindy Tan's curator insight, February 22, 2014 9:44 AM

From this article, I can see that children that are poorer actually get lower results as compared to those that are well fed. I think it is because they dont have a good environment to study in, do not have well-educated parents to guide them along and teach them and most importantly, they are not well-fed and they do not have enough nutritions to help them think or concentrate better. I wonder why they would  put the 'rich' and 'poor' kids together? Putting them together will only result in the richer kids looking down on the poorer kids.

rlavinya's curator insight, February 23, 2014 8:26 AM

It saddens be that children can't be educated just cause of their lack of money.Poverty an educations plays a huge role in a child's life.WIthout education how are they gona lead in life?Why can't the poor be edcuated for free?

rlavinya's curator insight, February 24, 2014 8:02 AM

Education and poverty.In simple terms mostly if a child does not have enough money it'll affect their education. It saddens be that children can't be educated just cause of their lack of money.Poverty an educations plays a huge role in a child's life.WIthout education how are they gona lead in life?Why can't the poor be edcuated for free?What puzzles be the most is why isn't it free for those who cant afford it?

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Agriculture and Rural Development Day UN Climate Talks

Agriculture and Rural Development Day UN Climate Talks | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Farmers are at the forefront of dealing with climate change around the world. How are they coping, and what opportunities do the shifts present?

 

An excellent set resources discussing the plight of farmers various regional and ecological situations.  From the famers in Mozambique impacted by unreliable rainfall to Guyana farmers at risk from rising sea fells, climate change is impacting the most vulnerable (and the least responsible) the hardest.  


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BBC: Development-How bottles bring light to world's poorest

BBC: Development-How bottles bring light to world's poorest | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
A simple initiative in the Philippines is bringing a bit of brightness into the lives of the country's poorest people.

 

This clip is brimming with classroom potential.  Development is a key component to this clip, but it could also become a service learning project as students adopt a great project to help others in more difficult financial situations.  Learn more about the project at: http://isanglitrongliwanag.org/


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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 12:32 PM

The term "one man's trash is another man's treasure" is brought to new light with this video. Increased urbanization in the Philippines is creating a landscape of small, wall-to-wall huts with no windows. The lack of natural light coupled with limited energy resources makes these houses incredibly dark on the inside. One man figured out an ingenious  way to battle this issue while also reusing materials that otherwise would be considered trash. By using plastic soda bottles and a bleach solution, this man has created a type of skylight, providing light to those living in the slums of Philippines. 

 

This project has incredible potential not just in the Philippines, but on a global scale. Self-help housing all over the world could benefit from a light source while decreasing local problems with plastic waste.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:31 PM

This is very innovative as people in the Philippines have found a way to light their homes with just a plastic bottle. Using bleach and water and a piece of metal, there is temporary light for many people who would otherwise live in darkness. Starting with just 1 bottle in 1 home, this homemade product's total is now 15,000 units. I was very impressed that something as simple as a bottle filled with water can cost just $1 to make and give off even more light than an average light-bulb. I predict that this mini invention will become even more widespread as more poor countries catch on to this new, resourceful idea. 

Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 26, 3:45 PM

The solution to a problem in this video owes itself to geographical factors, had this been a problem in the US, the solution would have been different.  Having said this, the "American Way" to solve problems isn't always the best way to do so.  The Philippines is a collection of islands and they are ravaged by hurricanes, so to put above ground powerlines would be highly expensive, and to connect the whole nations infrastructure would require the nation running very expensive powerlines underneath the ocean.  What the man does in this video is ingenious given the location and the solution to the problem.  Since the Philippines are a warm country and the houses only have a single roof layer, by cutting a whole in the roof taping a coke bottle into the whole (filled with water and a bit of chlorine) allows a cheap and effective source of light.  By doing this, the people will not have to spend a great deal on electricity (if it is in their region) and if they do not have electricity then they still have a source of light. 

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Poverty pervades the suburbs

Poverty pervades the suburbs | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
More people in poverty live in America's suburbs than in cities or rural areas. And their numbers are multiplying fast, overwhelming social service agencies' ability to help them.

 

The socio-economic structure of our cities is changing as suburbs are increasingly becoming places of poverty.  The map highlights that the Central Valley of California is the worst region in regards to this trend. 


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IfItWereMyHome.com

IfItWereMyHome.com | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

How to foster geographic empathy in the classroom discussion about development? Here's one way.  This link compares MANY countries' demographics in a very personal manner. 


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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 26, 2012 9:29 PM
Globalization discussions about raising disparity within countries often overshadow the growing inequalities between countries. What qualifies as middle class in the United States can be the equivalent of an upper-class lifestyle for many nations around the world. The same can be said in comparing what the poor in America have access to in comparison to many developing countries.
Mr. Verdugo's curator insight, March 21, 2013 10:08 PM

North - South. Here we have a glance of the differences

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 8:54 AM

A great resource to compare the liveability of countries using a range of criteria. 

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India's Potty Problem

India's Potty Problem | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Which statement is true? 

 

A. 60% of all households without toilets in the world are in India.
B. India’s Muslims are less affected by the sanitation problem than Hindus.
C. India’s lack of toilets is worse than China’s.
D. Lack of toilets in India puts women at especially high risk.


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Brett Laskowitz's curator insight, April 19, 7:41 PM

Excellent article for sparking discussion on the costs of development.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 22, 6:37 PM

Unfathomable to see that all of these are true, but at the same time not unbelievable.  I can see sanitation problems being relevant wherever there is overpopulation in the world.  Especially here where Muslims are defecating outside as a part of ritual, you wonder if they would use toilets even if they had them.  India is lucky they don't have some disease running ram,pant that can kill large portions of their population in a hurry like the plague in England.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 24, 10:48 AM

In America, this story is not fathomable.  The sanitation problem in India goes beyond cultural norms, in my opinion.  I think it is evident of an infrastructure that is way behind the country's socioeconomic level of growth.  It seems like finally, after electing a new prime minister, that there will be much focus brought on the issue.  It also seems that if they don't shore up this sanitation issue that they will have a bigger epidemic on their hands, as there have been recent murders and rapes of young women in these sanitation fields.

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Developed vs developing maps

Developed vs developing maps | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Geography can be difficult to teach - sometimes it can seem like it's mostly just facts and places. Regions. Types of mining in different places. Weather patterns. Vegetation. Lots of, well . . . b...

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dilaycock's curator insight, July 18, 2013 3:40 AM

Interesting ways to stimulate discussion of Developed and Developing Worlds.


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Gabe Tucker's comment, September 10, 2013 8:33 PM
It is quite obvious to see which countries are developed and which countries are still developing. The obvious developed areas are the USA, Western Europe, and a majority of India and China. The developing areas are South America, Eastern Europe/Asia, and Australia. Africa is mostly undeveloped. These trends are due to technology and finances. The countries with the most technology are more developed, and the countries with the least technology are still developing or are not developed at all.
Justin McFarland's comment, September 12, 2013 9:32 PM
It's interesting to see what countries have developed and what countries are still finding there way in this world; whether its with technology, government policy, but in this case ... its maps.
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The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism

The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Researchers are heading to Dharavi, Mumbai, to study the impact of slum tours on the residents.

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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 8:36 PM

I don’t find nothing right about tourist visiting the slum, I feel that the tourist are violating there privacy. They are human being not some historical landmark. If the tourist are not helping this people why are they going? If you are going to visit this places do it because you want to help them, not because you think is interesting their way of living.

Cam E's curator insight, April 1, 2014 11:57 AM

Moral questions are always fun. Personally I don't think going to see slums is all that exploitative in itself, but I would make a distinction between guided tours that cost money, and self-directed tours though. In a guided tour you are paying money to walk through a community and view what life is like for those people, but in a self-directed tour you are just another person walking down the streets and viewing whatever you stumble upon. There are plenty of tours within neighborhoods of different economic value the world over, but these tours are scrutinized because the people touring are as wealthy, or less wealthy, than the people living there. I don't think that a poor community changes this dynamic in an immoral way, as the perceptions of which group is superior come from the own minds of those who feel uncomfortable with it.

 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 2014 9:41 AM

This article rises in interesting question.  Are tours of slums exploitive or beneficial to the slum dwellers?  On the one hand the tours could feel like exploitation and the tourist is viewing attractions at a “zoo”, on the other hand it brings people far removed from slum life in contact with it and can change people’s point of view on the slums.  It can be beneficial if the tour guides donate money to the slums or jobs are sought by slum dwellers to become tour guides.  The question is should slums be hidden away from view or opened up to tourists so that they can see the hardships first hand.  I think that this is an issue that is not clearly black or white; there are many shades of gray involved in this issue.

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Gendered Differences in Development

Gendered Differences in Development | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Being a woman can be much more difficult, based on where you live. 

 


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The State of Women in the World

The State of Women in the World | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Tags: gender, development, worldwide, poverty.


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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 12, 2013 1:39 PM

Gender Development index - CHapter 9 materials

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:09 AM

This is a great represenaton for showing the unfortunate truth of the state women in the world today.

Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 11:15 AM

Why are women so unequal to men? Why are women in the Middle East seeing such bad treatment and unequality? How can we fix these problems?

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Photos that bear witness to modern slavery

TED Talks For the past two years, photographer Lisa Kristine has traveled the world, documenting the unbearably harsh realities of modern-day slavery.

 

This is a chilling glimpse into the worst and darkest side of the economic systems of geography and labor in the world. It is estimated that there are more than 25 million people who today live in state that can be described as modern-day slavery. We should not discuss slavery only in the past tense, and yet it conflicts with how most people conceptualize the world today.

 

Questions to Ponder: How can this even be happening in the 21st century? What geographic and economic forces lead to these situations portrayed in this TED talk? What realistically could be done to lessen the amount of slavery in the world today?

 

Tags: TED, labor, economic, class, poverty, South Asia, Africa, video.


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Kyle Toner's comment, November 6, 2012 12:17 PM
This video truly opened eyes into the conflict of modern day slavery. I had no idea just how prevalent, global and horrible this situation is.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 6, 2013 10:51 AM

This is a chilling glimpse into the worst and darkest side of the economic systems of geography and labor in the world. It is estimated that there are more than 25 million people who today live in state that can be described as modern-day slavery. We should not discuss slavery only in the past tense, and yet it conflicts with how most people conceptualize the world today.


Questions to Ponder: How can this even be happening in the 21st century? What geographic and economic forces lead to these situations portrayed in this TED talk? What realistically could be done to lessen the amount of slavery in the world today?


Tags: TED, labor, economic, class, poverty, South Asia, Africa, video.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 31, 4:34 PM

A truly sad reality is exposed in this well-produced video.  Many of us hear about slavery still happening around us but I think most of us brush it off as little more than taboo.  To see these photos and to hear this woman's firsthand account is shocking.  If you are not instantly moved to want to help, I don't know if you're human.  This is atrocious and I only pray that one day this reality comes to an end.

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U.S. AID education/poverty infographic

U.S. AID education/poverty infographic | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

An excellent infographic that highlights the importance of education in the process of fighting poverty.  Why is education (especially women) so pivotal for development?  Should this change how we think about humanitarian aid?       


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Fiqah Nasrin's curator insight, January 27, 2014 8:37 AM

From this article i get to know that a child who born to an educated mother will benefit more than a child who born to mothers without an education. Quite a number of women in the world are without a proper education. Is it fair to women without a proper education to be condemn to be told that their child will do poorly rather than a child of an educated mothers. Their child would eventually suceed through hard work and support from their family.

Zemus Koh's curator insight, January 27, 2014 10:11 AM

From this infographic, I can see the importance of education and how it can impact us in our lives. Education is key as it can help us in many ways such as being able to teach our offspings survival skills and also help us to earn more so that we can bring up a family and support them. However important education is, it still comes with a price. As such, many are deprived of this oppurtunity to be educated even though education is somewhat considered a neccessity. Other benefits of education to women include a lesser chance of contracting STDs and also having a higher chance to immunize their children compared to non-educated women. Since education is a key to survival and an important part in our lives, why is it that no effort is made to promote this or to fund more projects that help the less fortunate to get a chance to be educated?

Fiqah Nasrin's curator insight, February 23, 2014 7:28 AM

This article tells me that a child who born to an educated mother will benefit more than a child who born to mothers without an education. Quite a number of women in the world are without a proper education. Is it fair to women without a proper education to be condemn to be told that their child will do poorly rather than a child of an educated mothers. Their child would eventually succeed through hard work and support from their family. It stated that most children who drop out from school are girls and most of the people cant read live in developing countries. In this century i am sure that proper education are given to those who could not afford it as everyone want to succeed. I think that it does not matter if a child's mother is without an education as they can succeed if they work hard and opportunity is given to them.

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Map of the Day: America's Poverty Belt

Map of the Day: America's Poverty Belt | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The poor in the U.S.are disproportionately clustered in a handful of southern states...

 

This image is worth an entire class period of economic geography...


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The Geography of Hunger and Food Insecurity

Why are some communities more vulnerable to hunger and famine? There are many reasons, which together add up to food insecurity, the world's no.1 health risk...

 

Excellent summary of the geographic factors that lead to food insecurity and hunger and the main ways NGO's are trying to combat the issues.   This is an incredibly complex problem that, at it's heart, is a geographic issue that can challenge student to synthesize information and make the connections between topics.  


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, December 5, 2011 1:02 AM
This is a incredible clip that does challenge students to synthesize information and make the connections between topics, but it can also help students to realize making a difference at a early age is important. I learned an abundance of facts just from watching, it was informative and intriguing. As I was watching the video I was thinking of ways it can be incorporated into the classroom. This video could get students to learn about the world's number one health risk. Incorporating it into the classroom by holding a food drive, or having a school wide fundraiser to donate to the British Red Cross is also another way to help. Getting our future minds informed and helping the community will make an impact in the future.
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Video: Fighting Poverty with Ingenuity

I absolutely love creative, out-of-the-box, innovative people! People who use their creativity to make a difference in the World.... Incredible! "We want to ...

 

Find out more about this organization at: http://isanglitrongliwanag.org/

 


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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 4:31 PM

This another fantastic example of people in areas of little and poverty making due with that they have on hand. While many in America can imagine life without our modern necessities in fact both historically and contemporary people have always determined ways to get the fullest extent out of the materials at hand. This video shows how innovation and some common good is able to help the whole community. We in the Western World can definitely learn a few things from situations such as this.   

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:49 PM

Poverty stricken areas are filled with very intelligent and skilled people who are trapped in their economic status. These solar bottles show how creative people can be no matter where they come from. Furthermore, these types of innovations show how the sadness of living in poverty can be lifted a small amount with recycling and creativity.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 13, 9:18 PM

This is such a fantastic idea. Once again, in an area that is forced to adapt people will. Here  the “Solar Demi” was able to work within his environment to come up with an alternate way to light homes. It is great that he is doing this given how it affects the areas health and productivity.

Some people in the United States may think this contraption beneath them though. However, I also think that in some ways this is a better form of energy for places that have the access to solar light. I know that most electric lighting in our country uses some form of fossil fuel, which impacts the environment in an adverse manner when used too much. Since the ozone layer is already doing poorly, areas that are trying to develop would just as more harm to the equation. So I love this, not just for the creativity but also because it seems to be more economically friendly.

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AfriGadget

AfriGadget | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

One of the coolest websites ever..."solving everyday problems with African ingenuity." While the developed world lives in a commercial, disposable society, Africans often need to maximize the useablity of all objects.  The solutions they come up with can show students that it is not all doom and gloom in Africa.  


Via Seth Dixon
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Cam E's curator insight, March 18, 2014 12:31 PM

This is some really cool stuff! This is a good showcase of human ingenuity. We have no need to create our own helicopters here in the United States in our backyards, but this shows that with the technical know-how, a lot of savings money, and raw supplies, it's entirely possible for anyone to build one. The impressiveness in this article lies in the ability for these individuals to make something extremely complex on their own rather than rely on pre-built, expensive models.