AP Human Geography Education
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How Cities Use Design to Drive Homeless People Away

How Cities Use Design to Drive Homeless People Away | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Saying 'you're not welcome here'—with spikes."


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Michael MacNeil's curator insight, August 2, 2014 8:38 AM

Lack of understanding of mental disability can lead to heartlessness. There is so much that needs to be done.

dilaycock's curator insight, August 3, 2014 3:50 AM

I'd never really taken notice, or heard of some,  of the architectural deterrents mentioned here. I can't believe that we, as a society, go to such lengths to make life even more difficult for those already struggling. 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:52 PM

APHG-U7

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What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline

What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Picture this: Tourists visiting one of your city's most prominent attractions are unable to see it because of smog, haze and a bevy of other airborne pollutants. What's the solution?

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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 22, 2015 7:17 PM

Major cities in the world should take a deeper look into controlling pollution problems in their cities.  At some point, these places will no longer attract people to live in these areas, thus lowering the impact that these industries may have.  But as long as people are still living here by the millions and there is tourism, and buisness is booming, nothing will be done about the issue.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:08 PM

Summer reading KQ4: pollution, smog, megacity, sustainability

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 25, 2015 6:22 AM

Pollution is a huge issue facing both Hong Kong, and the rest of China in general. So far the government  has done little to actually combat the problem. The Chinese governments response has been to pretend that the problem does not really exist. A fake skyline can just erase the problem. In reality dealing with the pollution issue would actually help the Chinese economy. When people seek to go on a vacation, they are seeking a destination that is clean and safe. Who wants to visit a place were, you have to ware a mask to prevent the breathing in of armful chemicals. A cleaner less polluted china would lead to an expanded tourism industry.

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Beijing's Pollution

Beijing's Pollution | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 24, 2014 2:21 PM

Great picture to show the two sectors of China's society. In Beijing we see the combination of industry and post industrialized. 

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 24, 2014 11:40 PM

This picture taken by a photographer with the perfect lighting is brilliant....that is, if you're into deceiving people that the pollution from these power plants stays away from the higher class businesses and residences.  Looking at this picture you see the smoke coming from the power plant in China far in the distance creating a yellowish hue that could be thought to be from the sun.  Then closer in the scene we see what appears to be businesses and potentially some peoples homes.  This area is in a totally different color from the yellow we see to be associated with the pollution from the power plant.  Here we see a blue, commonly associated with clean water, covering the entirety of this area.  With the difference in colors these places seem to be as different as possible from each other.  In reality though, smog doesn't just stay in one area of the city where it is produced, but spreads throughout the entirety of a city.  There are no restraints on where the pollution can and can't be, it is free flowing into communities where people work and live.  If you're trying to sell a house here this picture wouldn't be a bad idea to use, although most natives aren't oblivious to what is really going on.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 8:00 PM

This picture is interesting to say the least, it depicts two different cities, even though it is the same city. the picture does a good job at showing the major problem that pollution is causing to Beijing. While showing a smog surrounded city behind a clean, yet clouded looking city, drives this point of pollution home and raises the question is putting large factories and toxic fumes in the air, more important than the well being of your citizens?

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Ultra-Dense Housing

Ultra-Dense Housing | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated areas in the world. Seven million people living in 423 square miles (1,096 sq km).

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 5:57 PM

Wow, I cannot imagine living in these conditions. It looks smaller than a prison cell; only people pay to live there. These extreme living conditions are a result of over population in an area. It seems the city of Hong Kong is running out of places to build and house the abundance of people living there. It appears the average person in Hong Kong lives in these conditions due to the high price tags on larger apartments. This is a sad reality.   

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 2014 11:06 AM

Living in such close quarters must be incredibly hard to do for those people who are new to Hong Kong and know something different. For Chinese residents, this is normal. Living in such small areas is a part of the Chinese daily life and culture. China is so population dense that this is the result of living there, tiny living spaces.

James Hobson's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:47 PM

(in-class 4: Hong Kong)

What I take away from this is the theme of supply and demand. Though these condiions seem stereotypically negative, it seems like those who live in the photographed homes are relatvely well off (food, TV, clothing, etc.). This supports the view that living in these tight conditions is less of a choice and more of something that has to be put up with. Now that Hong Kong has been developed 'across', it'd be a good guess to say that recently investments have been made to build 'up' with highrises and skyscrapers (unless like Dubai they sat to mak either own islands, whic geographically would be less likely here). The questionof sustainability is also an issue, i.e. at what point will it be impossible to cram in any more inhabitants? I wonder if a future migration / spreading-out into other areas has started to occur yet or will soon, like the suburbanization which occured in the U.S. after the advent of the automobile. If so, would it be mainland China, despite the political tensions?

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A Photo Essay on School Sprawl

A Photo Essay on School Sprawl | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Schools used to be the heart of a neighborhood or community. Children and not a few teachers could walk to class, or to the playground or ball field on the weekend. This was relatively easy to do, because the schools were placed within, not separated from, their neighborhoods. They were human-scaled and their architecture was not just utilitarian, but signaled their importance in the community. Now it has become hard to tell one from a Walmart or Target."

 

What better way to demonstrate the concepts of urban sprawl, automobile-dependent city planning and economies of scale than by analyzing the very geographic context of our schools themselves?  This is a very nicely arranged photo essay that most could spark conversation and would foster some discussion on how best to plan neighborhoods and spatially arrange the city.   

 

Tags: transportation, planning, sprawl, education, scale. 


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Op-Ed: "Anti-Vehicle Bullying"

Op-Ed: "Anti-Vehicle Bullying" | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Jerry Dobrovolny, Vancouver’s director of transportation, has a lot of nerve trying to spin a tale that the city’s new transportation plan isn’t “focused on a war on the car.” He should walk across the street from city hall to Yuk Yuk’s comedy club...

 

Not everyone (especially not the author of the linked editorial) is a fan of Smart Growth and other urban planning paradigms that promote alternative forms of transportation (categorized in the editorial as anti-vehicle bullying).  

 

Questions to Ponder: Does Vancouver's planning seem "anti-vehicle" to you?  Are some places "anti-cycling" or "anti-walking?"  What would these places look like? What do you see as the best transportation model for our cities?  

 

Tags: transportation, urban, planning, sustainability. 


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Lauren Moss's comment, November 2, 2012 8:20 PM
Thanks for sharing a very interesting perspective on a very relevant issue... I think LA exemplifies an 'anti-pedestrian/cycling' city, though the factors (historic patterns of development, social + cultural issues, etc.) that contribute to this condition are varied and complex. In a similar vein, though I advocate smart growth principles, implementation definitely has its own complexities, as expressed in the Op-Ed above. Regardless, always glad to learn more about the topic- appreciate the share!
Betty Denise's comment, November 3, 2012 6:53 AM
Thanks for commenting
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Urban Density and Design

http://www.ted.com How can cities help save the future? Alex Steffen shows some cool neighborhood-based green projects that expand our access to things we wa...

 

Urban density and design connected with energy usage and climate change. 


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Samantha Fuller's curator insight, September 27, 2013 1:44 PM

We think that the climate change has to do with using fossil fuels. And althogh creating a clean sourse of energy is a good plan it doesn't solve everything. Soon we will not be able to create enough energy for everyone who uses it.

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Sustainable cities must be compact and high-density

Sustainable cities must be compact and high-density | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
George Monbiot: As the balance of the world's population tips from rural to urban, we need strict urban planning to keep cities from collapse...

This article provides perspectives on the future of urbanization and the ecological framework within which we build our cities. 


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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 9, 2012 8:47 PM
This article makes me think about the organization of urban demographics in Rhode Island. It puts into question the significance of the invisible lines that separate the boarders of Cranston, Central Falls, Pawtucket, Providence and East Providence today.
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One Path to Better Jobs: More Density in Cities

One Path to Better Jobs: More Density in Cities | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Building more housing in cities will make them more dense, but everyone will benefit.

 

This is an interesting op-ed that focuses on urban density patterns and the economic structure of the jobs available in the city.  Good to use when discussing economies of scale, market threshold, agglomeration, etc. 


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morgan knight's curator insight, March 10, 2015 10:15 AM

A more dense city might be more productive, but will it always be able to stay that way? A city that is in the middle of a boom will attract a large amount of people seeking jobs, which in just a few years will overpopulate the urban area. It may be better to stay in the suburbs, or even maybe the rural areas of the U.S. Continue to build America's cities, and create more space for people to move into for work.

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Developing World Cities and Population Density

Developing World Cities and Population Density | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Without a question, we are living in an urban era. More people now live in cities than anywhere else on the planet and I’ve repeatedly argued that cities are our most important economic engine. As a result of these shifts, we’re seeing megacities at a scale the world has never seen before.

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Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 27, 2014 12:05 PM
المدن الأعلى كثافة بالسكان على مستوى العالم
Sally Egan's curator insight, June 29, 2014 9:31 PM

Mega cities and the challenges they face for the future is focus in this article. Great statistics on populations and urban densities are also included.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:47 PM

APHG-U6

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Bike Share Map

Bike Share Map | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Visualisation for bike shares across the world.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 28, 2013 9:10 AM

Many cities (including Denver) have active bike share programs to ease congestion and foster a less automobile-centric urban design.  London, Paris and Mexico City are a handful of the international cities listed here but it isn't only the largest cities (Hello Lillestrøm, Norway!).  In the U.S., it is the same with typical cities (NYC and Washington DC) as well as as some smaller cities (Chattanooga and Omaha).  Is your city on the list


Tags: transportation, urban, planning.

Louis Culotta's curator insight, July 4, 2013 5:13 PM

This is great...They should have this on the east bay bike path in the Bristol, Warren & Barrington area. I went out on it today and it was so busy they could have set up some traffic cops on it to pull some people over with so meny near collisions of people riding and walking together.

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The Big Squeeze: Can Cities Save The Earth?

The Big Squeeze: Can Cities Save The Earth? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
What if you put all 7 billion humans into one city, a city as dense as New York, with its towers and skyscrapers? How big would that 7 billion-sized city be? As big as New Jersey? Texas? Bigger? Are cities protecting wild spaces on the planet?

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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 2:12 PM

Its been known that Americans have lavish lifestyles compared to outher populous countries. In this article they show a represntation if the entire world lived like (had as much space) americans and it was astoudning. It would take 4 earths to fit the world if everyone had this lavish lifestyle. So we obviously need to change our ways. Cities ae very helpful to sharing this earth. They serve as a main hub so youll only have to ship to a few places. This with the shortening of distances would save tons of gas and othe rescources. But as the article states everyone living in a Main city wouldnt be possible because people need to produce outside the city. So in my opinion for this city world to work it would need to be a few megacities preferably one on each continent and for them to the city be surronded by production methods.

Bryan Chung's curator insight, May 8, 2014 7:40 PM

cool

Peter Hillman's curator insight, July 22, 2014 11:42 PM

An interactive site for comparisons of city sizes

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Flexible Urban Planning

mixed used train-tracks/market place...

 

I've used similar videos in my classes and students are usually quite shocked to see how a city like Bangkok, Thailand operates.  I've used this as a 'hook' for lessons of population growth, urbanization, economic development, sustainability, megacities and city planning. 


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Kendra King's curator insight, April 13, 2015 9:15 PM

On the one hand this disturbed me. All I kept thinking when I saw the people go back on the tracks is that they could easily be killed.In fact, I wonder how many accidents have ever occurred near this area. All it would take is some sort of malfunction on the train in which the horn wasn’t sounding to provide ample warning or someone gets in another person’s way so there isn’t enough time to close down the shop. On the other hand, this made me realize just how efficient a population could become at using space. Everything was timed so that the entire area moved out of the way without an issue. So rather than let any land go to waste, the area uses it despite the risk to its population. Though it really isn't like the population has a choice though. So in instances where there is such overpopulation, it is interesting to see how well the society can adapt to the phenomenon. I do wonder what would happen if the country becomes more developed and the population declines. Would this type of land continue in the future or be disband? I know that in our country there are many laws that would make this illegal, but our country also has the space avoid developing the land in such a manner. When comparing it to the laws of the United States, I would think the country would eventually drift away from this use of land when possible. However, now that I watch the video, I have a new appreciation for maximizing land and I hope that the efficient could continue. Just in a less scary manner. 

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2015 2:51 PM

Talk about using every inch of space available to you.  I find this video crazy not only because of the safety hazards, but just how people seem to go about this like it is normal.  This would never take place in America!

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 7, 2015 1:29 PM

An absolute amazing dynamic is seen in this video.  To say that Bangkok is trying to use most of its open space up would be an understatement.  In developed countries, you would not only never see this happen but you would not even see a thought of doing something like this.  There are violations every where you look.  

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Making Sense of Maps

TED Talks Map designer Aris Venetikidis is fascinated by the maps we draw in our minds as we move around a city -- less like street maps, more like schematics or wiring diagrams, abstract images of relationships between places.

 

This video touches on numerous themes that are crucial to geographers including: 1) how our minds arrange spatial information, 2) how to best graphically represent spatial information in a useful manner for your audience and 3) how mapping a place can be the impetus for changing outdated systems. This is the story of how a cartographer working to improve a local transportation system map, which in turn, started city projects to improve the infrastructure and public utilities in Dublin, Ireland. This cartographer argues that the best map design for a transport system needs to conform to how on cognitive mental mapping works more so than geographic accuracy (like so many subway maps do).

 

Tags: transportation, urban, mapping, cartography, planning, TED, video, unit 7 cities.


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Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 14, 2012 3:42 PM
When trying to graphically represent spatial information in a useful manner for your particular audience, you will have a lot to take into consideration. How familiar are the travelers with the area you map out? Are there visuals to precisely mark on the map so that will they accurately correspond to the area?
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Why cities should dismantle highways

Why cities should dismantle highways | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
At TEDxPhilly, Next American City editor at large Diana Lind explains why cities should rethink their highway infrastructure.

 

For generations, the prominent model of urbanism accepted in the U.S. has placed the automobile as the top priority for public places, placing massive highways right in the middle of key downtown areas.  Some cities (including Denver, DC, NYC, Providence and Dallas) are rethinking the relationship between urban spaces and the transportation networks.  


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Turning Old Gas Stations into Good Urbanism

Turning Old Gas Stations into Good Urbanism | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Aurash Khawarzad looks at three projects that turned crude into gold, as old gas stations are quickly updated into a movie theater, a cafe and a restaurant.

 

Different models of energy usage and urban form would lead to a radically distinct urban environment. 

 


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ALLEGRET Nicolas's curator insight, December 2, 2014 10:46 AM

Ce petit article évoque la réutilisation d'anciennes stations services de carburant pour de nouveaux usages comme en faire des cafés, des restaurants et même des théâtres ! 

 

On pourrait appeler cela de la réhabilitation urbaine ou bien des "changements de destination" de ces bâtiments, ces termes techniques en urbanisme désigne parfaitement l'action qui est menée sur ces projets. 

 

Il faut aussi évoquer qu'en faisant cela les rues voient leur cachet augmenter, il n'y a donc à première vue que des aspects positifs. 

ZiyCharMatt's curator insight, March 3, 2015 8:59 PM

This artice talks about how these old gas stations changed into something urban like Movie theater, malls and etc.

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Next American City: Trees In Transit

Next American City: Trees In Transit | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Speed bumps, street markings, speed limits and other measures have all been used to create safer conditions for all users of the road. But what about trees?

 

A good link for discussing changes to the urban environment and city planning.


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elsa hunziker's comment, January 30, 2012 2:26 PM
Bucket list....
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"The Other Coast" Comic Strip

"The Other Coast" Comic Strip | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is an amusing, but still insightful way to discuss habitat encroachment, development, conservation and the economic utility of expansion. 


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