AP Human Geography Education
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The 'Underwater Waterfall' Illusion at Mauritius Island

The 'Underwater Waterfall' Illusion at Mauritius Island | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"When viewed from above, a runoff of sand and silt creates the impression of an ‘underwater waterfall’, just off the coast of the island nation of Mauritius in the Indian Ocean."


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, September 26, 2013 11:19 AM

this look pretty nice i would like to go see it in person

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:36 PM

By looking at this picture you automatically think its a waterfall within the water. This image is actually just showing the mix of sand and silt deposits mixing together. The light to dark colors is what makes it look like a waterfall. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:24 PM

Another spectacular sight. Of course, you will need a plane or helicopter to venture above it to see it, but this illusion is pretty nifty.

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10 Awe-Inspiring Weather Phenomena

10 Awe-Inspiring Weather Phenomena | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
There are reported cases of fish and frogs raining from the sky, as well as ice bombs attacking earthlings from above.

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FCHSAPGEO's comment, September 16, 2013 6:20 PM
I thought I would add that frogs do fly through the air sometimes!
Kamaryn Hunt's comment, October 7, 2013 6:28 PM
This post was interesting to me because living in Virginia Beach, we dont see much interesting amounts of snow, nor rainfall, so we dont know about the many things weather can do. Now knowing this about weather makes it more intersting,and makes me wonder what else could happen??
Cam E's curator insight, January 29, 2014 2:20 PM

The mystery of the world is personally one of my favorite topics, as we've not even come close to exploring every inch of our own planet. As much as I want to see us expand outwards, we should not avoid looking to our own planet with an explorer's eye like many did in the past. This particular article makes me wonder how many unexplained events that ended up in folk legend were the cause of some unique weather pattern or then-unexplained event which we better understand today. I personally saw something like this very recently. On a trip up north towards Vermont for some skiing I spotted that the moon was particularly large that one night. Later on as we were passing by Boston we saw what appeared to be a black line cutting straight through the moon. It extended to each end of the horizon and while it was a cloud, no others were in the sky, and it was so uniform throughout that it made me doubt my own common sense!

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Obama's Secret Weapon In South

Obama's Secret Weapon In South | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
States in the Deep South traditionally vote Republican in every presidential election. However, a string of "blue" counties curve through Mississippi, Alabama and Georgia.

 

Question to ponder: How does the physical geography of a region impact the human geography of a place?  Using this example, does the environment completely determine the cultural outcomes of the region?  To what extent does one impact the other?

 

Tags: physical, political, environment, unit 4 political.


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A Rio Runs Through It: Naming the American Stream

A Rio Runs Through It: Naming the American Stream | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Displayed is a map originally produced by Derek Watkins.  This map is a fantastic combination of physical and cultural geography.  While most flowing bodies of water will be called rivers or streams, the lesser used terms (brook, fork, bayou, run, arroyo, etc.) show a striking regionalization of toponym regions.  What do these patterns indicate?  Why are in those toponyms found in those particular places? 


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cookiesrgreat's comment, February 2, 2012 5:12 PM
This is one of my favorite maps. Combines geography, language and history
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:23 PM

unit 3

Devyn Hantgin's curator insight, March 23, 2015 9:27 PM

How to define regions and evaluate the regionalization process

This maps shows the different names to describe a river. The colors show regions based on what they call the body of water. Language is a great way to separate a population into regions.

This relates to our unit of study because we talk about regionalization and the different ways populations are divided into regions. When we look at the USA we tend to see patterns between the North and the South and the way they name things differently. 

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Physical Geography of Avatar

Physical Geography of Avatar | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

The site is in Chinese, but the images are spectacular.  They put a glass trail on the mountain Tyanmen (Heaven's Gate), located in Zhangjiajie National Forest Park in Hunan Province, China.
It is a mountain in this park inspired the famous film "Avatar," the idea of floating mountains of Pandora.  Below is a Google image search for "Zhangjiajie National Forest Park."  Prepare to be amazed.


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Namibian capital needs "water banks" for dry times

Namibian capital needs "water banks" for dry times | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Windhoek needs to start filling aquifers artificially to counter threat of running out of water, government officials say...

 

There are Human-Environmental interactions, growing populations with limited resources and physical geography teaching points here.  


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Landscapes: Volume II

This is an incredibly beautiful time-lapse HD video.  Breathtaking physical landscapes of the "Four Corners" region in the U.S. southwest (mainly Arizona and Utah) with a smattering of cultural landscapes interspersed.  For many students, seeing a beautiful landform piques their interest to then understand the geomorphological processes that made them.   


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, October 19, 2011 5:58 PM
ABSOLUTELY AMAZING!! These incredibly beautiful physical landscapes were gorgeous. With the help of the HD video it all felt so real and breath taking. While I was watching this video I was keeping in mind the thought of the geomorphological process but more importantly how I feel as though we take for granted to not see what else is out there in the country. I myself knew we live in a beautiful country but after watching this video I just grew much much more appreciation for the countries gorgeous landscapes. I also have saved this video because I believe it is so important to show to many others.
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Map of The World - Shaded Relief

Map of The World - Shaded Relief | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Interactive shaded relief map of the world.  Very cool and an excellent reference map with it's key functionality being that it works on a variety of scales on separate regions. 


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Manslaughter trial of L'Aquila earthquake scientists will cause serious aftershocks

Manslaughter trial of L'Aquila earthquake scientists will cause serious aftershocks | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
This week, a committee of six scientists (including Dr Enzo Boschi, formerly president of Italy’s National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology) and one government official, whose role was to advise…...

 

To what degree to we rely on science? This trial has the potential to set a very harmful precedent should scientist not be able to mitigate disasters...science itself appears to be on trial. 


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Rapid Landscape Change

Rapid Landscape Change | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
BOULDER, Colo. -- National Guard helicopters were able to survey parts of Highway 34 along the Big Thompson River Saturday. Here are some images of the destruction along the roadway.

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 26, 2013 9:29 AM

Looking at these photos reminded me of the video that we watched in class where water was rushing under a road and within minutes the road started to fall apart and eventually ended up completely divided in half. It is amazing how quickly the water can erode what is underneath and cause such damage to the road and area around it. Looking through the pictures it almost makes you nervous to drive on such a rode again because it all happens so quickly. It goes to show you just how powerful that water is to cause destruction like that. It is not easy to destroy a road like that. Again it goes back to the goegraphy. This type of thing doesn't just happen everywhere. Having a river like this presents the possibilities of something like this happening. Once is starts eroding it happens quick. A road that may look driveable one minute may be completely eroded 5 minutes later. It is amazing how a rush of water can cause such damage. Even if there are set systems to get the water through, sometimes the water rush is too powerful and breaks through and erodes the earth underneath anyway like we saw in the video in class. I have never seen anything like these picture before, and it really is amazing to see what can happen. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:59 PM

By looking at these pictures you can see that the water just completely ruined this road. The road sunk in and collapsed as well. Will this road ever be safe to drive on again if it gets fixed?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:24 PM
National helicopters caught these pictures along the Thompson river while the water rages next to a road. The destruction of the water and its erosion had deteriorated the road.
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What If?

What If? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This blogpost answers the (often unasked) question:  What would the world be like if the land masses were spread out the same way as now - only rotated by an angle of 90 degrees? While purely hypothetical, this is an exercise in applying real geographic thinking to different situations.  Anything that you would correct? 

 

Tags: weather climate, geography, GeographyEducation, unit 1 GeoPrinciples, physical. 


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Dania's comment, September 5, 2012 11:41 PM
well!!!
I'll tell you that it's why God created Mother Nature. maybe what we think is bad now in nature can be worse for the the Earth and human being... I think if the ground is moved 90 degree, many natural phenomena would happened in many regions of the Earth which would be harm to people, plants and animals that live in those regions. Plus, the population of poor nation would not be prepared for those climate changes.... many people would die or they have to move from those regions.
Jeff F's comment, September 6, 2012 12:50 AM
This looks like a map from the classic NES game Dragon Warrior II only flipped upside down. #nerd

Anyways, I think the most densely populated areas would be around the central ocean with New York and London being primate cities of their respected hemispheres.

Given that that the central ocean area is in an equatorial region, agriculture would likely not be very prosperous in these regions. Instead, I imagine New York becoming the center of an imperial superpower. Seeing as the most fertile regions of both South and North America are in temperate areas, agriculture would be a dominating industry.

The northern hemisphere on the other I hand I imagine would be largely undeveloped and rural. The "breadbaskets" of this hemispher are located much further inland from the central ocean.
Ian Roberts's comment, September 11, 2012 8:57 PM
First off I would like to say travel to Europe would be much easier and the Pacific Ocean grew even larger. One thing that really got me wondering was whether the world would be northern hemisphere centered or southern hemisphere centered. Currently, there are many more people in the northern hemisphere, so things like the summer olympics are held in our summer, their winter. BUt with the world turned ninety degrees, the population will be much more similar. The north will probably still have more people, but the south has America. It would be interesting to see how they would decide that conflict.
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Nat'l Geographic Video -- Hurricanes 101

Find out how hurricanes can be so destructive.

 

Not only will you learn about hurricanes but you can also watch videos about lighting, tornadoes, volcanoes, and overall everything about the weather. These are great videos to use in class when teaching units about natural disasters. These videos are full of great engaging facts.


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Carly Griffiths's curator insight, May 17, 2016 1:04 AM

I absolutely loved watching these videos. I believe they would be a fantastic resource to show students or for students to use for research when exploring natural disasters. This site provides multiple videos on multiple different disasters. Each video provides great information and facts including, causes, when and where they are most likely to happen, the amount of damage, different sizes and speed and past examples. Each video provides such great visuals and explanation for these natural disasters. Students would be able to gain deep knowledge and understandings to support their research and/or investigation. I am currently in the middle of creating a task for my students using digital technologies such as this and incorporating collaboration through Wikis and blog. I plan to use these videos to further my students knowledge and encourage further exploration on these videos for their research.

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Making a Topographic Profile

Demonstration on how to make a topographic profile for an Earth Science Lab.

 

This is an excellent way to teach elevation, landforms and cartography without high-tech tools.  Not a quick project, but very good for a class with a large physical geography component.   


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Skeptic’s own study finds climate change real, but we should be critical

Skeptic’s own study finds climate change real, but we should be critical | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON — A prominent physicist and skeptic of global warming spent two years trying to find out if mainstream climate scientists were wrong. In the end, he determined they were right: Temperatures really are rising rapidly.

 

Objective science is quite unifed...global temperatures are rising.  Arguing that point is simply unscientific and factually inaccurate.


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Timelapse of Iceland's Midnight Sun

BEST VIEWED IN HD AND FULLSCREEN (with scaling off) Midnight Sun: A natural phenomenon occurring in the summer months north of the Arctic Circle and south of the Antarctic Circle where the sun never fully sets and remains visible 24 hours a day.

 


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Gallery of Tombolos

Gallery of Tombolos | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Pictures of these rare sandbars that extend to a nearshore island.

 

Coastal physical geography produces beautiful landforms...these tombolos (some famous like Mont St. Michel) provide visual examples of numerous geomorphological processes. 


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Vintage Maps Trace the Meandering Mississippi

Vintage Maps Trace the Meandering Mississippi | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Excellent pieces of cartography...but they highlight the fact that things we think of as fixed and immovable (rivers, mountains, etc.) are a part of incredibly dynamic systems that change.  An analogy with cultural, economic and political situations could easily be made, showing that the only constant on Earth is change.


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