AP Human Geography Education
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Map Projections

Map Projections | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

A map projection is used to portray all or part of the round Earth on a flat surface. This cannot be done without some distortion.  Every projection has its own set of advantages and disadvantages. There is no "best" projection.  The mapmaker must select the one best suited to the needs, reducing distortion of the most important features.  Mapmakers and mathematicians have devised almost limitless ways to project the image of the globe onto paper. Scientists at the U. S. Geological Survey have designed projections for their specific needs—such as the Space Oblique Mercator, which allows mapping from satellites with little or no distortion.  This document gives the key properties, characteristics, and preferred uses of many historically important projections and of those frequently used by mapmakers today.


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Carlee Allen's curator insight, March 26, 2015 6:58 PM

This article explains and talks about 18 specific map projections. It gives a lot of detail about all of them, and describes the disadvantages and uses for all of them.

 

I thought that this was interesting because I learned more about map projections, and actually how people use them.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, March 27, 2015 2:05 AM

This is so useful for primary students

Christopher L. Story's curator insight, March 27, 2015 9:59 AM

Some review help

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Map Fight

Map Fight | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 11, 2014 3:02 PM

This simple WebApp allows the user to compare areas that are hard to compare on a map or globe because of distance or the map projection.  Competitive students love to hypothesize and then verify.  This helps strengthen student's mental maps and their ability to make regional comparisons. 


Tagsmapping K12, perspective, scale.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 20, 2014 12:40 PM

unit 1

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Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World

Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Elizabeth Borneman explores how cartography and cartographic projections help and hinder our perception of the world.

"How do you think the world (starting with our perceptions) could change if the map looked differently? What if Australia was on top and the hemispheres switched? By changing how we look at a map we truly can begin to explore and change our assumptions about the world we live in."

 

Geography doesn’t just teach us about the Earth; it provides ways for thinking about the Earth that shapes how we see the world.  Maps do the same; they represent a version of reality and that influences how we think about places. 

 

Tags: mapping, perspective.


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Mrs. B's curator insight, September 22, 2014 7:02 AM

Unit 1 !!!!

 

samantha benitez's curator insight, November 22, 2014 2:53 PM

helps show the different perspectives of our world and how it has changed. also shows many different forms of mapping our world throughout time.

Emily Coats's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:34 AM

UNIT 1 

This article discusses map projections and how they shape our perception of the world. Maps influence how we see the world, and could change the way we see it as well. These projections show us many different views of the Earth, which is very influential to our perspectives. This applies to unit 1 and its major concepts and underlying geographical perspective such as analyzing maps. 

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Geography in the News: Eurasia’s Boundaries

Geography in the News: Eurasia’s Boundaries | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Europe and Asia, while often considered two separate continents, both lie on the same landmass or tectonic plate, the Eurasian supercontinent. The historic and geographic story of the Eurasian boundary is intriguing."


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Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 2:26 PM

If Europe and Asia are not different continents based on the tectonic plates that they both share, would that mean that Russia is in a fact a part of Europe. Wouldn't its ties be closely link to that of Asia, because growing up in school, I was taught that Russia was closely related to the Asian continent than it was to Europe. Though Russia is sometimes perceived as being its own continent, I wonder what this discovery will mean for them long term.

David Lizotte's curator insight, February 20, 2015 1:32 PM

The article states that the idea of separate continents comes from European scholars whom wanted to give more definition to there culture and area of the world, essentially there region. I wonder if this could be said in regards to the inhabitant East of the Ural Mountains. Did they want a form of boundary to represent and distinguish there region? None the less, we live in the west so the western perspective is what guides us. 

Even if there never was a Europe and an Asia, there would still be land disputes as to whom has claim to which region/area of land. On a global perspective its viewed as Europe and Asia but when one takes a closer look its simply country and country... not continent and continent. This article is revealing the importance of Eurasia, how it truly does exist. A quasi boundary is not going to separate the once "two continents" rather nothing separates the continents, its all part of Eurasia. 

A neat part of the article is how the writer states recognizing the land mass as two continents is old and out of date. Its basically wrong and non-intelligent. I believe this is important and is something that needs to be recognized on a national scale (here in the United States). Personally I've always recognized the realm as "Eurasia." I now feel more intelligent for doing so! How do people in Europe and with this being said Asia, feel about this more reformed definition of the supercontinent? Do they even recognize it as true? Perhaps they realize there are more important issues at hand like current  countries  disputed and invaded borders.

None the less there is disputed boundaries on a more micro level, when compared to the continent versus continent scheme. For example Russian backed separatists have claimed a portion of Eastern Ukraine. Do people actually see this as Asians expanding into Europe or rather a transcontinental country (Russia) expanding itself more westward. The importance here lies in the disputed country boundaries, not continental boundaries, yet one cannot not deny the significance of the  "continental boundary" which some people do believe in. But the core of the matter is the country to country ratio. 

 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 9, 2015 2:25 PM

This was interesting to read because I don't associate the two till I can visually see it.  Then to further call it Eurasia makes sense as well.  There is a population that are considered Asian Russians.  I did a study on this culture and I couldn't believe there were Asian Russians. This sounds crazy.  It would make sense for cross cultures in this region.  

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Countries that are most and least welcoming to foreigners

Countries that are most and least welcoming to foreigners | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Blue countries are more welcoming, red countries less. Where does yours rank?

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Thomas D's comment, May 6, 2013 10:29 AM
I think this map of least and most welcoming countries to tourist is very interesting. I look at this through the American point of view and see that countries like Russia, Iran and Pakistan who are among the least welcoming states. These are all countries that we have had conflicts with throughout our countries history. I also find it interesting that the United States is such a neutral country towards tourism. A country that was based off of immigrants is no longer so welcoming to outsiders coming to our country. This could be due to the recent terrorist acts that have taken place within the United States in the past 15 years. Also just by looking at the map in a broader sense most of the countries that are unwelcoming are located in western Europe and Asia rather than anywhere else in the world.
Paul Beavers's comment, July 4, 2013 7:35 PM
Well the Chinese sure hide it well. I've visited there twice (once for a month) and I couldn't have been more welcomed. The people were the best part of both visits.
Bryan Chung's curator insight, May 8, 2014 7:42 PM

cool

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20 Classrooms From Around The World

20 Classrooms From Around The World | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

We are all different...we are all the same.   This is a set set of images that highlights the essential similarities in people across cultures.

 


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Nick Lesley's comment, May 27, 2014 3:42 PM
i thought this was very cool and interesting to see different classes all around the world and how their culture is i would really like to see a video on the classes to see how they learn...cool article and good pictures
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The Scale of the Universe

The Scale of the Universe | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Zoom from the edge of the universe to the quantum foam of spacetime and learn about everything in between.

 

Click "Start," and then use the slider across the bottom, or the wheel on your mouse, to zoom in -- and in and in and in... or out and out and out... It will take you from the very smallest features postulated by scientists (the strings in string theory) to the very largest (the observable universe). This really is a fabulous visual demonstration of scale at micro and macro levels. This is an excellent way to bring spatial thinking into the math curriculum as well.

 

Tags: Scale, perspective, space, spatial, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples.


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Mark V's comment, September 10, 2012 2:38 PM
I felt that this is an excellent way to understand spatial thinking which is important in many areas beyond geography.
Joe Andrade's curator insight, July 7, 2013 10:08 PM

This is a great method of teaching some of the principals behind understanding spatial analysis. An important skill in understanding the world we live in.

Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 9, 2013 7:50 AM

Click "Start," and then use the slider across the bottom, or the wheel on your mouse, to zoom in -- and in and in and in... or out and out and out... It will take you from the very smallest features postulated by scientists (the strings in string theory) to the very largest (the observable universe). This really is a fabulous visual demonstration of scale at micro and macro levels. This is an excellent way to bring spatial thinking into the math curriculum as well.


Tags: Scale, perspective, space, spatial, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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Amazing view of Universe captured

Amazing view of Universe captured | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Hubble Space Telescope has produced one of its most extraordinary views of the Universe to date.

 

The Earth is an amazing place to study...but this makes it feel remarkably small. 

 

Tags: geospatial, space, remote sensing, scale, perspective. 


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Matt Mallinson's comment, October 1, 2012 11:32 AM
I like this kind of stuff, if i didn't choose geography I would probably have chosen astronomy. Everything about it interests me, there's so much that we don't know and will probably never know.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, September 10, 2013 11:07 AM

I thought it was funny that even though many of the published telescopically captured photos are composites of different lens and filtered shots of a single item, or area of space, that if that item or area were really to be examined, to get more of a feel for the universe as it truly is rather than how we would ordinarily see it, would be to consider it from an infinite number of perspectives.  Rather than just one perspective, as humans are limited to, the universe has many eyes.  Instead of taking many photographs from the same perspective, we could, as many modern scientists do, do in-depth scans using X-ray technology, and magnetic resonance, assessing composition, to create a full picture of all angles, zooms, and subjects of everything, in order to determine more about origins and mysteries of the universe. I would endorse that to be done on an infinite scale, complete with documentation of all spatial anomallies and occurances, such that completion of understanding could, in theory take place by crossing the gap of the notion of infinity by utilizing technology to one's advantage.  This would allow us not to waste time looking at every detail, but to have something with more processing capabilities understand it for us, and communicate that infinity in a way that we could see it.  There are dangers of using X-ray technology, and it doesn't seem like NASA really cares about (as one could hope) not harming alien life, or planting life on other worlds, etc. I would more forcibly endorse that we do not try to observe other worlds and the Universe at all, because god forbid, some alien colony finds us and sees that we are not only cuturally divided, we are a torn world, shattered in the aftermath of the destruction that comes from our selfishness and pride that has long dominated the hearts of men.  They might be disappointed, and they should be.

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TED Talk: The danger of a single story

http://www.ted.com Our lives, our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories. Novelist Chimamanda Adichie tells the story of how she found her authen...

 

To gain a global perspective inherently requires understanding multiple perspectives.  Africa is frequently portrayed as 'the other' but also homogenized within a single narrative that 'flattens' truth.  How do we teach about other places that develop geographic empathy and show the many stories of places?  


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Body Ritual of the Nacirema

Body Ritual of the Nacirema | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Written by Harold Miner, the Body Ritual of the Nacirema was written in part to parallel an early 20th century cultural anthropology report on a culture this can be used to discuss culture and different perspectives of culture groups.  This could be very fun, especially waiting to see when the "aha" moment comes and they understand just who the Nacirema are (the SPOILER will be embedded in the comment section).  It is lengthy and written as academic paper, so for K-12 use, I'd recommend using snippets and having them work in groups to analyze the seemingly bizarre cultural rituals of the Nacirema.  


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Seth Dixon's comment, November 11, 2011 2:17 PM
**SPOILER ALERT** The NACERIMA are is modern American society (American spelled backwards). This little bit of information drastically changes the reading.
Seth Dixon's comment, November 14, 2011 4:05 PM
The "Nacirema" are "American" spelled backwards (or interpreted backwards).
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Everyone Is 'Middle Class,' Right?

Everyone Is 'Middle Class,' Right? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
A new study finds that ignorance of one's relative standing in the income distribution is not unique to Americans, and looks at the policy consequences of such misperceptions.

 

The terms high-class and low-class have such strong negative connotations that everyone seeks to be perceived as middle class.  What income bracket are you in?  The research says it'll probably be a surprise.  Data for income bracket is the USA: http://taxpolicycenter.org/numbers/displayatab.cfm?DocID=2879


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, October 17, 2011 10:59 PM
I do not believe everyone is considered to be middle class. I think that is a false statement. I truly believe in the phrase "rich get richer, poor get poorer" I consider myself and my family working middle class. Our income isn't incredibly high but it is average. We have money for food, clothing, bill paying and essentials but also have the extra to travel, and spoil ourselves. That is where the difference lies between middle, low, and high class incomes. The lower class may only make money to support their selves and family with food. As for the high class they have money to do anything they want. Pay bills, buy the essentials. Although they get to have dinner out every night, buy the fancy cars and clothes. The low class may live a stressful like as the high class live a glorious life.
Seth Dixon's comment, October 17, 2011 11:14 PM
Everyone most definitely is not a part of the middle class and Catherine Rampell of the NY Times does not believe that (as I interpret her) but is using that hyperbolic statement to make the point that more people SELF IDENTIFY with the middle class than can actually be there. I think she agrees with your "rich get richer" since her main point is that this self-identification with the middle class obscures the rising social inequity in America. I agree too. Thanks for your comments!
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The truth and it's opposite: Japanese Addresses

How Japanese addresses work, and other opposites, by Derek Sivers - http://sivers.org...

 

What is true is often dependent on your perspective, the context and is situated within a particular paradigm.  This is a mind-blowing video because it exposed our framework (which might go unquestioned as universal) to be but one of many ways in which to organize the world and the information within it.  

 

Those of you who are stymied by a school's filter and feel you can't use YouTube in the classroom, try YouTube Downloader: http://youtubedownload.altervista.org/ ;


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Alex Smiga's curator insight, October 4, 2015 11:30 AM

Nice little eye opener for when you think you know anything for certain

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The True Size Of Africa

The True Size Of Africa | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is another old classic image that I might have shared earlier but it merits repeating. As Salvatore Natoli (a leader in geography education) once said, "In our society we unconsciously equate size with importance and even power." This is one reason why many people have underestimated the true size of Africa relative to places that they view as more important or more powerful.


Tags: mapping, Africa, perspective, images. 


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Afrikasources's curator insight, January 15, 2014 10:10 AM

Just a reminder

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 11:01 AM

It is incredible big, but unfortunately most of the north area is cover by the big Sahara and most of the are is typically unfertilized. 

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 9, 2015 4:29 PM

As we can see, there's a little overlapping here and some empty spots but it's pretty accurate. The United States and China are in the top 5 largest countries of the world list and they still fit in the 2nd largest continent of the world, Africa. I'd like to see the size comparison between Africa and Russia. I did some research on that and it turns out that Russia is a little over half the size of Africa, maybe the size of the combination of the United States and China.

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The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place

The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
How alarmist, racist coverage of Ebola makes things worse. A dressing down of the latest #NewsweekFail.

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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 9, 2015 2:21 PM

Before I even read the article, my first thought went to the Linneaus classification.  That really damaged history with this one chart.  I think people still think of Africans and blacks(very dark blacks) as dirty or unintelligent.  Which is horrible and couldn't be further from the truth.  Misinforming the public is criminal.  News media and social media need to be careful and educate properly.  I've been asked from a customs offical, "Have you been to Africa in the past 6 months?"  Which is a very blanket question because Africa is a continent.  There were areas that were not hit with Ebola.  

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 27, 2015 4:37 PM

Those who deny the continued influence of racism in our society are blinding themselves to the truth. Contemporary influences of the racism that plagued the preceding centuries are still found in most major media depictions of Africa. The Ebola epidemic has served to highlight the bigotry that plagues Western media, as the assumption that all of Africa is diseased and dirty is continuously perpetuated (when, in reality, Ebola only affected a very small part of the continent). Africa is presented as "other," a backwards continent that is in desperate need of Western help and guidance- in what was is that different from the European colonizers who also viewed their actions as benevolent attempts to "civilize" the uncivilized? That mindset has not left Western circles, and yet we continue to pat ourselves on the back and congratulate ourselves for suddenly being so tolerant. The insensitivity of Western audiences to the concerns of black individuals both at home and in Africa related to the prevalence of racism highlights how determined mainstream media is to deny the existence of a problem. Until we recognize the Eurocentrism that continues to plague our media and make the necessary moves to correct the practice, harmful depictions of Africa will continue to loom large in Western media and in the opinions of many Europeans and Americans alike.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 30, 2015 7:12 AM

Africa has long been treated by the western media as a dark , brutish, uncivilized place. Africa is a place were people starve and murder each other in large numbers. There is so much more to Africa than the picture I just described. The problem is, many people just do not accept the existence of a culturally complex Africa. That narrative would destroy the traditional  darker narrative of the past 500 years. A narrative grounded in the beliefs that blacks are inherently inferior beings. During the Ebola crises, the calls to cut off travel to Africa were quick and demanding. Had the crises been in England, would those same calls have been so loud? I think we all can guess the answer  to that question. Much progress has been made, but we still need to change our cultural depiction of Africa.

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Why The U.S. Chills Its Eggs And Most Of The World Doesn't

Why The U.S. Chills Its Eggs And Most Of The World Doesn't | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
In many countries, eggs aren't refrigerated and they're still considered safe to eat. But in the U.S., we have to chill them, because we've washed away the cuticle that protects them from bacteria.

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aitouaddaC's comment, September 22, 2014 5:16 PM
Amazing !
Gareth Jukes's curator insight, March 24, 2015 10:38 PM

Variations of major zones and effects of markets-

 

This article describes why the U.S is one of the few countries that actually refrigerates their eggs. This is beacuse we had washed away the cuticle that protects eggs from bacteria. In other countries, they just leave eggs like how they were laid.

 

This article contributes to the idea of variations of markets by explaining how our country is one different from most of others by eggs. It also explains why we are one of the few that must chill the eggs, unlike other markets and/or venders.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:44 PM

For many Americans that are traveling abroad for the first time, realizing that eggs aren't in the refrigerator is a bit of a culture shock (not to mention the moment they find milk in a box that also isn't being refrigerated).  Agricultural practices dictate storage requirements and some things we might have imagined were universal are actually place-specific or peculiar to our cultural setting.  What we are taught to think of as gross, appropriate, attractive or even sanitary is often steeped in a cultural context.  So is it strange the we refrigerate our eggs in the United States, or that they don't in other places? 

 

Tags: food production, technology, industry, food, agriculture, perspective.

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The World Religions Tree

The World Religions Tree | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Dynamic infographic on world religions (don't be intimidated by the page being in Russian... The graphic is not).


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Abby Laybourn's curator insight, December 10, 2014 1:25 PM

Although this was kind of hard to read it was interesting to see how different religions are related and where they stem from. 

Marita Viitanen's curator insight, January 31, 2015 6:48 PM

Tämä puu jotakuinkin hämmentää...

Emma Conde's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:16 PM

Unit 1 Geography: Its nature and perspectives

Although the article relating to this diagram is in Russian, the diagram is not, and I found it to be a very interesting visual to not only show world religions developing on a time scale, but also because it does a very good job of showing just how many little divisions of each religion they are, and how they are all intertwined. Zooming in on the diagram, you are able to see each divide, each new branch, and each date for hundreds of sets of information.

 

This illustrates the theme of identification of major world religions because it simply shows the mass amounts of tiny divisions that occur in the major world religions in a simple format. This is very helpful because this would be pages of writing if you tried to write it all out. 

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10 of the Most Dangerous Journeys to Schools Around the World

10 of the Most Dangerous Journeys to Schools Around the World | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Many of us have heard the stories of how our parents or grandparents had to walk miles in the snow to get to school. Perhaps some of these tales were a tad embellished, but we got the point. A lot of American kids have the luxury of being driven in a warm car or bus to a good school nearby. This is not the case for the children in this gallery.

The photos you are about to see are snapshots of the treacherous trips kids around the world take each day to get an education. Considering there are currently 61 million children worldwide who are not receiving an education—the majority of which are girls—these walks are seen as being well worth the risk.

In the above photo, students in Indonesia hold tight while crossing a collapsed bridge to get to school in Banten village on January 19, 2012.Flooding from the Ciberang river broke a pillar supporting the suspension bridge, which was built in 2001."


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Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, September 11, 2013 2:52 PM

It is sad what so many children must endure and go through in order to get an education.  I wonder if these bridges and structures have been fixed.  61 million children not receiving an education is 61 million too many.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 1, 2014 2:45 PM

unit 6 economic development

Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 13, 2015 2:55 PM

This is really hard to see. Children shouldn't have a hard journey getting to school to get an education and better their lives. These photos are from ten places around the world with the most dangerous journeys to school. This isn't a topic that even comes to mind because many of us living in the United States have had the luxury of being driven to school or riding a bus and we take that simple drive for granted. One of the photos is from Indonesia where students have to cross a collapsing bridge to get to school. The image shows them hanging on for dear life while trying not to fall in the water underneath them. There was a flood that broke the pillar holding this bridge up and it was never fixed after that. What happens when that bridge fully collapses? There needs to be a better way to get these kids to school. These children shouldn't have to suffer with getting their education for situations that are out of their control. 

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19 Maps That Will Help You Put The United States In Perspective

19 Maps That Will Help You Put The United States In Perspective | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

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Mary Patrick Schoettinger's curator insight, March 18, 2013 10:30 AM

Great map tools for kids and adults to get a better understanding of relative size of US vs the world.

Heather Ramsey's curator insight, March 18, 2013 2:05 PM

This site has lots of great examples of size comparisons between the United States and other coutnries/continents around the world. Which one is the most surprising to you? Why do you think you had a different idea of the size of the place that surprised you?

Ursula Sola de Hinestrosa's curator insight, March 18, 2013 9:13 PM

A punta de TIC el mundo se achicó !

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It’s a Small (and Cartographically Incorrect) World After All!

It’s a Small (and Cartographically Incorrect) World After All! | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Ever since my first visit to to Disneyland, I was intrigued by the  the ride 'It's a Small World After All."  As a youngster, it was an opportunity to get in cool boat ride that I always regretted half way into the ride once the song was firmly chiseled into my mind.  This blog post explores the curious and fascinating geographical imaginations, the visions of folk cultures and global harmony behind this Disneyland ride.  This fabulous map charts that vision. 


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melissa stjean's comment, September 4, 2012 12:20 PM
"It's a small world" is what thousands if not millions of kids hear on this ride a year. They are driven through the continents and are greated by happy faces of the natives to that land. The ride is somewhat dumbed down for kids, showing them what "its really like" in these countries, but the truth is most of the these countries are not clean, and happy as Disney makes them out to be. Though the ride is a good step to open kids minds about the world, but when they grow up they realize that its not that small, happy world afterall.
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The True Size Of Africa

The True Size Of Africa | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is another old classic image that I might have shared earlier but it merits repeating. As Salvatore Natoli (a leader in geography education) once said, "In our society we unconsciously equate size with importance and even power." This is one reason why many people have underestimated the true size of Africa relative to places that they view as more important or more powerful.


Tags: mapping, Africa, perspective, images. 


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Afrikasources's curator insight, January 15, 2014 10:10 AM

Just a reminder

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 11:01 AM

It is incredible big, but unfortunately most of the north area is cover by the big Sahara and most of the are is typically unfertilized. 

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 9, 2015 4:29 PM

As we can see, there's a little overlapping here and some empty spots but it's pretty accurate. The United States and China are in the top 5 largest countries of the world list and they still fit in the 2nd largest continent of the world, Africa. I'd like to see the size comparison between Africa and Russia. I did some research on that and it turns out that Russia is a little over half the size of Africa, maybe the size of the combination of the United States and China.

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Sorting the Real Sandy Photos From the Fakes

Sorting the Real Sandy Photos From the Fakes | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
A pictorial investigation bureau, at your service.

 

Social media has fundamentally changed how information is disseminated.  Many photos that are spread on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest can be 'doctored' or mislabeled since citizen journalists aren't held to the same standard of verifying their sources.  In the abundance of information, sorting out fact from fiction can be quite difficult.  Social media has made me a more of a skeptic, and I try not to post a picture that I it can't find it's original source.     


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The Geography of College Football Fans

The Geography of College Football Fans | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The possible realignment of college football conferences raises a host of interesting questions about fan loyalty.

 

As the regular season ends, SEC country (the Deep South) feels vindicated while the Midwest feels underappreciated.  Why is college sports more regionalized in fan bases?  How is realignment reshaping these geographies? 


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The Human Head as a Mercator Projection

The Human Head as a Mercator Projection | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Such an ordinary object, yet so disturbingly presented…...

 

While we accept spatial distortion as a given in geographic projections, it is striking how much it alters reality when the same distortion in applied to the human head...worth showing when discussion mapping and projections. 


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, September 10, 2012 11:45 AM
I thought this was a good visual to demonstrate how you cannot just take a global map and just flatten it. You do not get the same scale and accurate description of the globe. While it may show multiple of the land features, the land features get distorted.
Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 10, 2012 11:46 AM
Seeing a human face spread out this way makes me now realize that a 2-D map is not a real interpretation of the world. But at the same time this is more of a strange picture than when a globe is flattened out. I guess we are more used to seeing a globe flattened out.
Mr Ortloff's curator insight, July 23, 2013 3:38 PM

Map distortion.......

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Perspectives: Reconsider Columbus Day

Reconsider Columbus Day Presented by Nu Heightz Cinema rethink columbus day reconsider christopher columbus anti columbus day...

 

Without need to adopt one particular ideological perspective, this can be used to discuss distinct cultural perspectives and show how we frame geographic and historic information in our own context.


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SportsNation: Polls - ESPN

SportsNation: Polls - ESPN | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
SportsNation is the place for sports fans to express their opinions and interact with ESPN.

 

Strange, but let me explain.  The polls on ESPN (e.g.-"What conference should Texas go to?"  Map from summer 2010) display maps to show the voting patterns.  Not surprising to geographers, there are oftentimes strong regional biases.  Creating an activity to incorporate sports into geographic analysis can sometimes grab the attention of reluctant students.  Teaching in Rhode Island, I like to show several maps that show strong New England bias against the national consensus. 


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