AP Human Geography Education
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Crack Shack or Mansion?

Crack Shack or Mansion? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Can you tell a Vancouver mansion from a crack shack?

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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 4:31 PM


In this world any house can be held as a drug location. in the neighbor I live there was a house that broken into by the cops in which they found hundreds of pounds of drugs and none of the neighbors knew. We thought it was an abandoned home. a crack shack or mansion it is difficult to determine if it is or not.

Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 10:58 AM

This I found to be very interesting. To me it was very sterotypical and much harder than I thought it would be. I figured it would be easy to depict a Mansion from a Crack Shack, but I guess I was wrong. Different areas different lifestyles.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 25, 2014 9:55 AM

A fairly funny game that makes fun of the astronomical real estate prices in Vancouver, BC. I actually wasn't incredibly surprised as I've watched some HGTV. Since many of the shows are Canadian imports the extremely high priced homes in Vancouver and Toronto are often featured.

 

I guessed 10/16. The game should branch out to Toronto, we might've caught a glimpse of Rob Ford.

 

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Twitter Languages in London

Twitter Languages in London | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This map is a fantastic geovisualization that maps the spatial patterns of languages used on the social media platform Twitter.  This map was in part inspired by a Twitter map of Europe.  While most cities would be expected to be linguistically homogenous, but London's cosmopolitan nature and large pockets of immigrants influence the distribution greatly.

   

Tags: social media, language, neighborhood, visualization, cartography.


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Betty Denise's comment, November 7, 2012 1:13 PM
Thank you – again – for your tremendous partnership
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
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NYTimes Video: Transforming Gulou

NYTimes Video: Transforming Gulou | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
A government-initiated redevelopment plan will transform one of the oldest neighborhoods in Beijing into a polished tourist attraction.

 

This 2010 video showcases one of China's urban transformation projects.  Urban revitalization plans are not without critics, especially those who see the cultural transformation of a neighborhood they deem worthy of historical preservation. 


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Albert Jordan's curator insight, April 17, 2014 1:20 PM

Progression or destruction? Out with the old and in with the new or the selling of ones soul? Of course those that are affected or disagree will say one thing and those that wish to develop will say another. While many will see this as a desecration of the past; at some point at a larger scale change must come. It is important to realize that China needs to do something with its people, whom are only multiplying. Much of the old towns and structures are not up to modern day standards of safety. As more people need to support themselves and their dependents, they will need jobs. The main, larger cities, can only support so much. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 1:57 PM

Is this not gentrification in China. Old neighborhoods being transformed to suit more profitable ventures. Makes you wonder what will happen to the people who live in Gulou if tourism comes to the area. Furthermore, the identity of Gulou is at risk, if China is to develop old historical areas, I think it would be best to do so in a way that works with in the framework of the existing local culture and preserves the history of the area.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:43 PM

Stories such as this are incredibly sad but also rather controversial, On one side of the issue the Chinese Government wishes to modernize its nation to be able to compete with the other global powers and to do so they seek to rebuild many of its old cities, The other side of the issue is that these cities marked to be destroyed and rebuilt have vast historical significance to both China and the whole region. It seems short sighted of China to destroy their past looking only to the future. 

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Decoding Bangkok’s Pocket-Urbanization: Social Housing Issues + Community Architects

Decoding Bangkok’s Pocket-Urbanization: Social Housing Issues + Community Architects | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is modern cosmopolitan Bangkok, the second most expensive Southeast Asian city after Singapore.  Along with explosive city growth, the demand for urban housing has increased substantially. Due to a lack of sufficient and affordable housing, communities have settled into the cracks, eliciting a diagnosed social and institutional ‘pocket-urbanism’ that forms barriers of interaction among communities, and certainly between communities and authority figures...


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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 5:45 PM

The poor of Bangkok have been settling their communities in the cracks of wealthier areas, creating a phenomenom of "pocket-urbanization." The artical talks about an emerging "ethical turn" in architecture. People will certainly enjoy their lives better when they are empowered in their own living situations, but also we have seen how poor infrastructure is a target for the worst of natural disasters. Rebuilding these areas would be good for many parties.

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WSJ Census Map Maker

WSJ Census Map Maker | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Draw your own district...

 

An easy way to have students work on a neighborhood projects and still get them to have a cartographic component to the project.  A Facebook or Twitter account is needed to login (but that isn't to difficult to manage in most classroom settings). 


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Gentrification spelled out

Gentrification spelled out | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
As upscale, high-rise condos and hipster bars opened nearby, longtime customers joked: Is this really still “the ’hood”? Not anymore.

 

In a gentrifying neighborhood in Washington D.C. that was historically African-American, Fish in the ’Hood was an iconic restaurant that captured the feel of the area.  Just this May, the storefront restaurant was renamed Fish in the Neighborhood.

Questions to Ponder: Why?  Does it matter?  What does it mean?


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, September 25, 2014 5:35 PM

Gentrification deals with the forcing out of lower income residents and making space available for the more affluent. The re-naming of Fish in the 'Hood shows how gentrification forces the culture  of entire communities to change. Although this restaurant was popular before, they were forced to re-brand so they can stay in business. Gentrification exiles the poor, with that their culture. This restaurant shows that, as more upscale business open up to service the needs of more affluent citizens, any business that has the perception of being the contrary will soon be out of business. This matters because it shows how gentrification destroys communities image, and culture for the sake of increasing revenue and real estate value. What is exhibit here is not only a socio-economic shift but also a racial shift as well. This neighborhood was predominately African American before it began to gentrify, "The 'Hood" is a saying that correlates with African American culture. This restaurant's re-branding shows that they no longer can continue to bring in customers with a name that is part of the African American vernacular. Furthermore, it shows the racial trends that go with gentrification where minority culture is pushed out as more money flows in.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 25, 2015 11:15 AM

The article talks about a restaurant called Fish In The NeighborHood, with emphasis on Hood, that has not been affected by the gentrification that has happened in the area. He still refers to the area as "Hood" even with all the newly built building. The article also describes the process of the gentrification, and people's opinions on the name of the restaurant compared to the area.

 

This article relates to Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use because it explains the idea and process of gentrification. It gives an example of how some buildings are unaffected by the gentrified area. 

Savannah Rains's curator insight, May 27, 2015 2:50 AM

this article is taking the time to plainly spell out what gentrification is and where it is happening. Gentrification means the taking of lowe class land and making it more valuable to try and boost the overall way of life in that area. Most people are blind to this system and should take the time to learn about it. 

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The next small thing: How sustainable neighborhoods could reshape cities

The next small thing: How sustainable neighborhoods could reshape cities | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Residents and planners around the country are dreaming up innovative ways to create eco-friendly, self-reliant communities. But turning ideas into reality is a tall order.

 

Urban revitalization projects gentrification have been an important part of the American scene since the 1990s.  As we reconsider the city, and some of the associated issues with dense living, many are also thinking about the environmental impact of urban life and rethinking how to make neighborhoods more sustainable.  This article uses the Denver Lower Downtown (LoDo) neighborhood as its case study for analyzing sustainability with the city.  


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Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, November 19, 2013 3:11 PM

Here we have the perfect example of the positive effects associated with gentrification. Unused and weathering space being revitalized and re-purposed for the benefit of local economy and communitites. Not only that but the intention of these projects is to also operate in an ecologically sustainable manner by using as little resources as possible. The occupation of mill space is something that's even been seen here in Providence, most notably the hope artiste building in Pawtucket on the Providence line.

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 5:38 PM

I have totally thought about this before, and a family that I know just spent the past several months remodeling their house to be more 'green.'  I think that in addition to energy, neighborhoods could have community grow-ops, where they grow all the necessary crops to sustain their area- fruits, vegetables, grains, cotton, etc. and I think that the communities would be cleaner, greener, and brought more together if they had the opportunity to work every day to provide for themselves and their community.  I miss out on a lot of enjoyment in life because I have to do things like school.  Other people miss out because they have work, or other obligations.  I think that if people farmed as communities, it would be economically, environmentally, and socially proficuous, as well as eliminating a need for capitalistic trade with other regions, where people might get cheated.  I have so many ideas of Utopia that I have gotten from reading and philosophizing with friends and acquaintences, but there really are so few people that have the ability to implement anything on a large scale, that I am often frustrated with these concepts of 'betterment.'  It really is sad that people are taught so much these days, because their brains are full of garbage, rather than new possibilities.  It would be really interesting to have an experimental colony where these ideas of sustainability could be tried out, but I think that will happen long after my generation has died.

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A Fight to Save One of Latin America's Oldest Neighborhoods

A Fight to Save One of Latin America's Oldest Neighborhoods | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
In Panama City, a plan to build a marine viaduct around a colonial-era neighborhood has residents up in arms...

 

Urban preservation, the historical geography of communities and the cultural character of the urban environment are themes that are deeply embedded in this quick yet potent article by geographer, Thomas Sigler. 


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Paige Therien's curator insight, February 12, 2014 11:34 PM

This is an issue that citizens and governments struggle with all around the world.  Spots like this one, which is "the oldest continuously inhabited European settlement on the Pacific coast of the Americas", are treasured by residents, citizens, and tourists alike.  But when does a historical area need to adapt to growing populations (and therefore increasingly congested streets)?  Or should they at all?  Projects like these take a lot of time, effort, and money to complete.  When visual reminders of local history are taken away, it risks the chance of the knowledge of  the history being lost as well.  The funny thing is, this development is felt to be necessary in order to better accommodate large influxes of tourists which are attracted to this historical site, which if the development takes place, may ruin the charm of the neighborhood; it is a viscous cycle.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 29, 2014 2:23 PM

The preservation of this neighborhood is important for one's sense of place.  The marine viaduct would take away for the history that is embedded in Panama City. While a viaduct would be incredibly useful and profitable, i understand why residents would be concerned.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 10:23 PM

Just from looking at this picture, this doesn't really look like a bad neighborhood to live in, despite it being one of the oldest in Latin America. They wish to turn the old neighborhood into a highway with six lands of traffic. The neighborhood was founded back in 1673 by the Spanish Crown. It is described as a charming colonial-era World Heritage Site and as previously stated, the oldest European settlement on the Pacific coast. The cobblestone streets, Spanish colonial architecture and majestic plazas have earned a considerable amount of international acclaim in the past 10 years, attracting tourists. Back and forth the debate goes about whether or not to demolish this neighborhood. A neighborhood resident and real estate agent has been fighting against the project. She got a group together and so far they have been successful at protesting and even meeting with the President to voice their opinion. At the moment, it is unclear at what the outcome will be.

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Urban Density and Design

http://www.ted.com How can cities help save the future? Alex Steffen shows some cool neighborhood-based green projects that expand our access to things we wa...

 

Urban density and design connected with energy usage and climate change. 


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Samantha Fuller's curator insight, September 27, 2013 1:44 PM

We think that the climate change has to do with using fossil fuels. And althogh creating a clean sourse of energy is a good plan it doesn't solve everything. Soon we will not be able to create enough energy for everyone who uses it.