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Agricultural Models

Agricultural Models | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 2, 2013 9:27 PM

Models in geography, even if they are at times limited in their explanatory power, are excellent pedagogical tools to promote students to think spatially. 

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, October 3, 2013 4:23 PM

We will be studying this model in Chapter 10 HUGGERS

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UN projects Kenya to grow older and healthier

UN projects Kenya to grow older and healthier | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

The UN projects Kenya to grow older and healthier
Summary:

The number of infant deaths per 1,000 live births currently totals 51.6, and is expected to drop sharply to 12.1 by the end of the century.The country will also grow steadily older, with the current median age of 18 expected to more than double -- to 37 years of age -- by 2100.A Kenyan born this year can expect to live for 61.6 years.The nation's population will reach 160 million by the start of the next century, according to the new outlook.
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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 4:59 PM

The UN projects that Kenyans will grow older and healthier. Infant deaths will decrease and age expectancy will increase. What will Kenyans have to do to be healthier? Lifestyle changes?

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 1:49 PM

This article provides statistics for the population growth of Kenya and other African nations in relation to the rest of the world. Africa features some of the world's highest birthrates and the world's youngest population. In Kenya, improving healthcare will see the life expectancy rise significantly due to less infant death while the population will become older as birthrates begin to decline, as they tend to do as a nation develops, but not before Kenya becomes one of the more populous nations in the world.

 

Kenya's growing population and increasing median age could mean good things for its economic prospects. Population growth along with maturation means there is a large and capable workforce available, but Kenya must have the resources and abilities to create jobs for its burgeoning population or face widespread poverty.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 4:01 PM

As the years go on, the world is learning how to live longer. With new medicinal practices and people supplying clean water and food to third world countries, there is definitely room for Kenya to grow old with the U.S. and other countries that have higher life expectancies.

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Thomas Malthus and Population Growth

Learn more: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=r1ywppAJ1xs Thomas Malthus's views on population. Malthusian limits.

 

This is a succinct (but not perfect) summary of Malthusian ideas on population.  What do you think of his ideas?  Any specific parts of his theory that you agree with?  Do you disagree with some of his ideas?  What did history have to say about it?  

 

Tags: Demographics, population, models, APHG,  unit 2 population. 


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Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 7:12 PM

This video very well explains the malthusian theory and how it is associated with population

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 7:56 PM

Unit 2

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 21, 11:27 PM

 

unit 2

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Why cities should dismantle highways

Why cities should dismantle highways | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
At TEDxPhilly, Next American City editor at large Diana Lind explains why cities should rethink their highway infrastructure.

 

For generations, the prominent model of urbanism accepted in the U.S. has placed the automobile as the top priority for public places, placing massive highways right in the middle of key downtown areas.  Some cities (including Denver, DC, NYC, Providence and Dallas) are rethinking the relationship between urban spaces and the transportation networks.  


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VIDEO: TED Talk by Hans Rosling on global population growth

TED Talks The world's population will grow to 9 billion over the next 50 years -- and only by raising the living standards of the poorest can we check population growth.

 

TED talks are great resources, and this one about global population growth, is a great link with Hans Roslings trademark data visualizations that simplifiy complex data and 'tell the story,' but this time using far more common visual aids.


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Ken Morrison's comment, September 29, 2012 10:01 PM
Hello. Sorry about the suggestion. I thought I was posting that to my site. Have a great day. I really like your site.
Ken Morrison's comment, September 29, 2012 10:01 PM
Hello. Sorry about the suggestion. I thought I was posting that to my site. Have a great day. I really like your site. Ken
Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 21, 11:28 PM

Unit 2

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Interactive maps Mexico-USA migration channels

Interactive maps  Mexico-USA migration channels | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
In several previous posts we have looked at specific migration channels connecting Mexico to the USA: From Morelos to Minnesota; case study of a migrant...

 

An excellent way to show examples of chain migration and the gravity model...students will understand the concepts with concretes examples. These interactive maps have crisp geo-visualizations of the migratory flows.


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hailey thornton's curator insight, September 10, 9:33 AM

migration, what is it really? migration is where a citizen of a country decides to leave to a new country, whether it be voluntary or forced.a great example would be mexico. people jump the border to the us all the time. now where they go is important just as much as why they go there. as you can see the second largest percent of mexicans will go the texas. why you may ask it is because texas it the closest to the border. also they can relate to the people who live there. they go to california because of the vineyards . they can get easy  work that most natives dont want to do.

Roman Mirando's curator insight, September 10, 9:48 AM

This chart is displaying the mexican immigration from Mexico to the USA. It is showing displaying the main places they move to and the top five of the USA. It also shows the percentage of the immigrants there.

Grant Graves's curator insight, September 11, 7:39 PM

Mexico is the largest source of immigrants to the United States. In this way, tens of thousands of Mexicans citizens become American citizens every year, making up a larger and larger percentage of of the US population. However, at the same time, many Mexicans are unable to immigrate to the US due to quotas and other immigration laws. In this way, many Mexican Citizens have no choice but to stay in Mexico or cross the border illegally. I believe that the US should remove quotas and many immigration laws. If this could be done, citizenship could be given to all who want it, making more US citizens and stimulating the US economy by bringing in more jobs and tax dollars. This is due to the simple fact that illegal immigrants do not or cannot pay taxes.

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Declining Fertility Rates

Declining Fertility Rates | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The American birthrate is at a record low. What happens when having it all means not having children?

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Zakkary Catera's comment, September 13, 2013 12:36 AM
Children are our legacy, they are our future, and if the birth rate keeps depleting then who will be here to be pur next scientists or doctors? Then again a plus to this situation is how much lower the birth rate is, the more resources we have to equally share (i.e oil, food water etc.)
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:34 AM

In recent research people found that some women are content with not having any children. People might think this way because without a child people are able to do more things like go out or travel. Some may not want children due to expenses. If more people do not want children birth rates could decline over the years.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:23 PM

Not to bulky on information but it gets its point across. why are theyre so many social stigmas around having a kid?  A kid cost a little over a million dollars to raise why should it be looked down apon for choosing not to take the finacial and physical hardship. I personally have been on the fence about the subject because Im not a fan of this world is coming to and i wouldnt want to have someone I dearly care about to have to go through it. But thats neither hear nor there. 

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John Snow's cholera map of London recreated

John Snow's cholera map of London recreated | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
What would John Snow's famous cholera map look like on a modern map of London, using modern mapping tools?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 26, 2013 1:01 PM

John Snow's cholera map is often noted as a prime example of using spatial thinking to solve a scientific problem.  Here are a variety of resources to explore this classic example.  Here is an article that highlights the spatial thinking that produced this map, with KML files and in Google Fusion Tables.  See also these online GIS layers of Dr. Snow's famous map. 


Tagsmedical, models, spatial, mapping.   

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, October 25, 2013 11:00 PM

THere is a map of this in your textbook HUGGERS

 

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The Burgess and Hoyt Models

The Burgess and Hoyt Models | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

It is possible in many cities to identify zones with a particular type of land use - eg a residential zone. Often these zones have developed due to a combination of economic and social factors. In some cases planners may have tried to separate out some land uses, eg an airport is separated from a large housing estate.

 

The concentric and sector models in one news article?  The BBC is showing once again the possibilities available if only the United States taught more geography in the schools. 

 

Tags: urban, models, unit 7 cities, APHG.


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Sally Egan's curator insight, June 25, 2013 7:50 PM

Useful to develop understanding of the models of urban landuse zones within cities.

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NPR Video: Visualizing How A Population Hits 7 Billion

The United Nations says today symbolically marks the moment when the world's population reaches 7 billion. A little more than two centuries ago, the global population was 1 billion. How did it grow so big so fast?

 

This is an excellent way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model. 


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"Prezi:" Demographic Transition Model

Prezi in an online alternative to powerpoint for displaying notes and lecture materials (noted for it's ability to see the whole picture, zoom in and it's rotating animations).  Prezi is free for educators and the presentations you made can be kept private or made public.  This Prezi outlines the 4 stages of the Demographic Transition Model, with historical and spatial context.  Thanks for sharing Kari! 


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Seth Dixon's comment, September 28, 2011 10:45 AM
I could never "produce" all of this...thanks why I like to word "curate as used by the scoop.it site. In fact I've got my students collaborating with me on the "regional geography" page.
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Development and Demographic Changes: "The last woman..".

Development and Demographic Changes: "The last woman..". | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

While global population now is almost reaching 7 billion, mainly to due high birth rates in the developing world, many of the more developed parts of Asia (and elsewhere) are facing shrinking population as fewer women are choosing to marry and have children. 

 

This is a very concrete way to discuss the Demographic Transition Model and population issues around the world.   Cultural values shifting, globalization and demographics all merge together in this issue. 


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 3, 2011 8:05 PM
This is absolutely shocking! I never thought this was possible. It is even more shocking that it is so common within many countries and not just Hong Kong. The only two countries that seem to be in good standings are Canada and Brazil. All other 14 are at risk during the years 3000 to about 3050. Now due to this shrinking in female population then leading to just shrinking in population in general, wouldn't this then lead to a serious decrease in our global population and be for the better. Could this then mean more resources and less poverty? Although another idea that just came to mind, this situation would benefit India because they value males over females. The male is favored because they inherit land, pass on the family name, and financially provide for the parents. Overall this female population decline just merges a variety of concerns.
Robert Slone's curator insight, September 23, 8:40 AM

It is amazing how individual decisions can affect everything about the future,even the population of entire societies.